16 travel writing jobs for beginners

travel writer careers

When you hear the words “travel writing,” what comes to mind? Most people imagine staying at a luxurious hotel at the beach, dipping their toes in the water and sipping lemonade as they compose a few blog posts on their laptop from around the world. And while some travel writing jobs come with pre-paid travel and beautiful surroundings, there are plenty of other opportunities, even if you’re a beginning freelance writer.

What is travel writing?

Travel writers are people who get paid to write about travel. Any type of writing that touches on this topic can be considered travel writing. It’s a broad niche, so there are many different opportunities for you to try.

Here are a few things travel writers help to create:

  • Travel itineraries for popular destinations
  • Packing guides
  • Reviews about hotels, destinations, and popular restaurants
  • Travel advice
  • Social media content
  • Travel books

With so many options, travel writers can niche down and specialize in one or two areas, or stay generalists and work on whatever assignments they’re able to land.

How much money does a travel writer make?

While the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) doesn’t collect data specifically for travel writers, it does include information for writers and authors .

The median annual salary in 2019 was $63,200.

The type of travel writing job you select, the size of the company you work for, and your experience all play a part in determining how much money you can make. When you’re just getting started as a writer , you probably won’t earn as much as experienced travel writers. In fact, you might keep your day job while you write a few articles on the side. Then, as you gain experience and improve your portfolio, you can eventually say goodbye to your full-time job.

How do you get paid to travel and write?

Payment as a travel writer isn’t always in the form of cash. Sometimes, a company comps your travel expenses, food, and lodging. These are benefits you can negotiate with each client. Typically, the more experience you have and the larger your influence on social media, the more likely you are to get compensated for travel jobs.

Always find out the details of payment for travel writing jobs before agreeing to the work.

Is travel writing a good career?

travel writer careers

If you enjoy both traveling and writing, travel writing can be an excellent career choice. Your work may not even feel like work.

However, finding travel writing jobs won’t always be easy.

According to BLS , the writing industry is expected to have -2% growth over the next ten years.

This means you’ll experience more competition as you try to break into the travel industry as a writer.

Also, it’s important to remember that you’ll likely be running your own business as a travel writer instead of working as an employee. That means you’re responsible for paying your self-employment taxes , invoicing your clients , and making sure your business is legal . Being your own boss comes with a lot of responsibilities, but it can be a fulfilling experience.

Do you need a degree to be a travel writer?

While some travel writers have a degree in journalism or English, it’s not mandatory for many travel writing jobs. Most clients care more about your ability to create great content than your education and background.

However, here are six essential skills all travel writers should have.

  • Excellent writing skills. You want to engage people with the content you create. It needs to be well written and understandable. If you hate writing or struggle to put words together in a grammatically correct way, you’ll have a hard time in this position.
  • A passion for travel. If you’re a creature of comfort and a homebody, frequent travel to strange lands might be enough to suck the passion out of your writing. But if you love travel and writing, your enthusiasm can shine through and captivate your audience.
  • Broad knowledge of the travel industry. When you’re up to date with current trends, you can create authoritative content on that topic.
  • SEO knowledge. You want people to actually find the content you create, so you must use SEO best practices to make that happen.
  • Ability to research. You may need to create content about a travel topic that’s not your specialty. If you do, your ability to research and find accurate information online is vital. Research is also crucial if you’re going on a trip and writing about it. You’ll need to know where to go and what to share.
  • Organization skills. Deadlines are essential when you’re a writer. You need to keep track of your due dates and ensure you complete everything on time.

In addition to those basic skills, each hiring company has its own set of requirements. For instance, some may want you to include photos of your travel, so you’ll need to take great pictures.

Always read requirements for travel jobs carefully. You don't end up with anything unexpected in your workload.

68% of travel writers hold a Bachelor's degree. - Zippia

Here are some of the best types of travel writing jobs for those starting out:

  • Travel magazine article writer. There are loads of periodicals dedicated to travel. Many of them pay you to create content for them. You may even land a recurring writing gig if editors like your work enough.
  • Travel-themed social media content writer . Many travel companies market themselves on social media. You can find a job creating these posts.
  • Travel guide writer. Before someone takes a trip, they want to know what to expect. You can write the guidebook they need to have a blast on their journey.
  • Travel copywriter . If you know how to use your words to persuade people to take action, you can craft website copy, advertisements, brochures, and more in this position.
  • Travel blogger. You can start your own travel blog or write for existing ones. If you create your own, you may even get sponsors someday.
  • Travel eBook ghostwriter. As a ghostwriter, you’ll create content without getting a byline. Since you won’t be getting credit, you can often charge more for your work.
  • Destination travel writer. You can create content about specific destinations. In travel writing jobs like this, you’ll help readers learn more about each place’s culture, food, and climate.
  • Travel list article writer. List articles round up the top options in one easy-to-digest article. You can write about the top 10 road trips from Philadelphia, the best seven steak joints in the west, or about any number of travel-related topics.
  • Personal essay travel writer. People enjoy reading real travel stories. They can glean nuggets of wisdom from what you’ve experienced on your own travels.
  • Travel journalist. Journalists share the facts, not their opinions. You’ll have to do your research to succeed in these travel jobs. You can write documentaries, articles, books, and more as a travel journalist.
  • Press release writer. Hotels and destinations put out press releases when they open or make changes. You can help them market by crafting an informational piece for the press.
  • Video scriptwriter. YouTubers often use scripts to plan their video content. Some pay writers to craft these scripts for them.
  • Show notes writer. Are there any travel-themed podcasts you enjoy listening to? Each episode typically includes show notes, which sums up the content for people to scan. Someone has to produce those notes, and some companies hire writers to tackle this task.
  • Travel foodie writer. The best food can help make the best memories. If you’ve got a passion for travel and food, you can create restaurant reviews, dining tips, chef profiles, and more.
  • Local travel expert. What is unique about where you live? Create great content that shares the inside scoop with visitors. You can find travel writing jobs with regional magazines, local newspapers, and online publications.
  • Airline magazine writer. While many airlines have currently stopped publishing magazines due to the pandemic, these opportunities may see a comeback in the years ahead. If airlines resume publication, you can create content about travel and other lifestyle topics of interest to travelers.

How do you become a travel writer?

Now that you know more about travel writing, are you ready to become a travel writer? Here are five different strategies for finding paid work in this field.

1. Search job boards for travel jobs

If you’re looking for work, plan on regularly checking a couple of job boards and using filters to search for travel jobs. Indeed and ZipRecruiter are popular options. Companies from all different niches post job opportunities on these, so you’ll need to use the search or filter feature.

2. Cold pitch travel companies

You can send cold pitches to companies and ask them if they need any freelancers to create content. If you give this route a try, make sure you research each company before sending your pitch. You want to customize your email for each one so that it’s personalized. Otherwise, you’ll sound spammy and likely won’t get any responses.

3. Start your own travel website

Though this path takes longer to generate income, starting your own blog can be an excellent long-term strategy. Decide what type of travel writing you want to include on your blog, and start generating content.

You’ll have more success if you niche down even further. Will your blog be the go-to resource for large family travel? Or will you focus on minimalist travel? Do you prefer a more general lifestyle website, touching on travel and other areas of life? There’s no wrong answer, as you can always pivot later.

Once you know what you’re going to write about, start creating content. As your traffic grows through your content marketing strategy, you can begin the monetization process.

A bonus of creating your own blog is that you’ll be writing your own samples as you go. If you plan on writing for others, you’ll need a portfolio with quality pieces to demonstrate your skills.

4. Turn to social media

You can use social media for marketing your new business and finding new clients. Make sure you’re following other travel writers on the platforms where you’re active. You can glean tips and tricks from them as you continue to grow your business.

You can also connect with companies that post journalist opportunities. For instance, if you’re on Twitter, check out feeds from @Mediabistro , @FreelanceWJ , and @jjobs_tweets . These three post various writing jobs, and you can use their content to check for travel writing work.

Hashtag searches can also help you find gigs on social media. Search for #travelwriters, #writersneeded, and #editorchat to see if anyone needs help.

On social media, you’ll have to wade through a lot of noise to find positions. If you’re easily distracted, setting a time limit or giving yourself boundaries to stay productive can keep you focused.

Never too late to start: More than 50% of travel writers are over 50 years old. - Zippia

5. Pitch publications that accept posts

Another way to score paid travel jobs is to send a pitch to lifestyle or travel publications that frequently hire freelance writers. Further below, there’s a list of 35 different companies you can pitch. Most of them are a great fit even if you’re a beginner.

If you get a byline with your post, you can use these articles as samples to build your portfolio. Having a strong portfolio is essential when landing future work, so make sure to submit quality pieces for each site.

To help increase your chances of getting accepted, here are four tips for pitching to travel publications:

  • Study the site before you pitch. You want your content to match their reader’s expectations. Otherwise, you may send a pitch with some personal travel stories when they really want travel guides. Let their existing content be your guide, and see what’s missing from their site. That’s what you want to provide, instead of rehashing the same topic for the third time.
  • Follow the directions. Every site has its pitching requirements. Read them carefully and follow them precisely. If you’re looking to guest post to grow your portfolio and gain credibility as a beginner, note any guest-posting policies listed. Many questions about the process will be here, which make the pitching process easier for you.
  • Personalize your pitch. If you’re sending an email, take time to find out who you should address it to. Do some research on the site to find the owner or editor’s name. As you write your pitch, make it clear that you’ve spent time studying the publication’s content and know that you can create a piece that resonates with its audience.
  • Keep your pitch short. Editor teams get a lot of emails. Do them a favor, and don’t write a novel. Include the information they ask for, and tell them a little bit about yourself and your travel experiences. But don’t write your entire life story.

35 travel publications that hire freelance writers

travel writer careers

If you’re ready to get your business off the ground and pitch some travel publications, here are some you can start with. You’ll find a variety of travel websites and printed travel magazines that accept freelance writers and offer paid travel jobs, even if you’re a beginner. All published rates are in USD.

Travel websites and magazines

travel writer careers

Can you create an honest, well-written and detailed travel piece or destination guide? Will your content guide a future traveler? If yes, you’ll want to query GoNOMAD . If your work is published, you’ll get $25.

The editors have plenty of tips for freelance travel writers in the writer’s guidelines, so take the time to read them carefully. Please note that photos are required, so make sure you have some quality images ready to share as well.

2. Outpost Magazine

This Canadian travel publication features long-form travel journalism and beautiful photographs from around the world. This company has both an online and a print publication, and it accepts freelance articles for both.

If you’re hoping to get published with Outpost online, you’ll want to keep your piece between 800-1,500 words. Longer articles, from 2,000 to 5,000 words, are accepted for the print magazine. You’ll need to work out payment terms with the editor during the pitching process.

3. Pathfinders Travel Magazine

A travel magazine for people of color, Pathfinders provides readers with lively, well-written stories about where to go and what to do. It also accepts articles for their Chef’s Table and Wine Column sections. While payment depends on the article type, most pay $150.

If you’re a freelance writer who hasn’t worked with this magazine before, its editors want you to pitch with a completed article instead of a query.

4. World Nomads

Do you have a life-changing travel experience to share with the world? If you do, World Nomads wants to know about it. In addition to written content, World Nomads also accepts photo essays and video content. For written stories of 600 to 800 words, it pays $0.50 per word. You can see on its website other payment details and which categories are currently accepting pitches.

5. My Itchy Travel Feet

If you can create content geared for travel-loving baby boomers, you’ll want to pitch My Itchy Travel Feet. Posts must be at least 700 words, be original, and come with high-quality photos. The week of publication, you’ll receive $30.

6. Hit the Road

You can earn $50 and a link to your website if you get published on Hit the Road . It publishes content about road journeys in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and Canada.

7. Travel and Leisure

While this publication doesn’t have specific writer’s guidelines on its site or information about pay, the editors do accept pitches from freelance travel writers. Some writers report that this magazine pays well. This means you’ll want to wow the editors with your pitch, so make sure it isn’t something that’s already covered in previous editions. You can find the email address to submit your pitch on Travel and Leisure’s “Contact Us” page.

Wander accepts original articles from commercial brands and freelance writers about wellness and travel. While submissions to their website are unpaid, this company also has a print magazine. As part of your query for that publication, you share your desired rate with the editor.

9. Hidden Compass

The editors at Hidden Compass aren’t driven by travel destinations. Rather, its readers want to hear your stories and how your experiences connect travel to a broader conversation. If your article is accepted, you’ll receive a flat-rate plus 50% of crowdfunding proceeds.

10. Road & Travel Magazine

Submit travel articles about hotels, spas, travel destination reviews, and other travel topics to Road & Travel Magazine . This publication has a slant towards women, so make sure your post appeals to this target audience. The required length ranges from 200-300 words for blog posts to 1,000-1,200 words for feature articles. You’ll work out payment details with the editor.

11. Verge Publications

If you travel with a purpose, you might be a great fit for Verge magazine , a digital publication. Its readers are socially aware and want to make a difference. Submissions about volunteering, working, or studying abroad are welcome. Verge editors will notify you of payment details if they accept your piece for publication.

12. Transitions Abroad

The detailed writer’s guidelines on the Transitions Abroad website can help improve your chances of getting published. It looks for pieces about cultural immersion travel, living abroad, slow travel, country guides, and more. This company pays between $75-150 for an accepted article.

13. Go World Travel

Help the readers of Go World Travel experience a destination through your words. Articles should be in the 850-1,600 word range and include an “If You Go” section at the bottom. Accepted posts are worth $30 to 40.

14. GoMad Nomad Travel Mag

You can pitch GoMad Nomad Travel Mag with article ideas about travel advice, travel destinations, and travel stories. It accepts unpaid guest posts from travel bloggers in exchange for a link. You can also opt to receive a $25 payment instead.

15.Loaded Landscapes

If your passions include travel, photography, and writing, you’ll want to submit a pitch to Loaded Landscapes . It accepts travel articles and written content related to landscape, nature, and travel photography. Payment terms are negotiated with the editor but are in the $20 to $150 range.

16.Backpacker

Do you prefer traveling on foot? Backpacker accepts freelance writer contributions related to human-powered travel such as hiking, canoeing, and kayaking. If the company is interested in your pitch, you’ll work out payment details with the editor.

Lifestyle websites and magazines that accept travel content

travel writer careers

17. The Penny Hoarder

Can you stretch your pennies during travel? If you have tips and tricks for traveling on a budget, The Penny Hoarder wants to hear about them. Your article must be evergreen and at least 700 to 900 words. You’ll work out payment details with the editor.

18. Listverse

While Listverse isn’t strictly a travel website, it does accept list posts about the travel industry. If the editors select your post for publication, you’ll earn $100.

19. Outdoor NW

This magazine regularly publishes adventure travel and outdoor recreation stories. You can query the editor of Outdoor NW with your article ideas related to these topics. Payment ranges from $35 for an inside photo to $125 for a feature article.

20. AARP The Magazine

Do you have tips to help AARP’s readers know how and where to travel? If you do, send your story as an email to the editors at AARP The Magazine . While it’s not an exclusive travel magazine, this lifestyle publication does include articles in the travel niche. Some writers report AARP pays $1 per word for online publications and $2 per word for print.

RV lifestyle websites and magazines

travel writer careers

21. Escapees Magazine

What tips and advice can you offer to make the RVing lifestyle easier? If you’ve got something unique, pitch it to Escapees Magazine . Though the magazine prioritizes member content, it does accept submissions from non-members. Escapee Magazine pays $100 to $200 for feature submissions and $50 to $100 for short fillers.

22.Trailer Life Magazine

Topics about the RV lifestyle are welcomed in Trailer Life Magazine . Payment ranges from $100 to $700 for published posts, depending on the category. This travel publication also pays for photos, so consider submitting them if you have some great RV shots.

23. ROVA: The Magazine for Epic Road Trips

Are you an RV travel expert? Share your North American road-tripping travel stories with ROVA as an article or photo essay. If your piece is accepted, you get a flat rate of $200, plus a byline in ROVA magazine.

Local publications with travel sections

travel writer careers

24. Arizona Highways

This publication encourages travel to and from the great state of Arizona. It accepts queries once a year, so if you’ve missed it for this year, put it on your to-do list for the next opening. Pay rates for articles accepted by Arizona Highways vary.

25. Canadian Geographic

Twice a year, this magazine publishes a Canadian Geographic Travel section. If you’ve got a great idea about travel in Canada, you’ll want to submit it to its editors. The magazine only purchases a few articles for each issue, so you’ll need to have patience with this publication.

26. Kansas! Magazine

Can you use your words and photos to promote Kansas tourism? Kansas! Magazine articles emphasize travel in this midwest state. You can work out the payment terms with the editor during the query process.

27. Seattle magazine

If you know your way around the Pacific Northwest, Seattle magazine wants to hear from you. Its writer guidelines are full of information to improve your chances of publication, so make sure you read them in full. You’ll need to wait quite a while for payment after publication, so be aware of that if you’re looking for a travel writing job that pays quickly.

28. Time Out New York

While this magazine isn’t one you can send a pitch to, it occasionally hires employees to create content about New York. If you can create articles that encourage people to explore this city and the surrounding areas, you might be a great fit. You can find more details on the Time Out New York’s career page .

"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes." - Marcel Proust

Other paying travel writing publications to consider

Once you have a little experience as a freelance writer, you can try pitching for some of these travel writing jobs as well:

  • Lonely Planet
  • National Geographic
  • Global Grasshopper
  • Great Escape Publishing
  • Dotdash (look in the freelance category for travel openings)

Grow your freelance travel writing business

Being published on popular travel websites can help you grow your business as a travel writer. You can also get your name out there by guest posting on the sites below. Though these articles aren’t paid, landing bylines in reputable digital and print publications are great for your portfolio when starting out.

  • Journey Women
  • The Foodellers
  • The Art of Travel
  • Practical Wanderlust
  • The Roads You Travel

Final tips for growing your writing business

Now that you have a list of publications you can submit content to, here are five final tips to help you succeed as a freelance travel writer and as you search for travel jobs.

  • Read the directions. We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again in case you missed it the first time: read the instructions of the publication you’re pitching to. You’d be surprised how many emails editors toss in the trash because the freelance writer didn’t follow directions. Always take the time to read writer guidelines and make sure your pitch is a good fit before you send it in.
  • Remember to invoice. If you’re getting paid for an article, most companies want you to send them an invoice . No invoice means no payment, so don’t forget this step.
  • Improve your photography skills. While not every site requires you to send in photos, many do. Learn how to take great pictures so that you can send a complete package to publications.
  • Continue pitching. Your content won’t be a great fit for every publication. If you get told no, don’t take it personally. Instead, send more pitches. You’ll only fail to get a yes if you give up.
  • Keep track of your expenses. As a travel writer, you might be able to write off some of your travel expenses. However, you need to keep track of these in a professional way that’s easy to figure out when tax season rolls around.

Get paid to write about travel

With so many freelance writing jobs available, there’s no reason you can’t launch a career as a travel writer. So pick a publication that interests you, and get started today.

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travel writer careers

travel writer careers

Travel Writing Jobs Hiring Now – A List for Newbies!

Last Updated: October 19, 2021

*FYI - this post may contain affiliate links, which means we earn a commission at no extra cost to you if you purchase from them. Also, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Check out our Privacy Policy and Disclosure. for more info.

travel writer careers

As far as dream jobs go, getting paid to write about travel is pretty darn sweet, so I’ve compiled a list of freelance travel writing jobs for you below that are currently accepting pitches and submissions, even from newbie travel writers.

I’m very fortunate in that my own blogging ventures now support me full time, but back in the early days of blogging, I mainly devoted my days to toiling and blogging for free… or worse, for exposure.

I don’t know if you’ve every tried buying Chipotle with exposure, but it usually doesn’t pan out. And you most definitely don’t get guac.

Well, if you’re looking for travel writer jobs so you, too, can start getting paid to travel, this post is for you.

travel writer careers

Save this list of freelance travel writing jobs for later!

You’ll be very glad you did.

An Honest Note on Finding Travel Writer Jobs

If you’re wondering how to be a travel writer, or how to earn a full-time living as a content writer for travel websites, here’s the truth: behind every glamorous travel writer is a long history of hustle, failed pitches and crippling self-doubt.

Not to scare you off or anything, but breaking into the travel writing industry and finding well-paying freelance travel writing jobs is a real piece of work.

You’ll find a truly shocking range in the amount that publications pay. In this list for example, I have publications that offer anything from $10 per article to $750.

Professional travel writing friends of mine tell me they usually make upwards of $1000 per print article.

Woman writing in a notebook with a mug of coffee

So really, the range is huge. This list is mainly meant for newbie travel writers looking to break into the industry and find freelance travel writing jobs that will accept cold pitches from anyone.

Once you become more experienced, build relationships with editors, and assemble a stronger portfolio for yourself, you should be able to command much higher rates and secure work more consistently.

For now though, if you’re an aspiring travel content writer, refer to my list below of publications online that accept travel writing pitches and submissions from regular folks, arranged from highest payout to lowest.

NOTE: That there are plenty more freelance travel writing jobs out there accepting submissions (especially big names like National Geographic and Travel + Leisure), but I specifically chose ones that are open to submissions from anyone (including newbies/non-pros), had clear guidelines outlined on their website.

Girl walking in front of a world map installation

Freelance Travel Writers Wanted! Write for Me 🙂

Before I launch into the list of freelance travel writing jobs below, I’m actively looking for writers to contribute to this blog you see right here.

Specifically, I am looking for experts in USA or Europe travel who can write with a humourous tone and research unique, fun and offbeat things to do for city guides and itineraries.

If this sounds like you, send me an email with the subject title “Guacamole Donuts!”, along with some writing samples and your rate per blog post. NOTE: Due to a high volume of emails, I will only be replying to pitches I am interested in. Thanks for your understanding, and I look forward to hearing from you.

travel writer careers

Now, onto the other places you can get paid for writing articles about travel…

Los Angeles Times

Payment: Print stories vary from $200 to $750. Online only stories generally pay $500. Original photos paid separately

Let’s start with a big one – according to their official website, the Los Angeles Times is looking for “bold, original travel features that tell a great story.”

Specifically, they are on the hunt for content that is “sophisticated, compelling, complete and written with flair.”

Click here for their writing guidelines

Woman with bracelets and rings typing on a laptop

Cruising World

Payment: Ranges from $25 – $1000 depending on a variety of factors

Cruise experts looking for a paid travel writing gig (and a potentially very lucrative one at that) should look into Cruising World, who are looking for a variety of articles from a first-person perspective.

I’ve only ever been on one cruise before (the Celebrity Edge !) but if you’re an exert on cruises, this would be a great travel writing job to pursue.

Learn more about this freelance travel writing opportunity here

travel writer careers

Wanderlust Travel Magazine

Payment: £220 per article

Wanderlust publishes 10 issues a year and is mainly on the hunt for “inspirational round-ups, lists, guides and advice pieces” rather than narrative pieces… so imagine articles like my places to visit in England piece, my places to visit in the Cotswolds piece, or my Germany travel guide.

Specifically, they want writing with a “trustworthy voice and inspirational ideas”.

Learn more about writing for them here

Woman writing in a notebook

International Living Magazine

Payment:  $225 for 900 words and $350 for 1,600 words

This magazine “aims at providing a scope and depth of information about global travel, living, retiring, investing, and real estate that is not available anywhere else at any price.”

This is not a general travel magazine, but rather a “niche publication for living and retiring overseas”, so definitely don’t be pitching them general travel hacks , packing tips, or off-brand content like guides on backpacking in Europe.

Read more about contributing for them here

Beach picnic with a baguette and orange juice

Payment: $200 per article/photo essay

For those interested in travel writing jobs related to the US, road tripping, and RV-ing, definitely look into becoming a contributor for ROVA.

Specifically, they are looking for “stories of life on the road” in the US.

Here are their contributor guidelines

Winding road at sunset among green hills

Pathfinders Travel Magazine

Payment: $150 per article, $20 per photo

Pathfinders is another pay per article site that has a target audience of African Americans (although they sometimes accept content relating to other persons of colour).

They’re looking for “lively, original, well-written stories that provide a good sense of place, with useful information and fresh ideas about travel and the travel industry.”

Check out their Writers’ Guidelines here

Notebook on a bed with a book behind it and a cozy blanket

Escapees Magazine

Payment:  $150 per article (max)

This one is a bit more niche, but is an excellent freelance writing gig if you have the necessary expertise.

Escapees Magazine is looking for contributors who are “RVers interested in sharing the RV lifestyle” and can write in an engaging and conversational tone.

So, if you are looking for a travel writer job dealing with RVs, this is a great option.

You can read their guidelines for submission here

Faraway shot of an RV driving on a scenic road

Great Escape Publishing

Payment: $150 for interviews, personal stories, and any articles they request for the website

While they don’t accept pure travel pieces, Great Escape Publishing is on the look for “articles on the craft and business of getting paid to travel, whether by writing, photography, tours or other means.”

If you are an expert on getting paid to travel, or are interested in freelance travel writing jobs on this topic, then this would be a great oppotunity to look into.

Check out their writers’ guidelines here

Man on his laptop with a scenic view behind him

Intrepid Times

Payment: $50 – $150 per article

Intrepid Times publishes narrative travel writing with heart. They are looking for factual, first-person narratives of between 800 and 2000 words about your travel experiences.

All stories are considered and the editors make an effort to provide paid publishing opportunities to writers who have not been previously published elsewhere.

Submit your writing on their official site here

Tales to Go

Payment: $100 honorarium per article

If you’re a freelance travel content writer with great stories to tell, here is an opportunity you might be interested in. Tales to Go is “looking for personal, nonfiction stories and anecdotes—funny, illuminating, adventurous, frightening, or grim.”

Specifically, they are seeking stories that “reflect that unique alchemy that occurs when you enter unfamiliar territory and begin to see the world differently as a result.” Bonus: they accept previously published content!

View their Submission Guidelines here

Woman with a backpack smiling on a road while crossing

Payment: $100 per list

If you want to find paid blog writing opportunities outside of the travel niche, then here’s one. Listverse isn’t limited to just travel content, so you can submit content on anything from cheesy country pickup lines to world capitals , plus their process is very simple. According to their website:

“You write your list (10 items per list minimum), you send it in , we reply and say “Great—we’ll publish it” and send you $100 by PayPal”. Not a bad deal!

Here’s how you can write for Listverse

Man with glasses writing in a notebook

Matador Network

Payment: $80-$100 per article

While no longer limited to just writing, Matador Network regularly posts open calls for written submissions based on topics they’re looking for on their Matador Creators page.

They have a lot of different freelance travel writing jobs they post on there, but usually they specify what area of expertise they’re looking for, whether it’s for an event like Oktoberfest , or destination specific like knowing all the best places to visit in France.

See available paid travel writing opportunities here

Word document on a laptop perched on a ledge

Hit the Road

Payment : $50 per article

Looking for freelance travel writing jobs related to road tripping? Hit the Road is seeking “original writing, photography, and video that speaks to the adventures, cultures, and amazing experiences of road trips in Australia, New Zealand the USA and Canada.”

All the better if you travel by camper van or motor home!

Learn more about this travel writing job

Blue van parked on an empty Autumn street

Payment: $50 per article

Those interested in freelance travel writer work that focuses on the North American desert, then definitely look into writing for Desert USA, who regularly publish content related to “adventure, desert lore, photo essays, events, southwest arts & crafts”.

As they say on their submissions page, they place a “strong emphasis in natural and cultural history is a major theme in our website and a popular interest to readers”.

Learn more on their Submissions page here

US desertscape with a pink sunrise

The Expeditioner

Payment: $30 per article

If you’re looking for blogs that pay writers, there are actually a lot of options of there.

The Expeditioner for example looks for “first-person narratives of all lengths and sizes (anywhere from 1,200 words and up),” and on occasion also “Top 10 pieces, location overviews and other types of non-narrative pieces”.

According to their site, their only requirement is that the “piece be interesting, informative and inspiring for future travelers.”

Their Submissions page can be found here

Woman in a yellow jacket writing on top of a mountain

My Itchy Travel Feet

This site is looking for original content that caters to their target audience of “active, travel-loving baby boomers”. The content they’re looking for is “personable and relatable… [but] also informative.”

This is another example of blogs that pay writers and are actively looking for article writers.

Visit their contributors page here

Car driving on the road with white shoes poking out of the passenger seat

Go World Travel

Payment: $30-40 per article/photo essay

Content writing for travel sites can often feel like an impossible industry to break into, but there are definitely plenty out there that welcome first-time writers as well.

For an opportunity that is newbie-friendly, Go World Travel welcomes all kinds of contributors “from seasoned travel journalists to first-time writers”. They’re on the hunt for “honest, down-to-earth descriptive writing” (so no plain listicles here!).

Learn more about writing for them here!

Woman writing on a notebook with a laptop in front of her

Payment: $25 per article

For another opportunity content writing for travel websites, GoNOMAD is looking for “excellent, entertaining, informative, and unique travel articles and research about destinations, activities, and experiences.”

Specifically their focus is on “honest, accurate, well-written and detailed articles and destination guides that speak to an educated, curious, and well-traveled audience.”

Here is their submissions page

Woman writing on a laptop

Epicure & Culture

Payment : $10 per story, paid upon final draft acceptance

Epicure & Culture aims to help travelers have more ethical, meaningful experiences abroad.

Along with guides focused on responsible tourism and impact travel, you’ll find stories that feature local changemakers and immersive cultural experiences.

Learn more about submitting to them here

Notebook and coffee on a desk

Verge Magazine

Verge prides itself on being a “magazine for people who travel with purpose,” focusing on topics like volunteering, working and studying overseas.

Their “readers are typically young (17-40 years), or young at heart, active, independent travellers who want to do something different and make a difference doing it.”

Issue-driven, engaging content with a focus on unique people/experiences is what they’re looking for, so if you’re looking for a travel writing job that goes beyond typical guides, this is a great option.

Check out their Contributor Guide here

Woman in yellow coat in a field with yellow flowers

Outpost Magazine

Payment: Negotiable

This is a Canadian publication that takes “pride in covering travel in a unique and insightful way”.

They have a variety of article types that they publish, ranging from Insider Guides and Thrillseeker features to long Feature Stories.

Click here for their contributor guidelines

Canadian flag with mountains in the background

I hope this list of freelance travel writing jobs was helpful!

Are there any big ones I missed? Let me know in the comments! And feel free to leave any tips or success stories for me too. Happy pitching!

My Go-To Travel Favourites:

🧳 Eagle Creek: My favourite packing cubes

💳 Wise: For FREE travel friendly credit cards

🍯 Honey: For finding coupons automatically

🏨 Booking.com: For searching hotels

📷 Sony A7IV: My (amazing) camera

✈️ Google Flights : For finding flight deals

🌎 WorldNomads: For travel insurance

🎉 GetYourGuide: For booking activities

52 thoughts on “Travel Writing Jobs Hiring Now – A List for Newbies!”

wow! thanks for all these ideas! have you done any writing for any of these?

You’re welcome, Tanja!! I haven’t written for any of these, but I know many who have 🙂 They’re all definitely legitimate! I’ve only done a handful of freelance travel writing gigs and in those cases, the companies have always approached me. Would love to get into writing for other publications once I have more time though.

Thanks so much for this valuable resource. It is so helpful for newbie bloggers like us! I’m also glad that you confirmed all sources are legitimate. Sometimes it can be hard to know which sources are up to date and real. From one blogger to another, thanks 🙂

You’re welcome, Cecilia! Glad it helped!

THANK YOU for this! New to your blog but have been loving the tips, advice and helpful resources 🙂

You’re very welcome!! hehe so happy to hear you’ve been finding my guides helpful. <3 let me know if you have any questions, Felicia!

Wowww, THANK YOU so much for this list! Bookmarking! – Charmaine https://charmainenyw.com

You’re welcome!!! 😀 Hope you land a gig through one of these soon!

Wou, awesome info!

😀 Thanks Anja! Best of luck!

Bookmarked – great post, thank you! Certainly will try and give it a go.

Thanks, Anna! Best of luck with your pitches 🙂 Be sure to let me know if you land something!

Great ideas thank you!

You’re very welcome, Ari! 🙂

I LOVE THIS POST! THANK YOU! And yes, everything is in cap-lock, just to show how excited and happy I found this post…your blog in general. This is something I would absolutely to get into. Thank you so much.

xoxoxoxoxo Bukky

haha awww Bukky thanks so much!! I really hope this post helped you. Let me know if you land any writing gigs!

These are some fantastic sources! Thank you so much for sharing xx

http://www.wildfirecharm.com

You’re very welcome!! 😀

Thank you for this, so helpful! I’m new to your blog and I love your tips and the overall vibe, really inspirational.

Agnese xx https://agnesescoiffeuse.blogspot.com/

Interesting article! Well done. Thanks for sharing. Hope you have a great week!

Thanks, Jo. Hope you have an awesome week as well!

Thank you for this! I will keep it bookmarked until I build a bit more followers! Setting those dreams! Cheers!

You’re very welcome, Maegan!

This is fantastic.. thank you so much for sharing your wisdom!

Can’t wait to get on to some of these!

So happy you found it helpful!! Best of luck, Dani 🙂 <3

Thank you for this clear and useful information and advice. I’m going to be traveling with a group of teen girls in a few weeks and thought maybe I could write a freelance article about the pre-planning and actual trip when I get back. I’m trying to capture the entire process in notes and images for latter when I sit down to write. Do you think a trip to LA California to a concert with 4 teen girls is something the companies you spoke of who be interested in purchasing?

Hey Cheaquetta, sounds like a fun trip!! All of these publications have different focuses, so I would recommend sitting down and doing some research of your own to determine whether or not your piece will be a good fit. I would find publications that have published similar content in the past and go from there. 🙂 Best of luck!

Useful information. Many thanks. I’d like to try to write something for them.

you’re welcome! happy writing 🙂

Wow nice blog ..keep the fire burning

aw thank you!

nice article. keep it up. thumbs up for you.

I just found your blog today – definitely some on this list I hadn’t come across before. Thanks!

No problem. Hope it helped, Claire!

Thanks for this great list! I’ve opened a few of them in new tabs and will definitely be looking into applying and contributing with them. Doesn’t hurt to get some extra money on the side!

Happy Monday and thank you so much for this great info. I an very interested in sharing my travel experiences and getting a few dollars on the side! If you don’t mind please check out my travel blog “Travel Is D’New Black.”

http://www.travelisdnewblack.com

Great list!! Thank you so much for this useful information. I am a travel blogger. Check out my travel blog “Best World Travel Guide”. https://bestworldtravelguide.wordpress.com/

Thanks for reading, Adam!

Thanks for sharing a great list!

This is an awesome list of writing sites!

Informative post. Thanks for sharing; I am sure this post is helpful to many of us who might be looking to work independently in a more passion-filled field .

Thank you for sharing this! I was scouring the inter webs trying to find the info myself when I and found this on Pinterest!

Thanks for sharing for sharing this info

Thanks for this amazing information babes. Dropped by via a google search. Keeping an eye on you now 🙂 Loved it.

Thanks so much for the nice comment! 🙂

Wonderful blog. Thanks for sharing this informative article.

Welcome! Thanks for reading!

“Great read” ,this is a most important list for every travel blogger When you travel live freely and enjoy every moment of journey-:) .

thanks for the nice article 🙂 interesting reading

It’s A Piece Of Great Information. Thank You For This Information.

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How to become a travel writer

Is becoming a travel writer right for me.

The first step to choosing a career is to make sure you are actually willing to commit to pursuing the career. You don’t want to waste your time doing something you don’t want to do. If you’re new here, you should read about:

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Still unsure if becoming a travel writer is the right career path? Take the free CareerExplorer career test to find out if this career is right for you. Perhaps you are well-suited to become a travel writer or another similar career!

Described by our users as being “shockingly accurate”, you might discover careers you haven’t thought of before.

How to become a Travel Writer

Becoming a travel writer requires a passion for travel, strong writing skills, and the ability to conduct thorough research. Here are the steps to becoming a travel writer:

  • Develop strong writing skills: Strong writing skills are essential for becoming a travel writer. Take writing courses or workshops, read widely, and practice writing regularly. You can start a blog or contribute to online publications to gain experience and build a portfolio.
  • Travel extensively: Traveling is the foundation of becoming a travel writer. You need to explore new places, immerse yourself in different cultures, and experience the world firsthand. Start by exploring your own region, and then expand your travels to more distant destinations.
  • Read extensively: Read extensively to gain inspiration and to learn from other travel writers. Read travel books, travel magazines, and online publications to learn about different writing styles and to gain an understanding of the industry.
  • Choose a niche: Decide on a niche or specialty that sets you apart from other travel writers. Consider focusing on adventure travel, budget travel, luxury travel, family travel, or cultural travel, for example. This will help you develop a unique voice and make it easier to pitch stories to editors.
  • Build a portfolio: Build a portfolio of your travel writing. This can include blog posts, articles, and other published work. Consider submitting your writing to online publications or local newspapers to gain experience and exposure.
  • Network with other writers and industry professionals: Attend travel writing conferences, join travel writing organizations, and network with other writers and industry professionals. This will help you learn about the industry and gain insights into the latest trends and opportunities.
  • Pitch stories to editors: Once you have a portfolio of writing, start pitching story ideas to editors of travel magazines, newspapers, and websites. Research the publication and understand its editorial style, and tailor your pitch accordingly. Be persistent and follow up on your pitches.
  • Be prepared for rejection: Rejection is a common experience for travel writers, and it's important to be prepared for it. Keep refining your writing skills and your portfolio, and don't be discouraged by rejection.
  • Consider freelancing: Many travel writers work as freelancers, writing for multiple publications or clients. Consider building a freelance career and working with a variety of clients to gain experience and exposure.

Formal Education There is no specific formal education required to become a travel writer, but a Bachelor's Degree in Journalism , Writing , Creative Writing , English , or Communications can provide a solid foundation in writing and research skills that are essential for a career in travel writing. Some colleges and universities offer travel writing courses or workshops as part of their English or creative writing programs.

Additionally, courses in photography , videography, and social media can be helpful in developing the skills needed to produce compelling content for a travel writing career. Knowledge of website design and development, search engine optimization, and digital marketing can also be beneficial for building an online presence as a travel writer.

Certifications There are a few certifications that can be helpful in developing the skills and knowledge needed for a career in travel writing.

  • The International Travel Writing and Photography Academy offers courses and certifications in travel writing, photography, and videography. These courses cover topics such as researching and pitching stories, travel photography and videography, and digital marketing for travel writers.
  • The Society of American Travel Writers (SATW) offers a Travel Journalism and Photography Internship Program, which provides hands-on experience in travel writing, photography, and videography. This program is open to undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in pursuing a career in travel journalism.
  • The Professional Association of Travel Writers (PATW) offers a certification program for travel writers. The program requires completion of a series of courses and the submission of a portfolio of published work. The certification is designed to demonstrate a high level of proficiency in travel writing and to provide credibility to potential clients.
  • The American Writers and Artists Institute (AWAI) offers a travel writing program that covers topics such as finding story ideas, conducting research, and pitching stories to editors. The program includes a series of courses and provides access to a community of travel writers and industry professionals.

Online Resources There are many online resources available for travel writers that can provide inspiration, guidance, and opportunities for networking and professional development. Here are some examples:

  • Travel Writing World: This podcast features interviews with travel writers and industry professionals, covering topics such as finding your niche, pitching stories to editors, and building a freelance career.
  • Matador Network: This website features articles, photography, and video content from a global network of travel writers and photographers. Matador Network also offers courses and resources for travel writers.
  • Lonely Planet: Lonely Planet is a well-known travel guidebook publisher that also features travel articles and destination guides on its website. Lonely Planet also offers a travel writing competition and resources for aspiring travel writers.
  • Writers in the Sky: This website features a directory of travel writing courses and workshops, as well as resources for finding jobs and opportunities in travel writing.
  • Society of American Travel Writers: The Society of American Travel Writers is a professional organization for travel writers, photographers, and industry professionals. SATW offers networking opportunities, a mentorship program, and an annual conference.
  • Travel Massive: Travel Massive is a global network of travel industry professionals, including travel writers, bloggers, and photographers. The organization offers networking events, workshops, and online resources.
  • Travel Blog Success: This website offers courses and resources for travel bloggers, including tips for building a successful blog and strategies for monetizing your content.
  • National Geographic: National Geographic is a well-respected publisher of travel articles and photography, and offers resources for aspiring travel writers and photographers on its website.

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Blog • Perfecting your Craft

Last updated on Jul 12, 2023

How to Become a Travel Writer in 5 Steps: A Guide for Travel Bugs

For most people, trekking through the mountains or sampling French cuisine is a rare treat. For travel writers, it might just be another day on the job. As their job title suggests, travel writers create content about anything and everything related to exploring the world. 

Whether they’re writing to help readers plan a trip or to transport them — through words — to places they may never visit, no two travel writers share the same journey through their careers. But if you intend to walk down this road and become a travel writer, here are five steps to help you on your professional adventure.

Learn to be a descriptive writer and a thorough researcher

If there’s a single skill-set that almost all great travel writers share, it would be in research and descriptive writing. While people in this profession often have degrees in English or journalism, this is not a strict requirement. People come to travel writing from all walks of life, and publications tend to be concerned with your ability to deliver a great piece over any advanced degree. 

Although there isn’t any specific travel writing degree, if you want to learn all you can in one centralized place, there are many travel writing courses that train everyone from experienced journalists to new writers. 

Immerse readers with your descriptive writing

A landscape of the Azore Islands

Readers want you to take them on a journey with you. If you can’t pay for them to join you on a sea voyage to the Azores, you’ll have to settle for evoking the five senses and other descriptive writing techniques. 

Take for example, Paul Theroux. A prolific travel writer with a career spanning five decades, he’s treasured for his ability to pull readers into his adventures with simple yet evocative language, as he does in his essay, “ Taking the Great American Roadtrip ”: 

What made Barstow's billboards a peculiar blight was the contrast with everything that lay around them—the landscape that was so stark and dramatic as a brooding expanse of withered shrubs and fat cactuses, the stony roads that seemed to lead nowhere, the bleak and beautiful backdrop that seemed as though no one had laid a hand on it, with lively colorations at a distance and up close so dry, like a valley of bones looking as though they could not support life. I had seen deserts in Patagonia and Turkmenistan, northern Kenya and Xinjiang in western China; but I had never seen anything like this. The revelation of the Mojave Desert was (peering past the billboards) not just its illusion of emptiness but its assertive power of exclusion, the low bald hills and far-off mountains looking toasted and forbidding under the darkening sky.

Theroux invites the reader on the road with him and describes the desert landscape in crisp detail. The use of simile (“like a valley of bones”) and strong language (“stark, dramatic”) brings the piece to life and gives us a view from Theroux’s window so it feels like we’re traveling along with him. 

How do you remember and keep track of all these details while you’re on the go? Keeping a journal while you’re traveling — even if it’s just to another part of the town you live in — is a great method to have all the information you need to write your story when you finally get to sit down and reflect on your journey. 

Cherry-pick the details that will tell the best story

Though you may have recorded many interesting details, you can’t include everything. Travel writing may feature a lot of exposition to set the scene, but it isn’t the same thing as keeping a journal. To make a stronger piece, you need to focus on the right stories and details, which means knowing what to add and what you can leave out.

At the same time, being concise is important. Unless you’re running your own blog or website, most digital or physical publications will have word limits to adhere to. Identifying what’s most important and most interesting to your audience as you write makes for more compelling writing. 

Preparation is key

For travel writers, research skills go hand-in-hand with writing skills. You might be asked to write about a topic you aren’t familiar with or you might need to learn more about a place’s history or background to give your piece greater context. Research will allow you to create an accurate and well-informed story and help fill in the gaps in your own knowledge. And who knows, you might stumble on something that will inspire your next trip or story. 

Before you begin planning your next trip to the most popular destination of the year, you need to research where everyone has already gone. If you find a lot of articles about solo travel in Brazil, that might mean you need to find a new angle or pick a different place entirely, and down another research rabbit hole you’ll go. 

The arch in Washington Square Park, New York City

Learning as much as you can about the culture and history of the place you’re visiting will undoubtedly deepen your understanding and experience of it. A monument or a park might be pretty and fun to hang out in, but knowing that New York City’s Washington Square Park was built over the graves of 20,000 people makes for both an interesting angle and a more emotionally impactful piece.

Even if you want to write from the perspective of someone going into an experience blind, you still need to do research to travel anywhere — or you’ll end up writing a travelog where you barely find your way out of the airport parking lot. 

While these are the main two skills you should focus on, there are a few more that can give you and your writing a boost. 

Interviewing

A subset of research, learning how to interview effectively will broaden the scope of your knowledge and your writing. Sometimes, you need a perspective other than your own, and who better to tell you about all the hidden secrets of Barcelona than a local? It’s an invaluable skill — especially for a travel writer — to be able to go into a place and speak to people, to get their stories and perspectives so you can go beyond just being a tourist. It’s a way to pull back the curtain and really connect yourself and your reader with the wider world. 

Anthony Bourdain in Parts Unknown

Travel writers do this quite often, and a great example can be seen in Anthony Bourdain’s TV show, Parts Unknown . On the surface, this food travel show showcases the cuisines of the world. But Bourdain’s interests, and thus the show’s, were much more focused on the lives of the people he’d meet along the way. 

If you also want to write in a way that exceeds the usual ‘visit-here-and-eat-that’ humdrum of most so-called travel writing and really start to understand the people you’ll encounter, you’ll need to become a passable interviewer.

Finding people to interview, asking the right questions, and making your interviewee comfortable are the main things that go into conducting a successful interview. Before you go out into the wider world, you can practice with friends, but really, the best way to learn is by doing. Record your interviews or take notes to ensure you don’t forget anything and have quotes to use for when you write your story. And, of course, ask permission before you conduct the interview or use the material.

With your notes and quotes in order, you then need to do the hard part: figure out what’s relevant. You may have dozens of poignant quotes and conversations, but it’s inevitable that you’ll have more raw material than you’ll be able to use. There’s no one right way to make this judgment. It takes time, experimentation, and experience to figure which ones are the best and order them together into one coherent whole. 

Stay up to date with the travel industry

While not necessarily a skill, part of being a good travel writer is being in the know about what’s happening in the travel industry. After all, the larger trends of people’s travel habits, popular destinations, and the state of major airlines and hotels influences the kind of information people are looking for. And it can always serve as inspiration for your next story. There are dozens of industry newsletters you can subscribe to that will keep you apprised of any new developments (including job openings and calls for pitches) in the world of travel, such as Lottie Gross’s Talking Travel Writing . Use them wisely. 

Staying up to date is also knowing where the opportunities to monetize your writing lie. The travel industry is full of affiliate programs and content partnerships, where you can get paid for your work without having to sell it to a publisher or outlet. Your chances of landing these types of deals significantly increase if you have your own blog or social media accounts with a good amount of subscribers, but there may be other opportunities out there as well if you’re savvy.

Even travel writers who don’t consider themselves “influencers” can learn a lot from people creating video content relating to travel topics, especially when it comes to how to make a profit off their content.  If you’re interested in running and making money off your own blog, knowing about programs like these and where to find them is incredibly important. 

Whether you’re looking to get a brand partnership, pitch an online publication, or a guest post on a travel blog, learning the basics of search engine optimization (SEO) and applying it to your writing will help you as you search for opportunities. Essentially, SEO is about optimizing a web page — in this case, your article — to be read by a search engine and draw users to it. It’s no surprise, then, that many publications value writers who have SEO skills and can optimize their articles to bring more traffic to their website.

Learn to take good photos

Besides being a competent and compelling writer, there's another skill that you should look to hone: photography. As much as people enjoy reading about places they’ve never been to, descriptive writing and imagination can only go so far. When it comes to travel, a picture can truly speak more than a thousand words. And a video might be even better. Visual media adds extra color and context to your piece while complementing your writing. 

A man holding up a camera and taking a photo

Depending on whether you’re freelancing or working full-time for a publication, you won’t always have a photographer following you on your journey. Learning the basics of photography can be helpful in those instances and make you a more well-rounded travel writer. In some cases, it might even be attractive to publications if you can provide your own photos. Consider posting what you capture on your personal blog, Instagram, or TikTok as well. Any way of building a following is great.

This doesn’t mean you must invest in a quality DSLR camera (though you certainly can). These days, many smartphones have top-of-the-line cameras that can take the kinds of stunning pictures of white sand beaches and ancient castles that readers are looking for. A beginner’s photography course can help you learn all the basics about lighting, color, and composition and have you snapping great shots in no time. 

📸 Taking plenty of photos can also help you ace your descriptive writing, for those moments when you’re struggling to recall specific details about a place you visited. 

Build a portfolio of work

Once you have a solid foundation of skills, you can begin creating your portfolio. While you might dream of being a staff writer at a travel publication, or make a living as a freelance travel writer, it’s unlikely that you’ll be able to jump straight into that role. 

Find a niche you love

Unsurprisingly, travel writing is a popular choice for aspiring writers. Who doesn’t want to galavant around the world and make a living writing about your adventures? But, of course, that also means it’s a very competitive field, and standing out can be difficult. Finding a way to differentiate yourself will give you a leg up and provide a focus for your articles. 

The great thing about travel writing is that there is a nearly never-ending number of niches you could devote yourself to. You can write exclusively about a certain country or area of the world or gear your work towards a specific audience, such as budget travelers, people traveling with family, or digital nomads. If you have a unique perspective, it’s likely that people will want to read about it. 

That isn’t to say you can’t write outside your chosen subfield. Plenty of writers find success publishing in their niche and then expanding their reach to become a sort of jack of all trades. Having a focus will simply allow you to stand out from the crowd. 

Collect some quality clips

A person writing in a notebook, surrounded by books, a laptop, Polaroids, and a cup of coffee

First, you need to build up a reputation and a solid amount of quality clips — a journalistic term for published articles. They will serve as your resume, showing off your writing and research skills, as well as the topics you’re familiar with and your general style. As you start looking for ways to build your portfolio, internships, freelance opportunities, and blogging can all be great ways to start out. 

💡If you’re curious about the many kinds of work travel writers can do, check out this post about the different types of travel writing . 

📕And if you already have a travel writing blog, you might want to turn your blog into a book that you can pitch to publishers or self-publish.

Look for internships

Internships are a common way writers gain experience and clips. Magazines and online publications may allow aspiring travel writers to flex their skills and learn about what goes into professional travel writing. However, while there are paid internships in this field, many are likely unpaid. Whether you want to pursue an unpaid internship remains up to you, but we recommend valuing your time and pursuing paid internships when you can. 

Consider freelance writing

Another option to consider is freelance writing . Pitching articles to travel publications will not only be a way to gain jobs and clippings but allows you to practice ideation and build up a personal brand, as you are entirely in charge of the topics you’re writing about. It also expands your network of contacts in the industry, which will help you as you continue to pitch magazines and might lead to a job somewhere down the road. 

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Make sure your magazine and contest submissions are prepped to impress.

And if you want to take complete control of your career, a subset of freelancing is blogging. Dozens of freelance travel writers supplement (or make a career out of) running their own personal blog. Having one will give you a ready-made portfolio of clips showing off your skills. This is where having a niche can be especially helpful, as it’s a way to set you apart from all the other travel blogs on the Internet. 

Search for jobs and writing opportunities

With a solid portfolio of clips, it’s time to go out into the world and fully devote yourself to a career in travel writing. There are two main tracks you could take: finding a staff writer position at a magazine or becoming a freelance travel writer. 

Finding full-time travel writer jobs

A man sitting in front of a laptop and thinking

For many writers, the dream is to work full-time as a travel writer for a publication. It offers stability while letting you travel to different destinations to write and explore. 

Although there are many travel-focused magazines like Conde Nast Traveler and Travel + Leisure that might have staff writer positions, don’t discount other publications. Some magazines and newspapers with completely different focuses have travel sections that need staff writers to keep them running. 

For positions like this, a portfolio is especially important. Magazines want to see that writers have a background in journalism and are reliable writers who can deliver good-quality pieces on time. Previously being published is often proof of that. But part of building a portfolio is also building connections with people in the industry. Knowing someone at a magazine who is familiar with your work and can vouch for you can help you get your foot in the door and be hired as a staff writer. 

Freelancing

Another option is to continue down the freelance path, pitching and writing your own stories. This route gives you a lot more freedom. You can decide which places to visit and which activities you want to do, and you’re always in charge of your own itinerary. Overall, you’re much less likely to work on a story you’re not interested in because an editor told you you must. 

This is where picking a niche and having a blog can be especially helpful. Establishing yourself as an authority on a subject will draw people to your articles and give you credibility as you pitch publications. A website dedicated to your niche, with all your expertise located in one place, elevates your credibility and provides a useful resource for your readers — especially if you get a handle on SEO. Eventually, you can even turn your blog into a book and create another revenue stream. 

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The Full-Time Freelancer's Checklist

Get our guide to financial and logistical planning. Then, claim your independence.

Travel writing allows you to indulge in and subsidize your wanderlust and make a living off of it. More than that though, travel writing is a way to connect people across cultures and great distances, and build an appreciation for the uniqueness and diversity around us.

Continue reading

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  • Travel Writing Jobs: 18 Magazines and Blogs that Pay Writers

How Much Do Travel Writers Get Paid?

How do you become a travel writer, 18 paying travel markets, 1. aaa washington, 2. backpacker, 3. backroads, 4. desertusa, 5. escapees magazine, 6. international living, 7. lonely planet, 9. pathfinders travel, 10. porthole magazine, 11. recreation news, 12. road & travel magazine, 14. rvtravel, 15. transitions abroad, 16. texas highways, 17. wanderlust, 18. world nomads, get paid to write for travel markets.

Love to travel and want to write for others who share your passion? Now that the tourism industry is finally starting to show signs of life again, travel writing and blogging jobs are once again becoming ample.

In fact, there are tons of markets in the travel niche that will pay you to write about a variety of topics, from feature articles covering offbeat destinations to tips for planning the perfect family getaway. Some pubs might even commission you to write about your own interesting travel experiences. 

While there’s a common perception that travel writers spend much of their time jet-setting around the world, travel writing jobs don’t always require you to hit the road before you start typing. There are all kinds of gigs available in the travel industry for freelance writers, including some for those just starting out.

Our list here will help you get started if you’re looking to land freelance gigs in the travel niche. But remember that opportunities also abound when it comes to business -writing possibilities in this industry, including travel copywriting, itinerary writing, and guidebook writing-so don’t stop here.

Before we delve into our list of travel writing jobs and travel blogging jobs for freelancers, let’s talk about how you can expect to be paid as a travel writer.

According to Glassdoor , the average travel writer in the United States earns about $54,105 per year. That’s not bad for writing about topics you love.

Of course, how much you actually earn will depend on many factors, including how often you write and for which publications. But the travel industry can certainly be a lucrative niche once you get your foot in the door.

You’ll notice that most of the markets on our list pay competitive rates, often in the $0.25/word range and up.

If you want to become a travel writer, obviously you’ll need a strong interest in travel! It often helps if you have a significant amount of first-hand travel experience, too.

If you’ve decided that this is the niche you want to focus on, it’s time to jump in. 

You can get started by carefully reviewing the markets on our list here and selecting the ones you’d like to pitch. 

After that, your next steps are:

  • Study the submission guidelines 
  • Familiarize yourself with the publication and its style by reading some recently published articles
  • Develop a story idea that aligns with what the editors are looking for
  • Do some research and fine-tune your angle
  • Craft your pitch, and send it off to an editor

If you follow that strategy-and keep pushing forward-you’ll be well on your way to landing solid travel writing gigs.

Check out these 18 travel writing markets that pay writers.

Want to write about the state of Washington? AAA Washington runs a travel-themed website as well as a magazine, Journey , that focuses on destinations in Washington state and northern Idaho. The content is geared toward educating and informing readers about interesting activities, places to go, and places to stay in the region.

Contact: Tweet or email editor-in-chief Jim Hammerand .

Rate: Reportedly pays up to $0.50/word, but freelancers can also pitch a rate.

Backpacker is a bimonthly print and digital magazine focused on foot-based travel-primarily hiking-throughout North America. About 50% of the stories in this pub are written by freelancers, which means there may be opportunities for you. 

Your pitch will have the best chance of being accepted if you’re willing to start off by writing a short assignment for the pages in the departments section. Plan to write an impactful story with a valuable take-away for the reader.

Contact: See the Editorial Directory section in the guidelines and pitch the editor of the section you’re hoping to write for.

Rate: Varies; reportedly $0.25-$0.50/word depending on the section.

Backroads USA is a monthly publication with a focus on motorcycle touring-related guides, tips, and information. The editors look for articles about unique or obscure roadside attractions or eateries and interesting destinations. Note that all feature articles submitted to this pub must be accompanied by high-quality photographs.

Contact: Email the editor .

Rate: $75 and up

Interested in writing about topics related to the North American desert or surrounding regions? Consider pitching DesertUSA. This digital resource features a blog that includes articles about travel, Native American culture, regional history and geology, and southwestern arts and crafts. Note that all writers for this blog are required to provide digital images along with their stories.

Contact: Email or Tweet publisher Jim Bremner.

Rate: $50 per article

Escapees is a bimonthly magazine geared toward RVers who enjoy traveling and exploring. They seek general interest RV-related topics, how-to articles, photo features, profiles, and other travel features. All freelance submissions will need to include photos, and stories should be written in a conversational tone. One particularly nice perk of writing for this mag is that they reimburse the expenses of writers on assignment.

Pay: $25-$200 per story

Contact: Email assistant editor Kelly Evans-Hill . 

International Living offers both a blog and a magazine geared toward helping people retire affordably by living abroad. They need interviews, reviews of relevant new products, how-to guides, and travel features. 

Rate: $250-$400 for print articles; usually about $0.10 per word for blog/website articles.

Contact: Email editorial director Eoin Bassett to pitch a print article or contact digital editor Annie Hannon to pitch a blog post.

Lonely Planet is a travel adventure-themed website that publishes feature content, daily news stories from around the world, and guidebooks. The editors are particularly interested in receiving pitches for inspirational, visually pleasing content. 

Rate: Varies; up to $0.30/word according to reports on WhoPaysWriters

Contact: Tweet editor-at-large Sebastian Modak or reach out via email .

8. Oregon Coast Magazine

Oregon Coast is a bimonthly magazine focusing on the coastal region of Oregon. Both new and established writers are invited to submit pitches. Regularly featured topics include community profiles, driving or walking tours, special events, historical pieces, nature, and restaurant features.

Contact: Send an email to editor-in-chief Rosemary Camozzi .

Rate: $100+ depending on the word count and type of story

Pathfinders is a travel magazine geared toward people of color. Its goal is to help readers plan where to travel and how to get there, what to do while at their destination, and where to dine or stay. All articles from new writers must be submitted on spec unless agreed otherwise, meaning that a completed article must be sent in.

Contact: Email editor P.J. Thomas .

Rate: $150 per article

The cruise industry is finally beginning to rebound after a very tough year. If you’re knowledgeable about cruises and want to write about topics that entice readers to travel by cruise ship, consider pitching this pub. Regular article themes include personal experience stories, how-to guides, historical and general interest stories, and travel features about destinations that can be reached by ship. Porthole pays for the travel expenses of writers on assignment.

Contact: Send a message to Editor-in-Chief Bill Panoff or email a pitch to [email protected] .

Rate: Varies; generally pays $500-$600 for assigned feature stories

Recreation News provides travel coverage with an emphasis on destinations in the Mid-Atlantic (including Delaware, Pennsylvania, Washington D.C., Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia). They publish print and digital editions as well as a weekly newsletter. Pitch an interesting, conversational article that focuses on a specific locale with details about places to stay and eat. The editors state that they especially like to publish articles pertaining to outdoor recreation of any kind. Note that any seasonal articles need to be submitted at least ten months in advance. 

Contact: Email Editor Marvin Bond

Rate: $50-$300

Road & Travel Magazine is an online publication featuring topics about automotive, travel, and personal safety. This pub’s mission is to help readers make informed decisions when it comes to planning trips, staying safe on the road, and purchasing vehicles. While articles are intended to appeal to a wide variety of readers, the target audience is women ages 29-59. 

Contact: Reach out to editor-in-chief Courtney Caldwell via email or LinkedIn .

Rate: Varies; typically up to $100

Want to write about road travel? Check out Rova -a digital and print magazine that emphasizes embracing life on the highways and byways of North America. Millennials and Gen-Xers are the target audience for this mag, and the editors seek articles with a focus on the ways in which roads connect people to places and experiences.

Contact: Send a message to editor-in-chief Gemma Peckham on LinkedIn or fill out the pitch submission form.

Rate: $200 per article

RVTravel is a website that features a blog and other content related to camping and the RV lifestyle. They accept submissions of full articles as well as pitches for stories, press releases, and even poems. If your article is successfully published, there’s a chance you could be brought on as a regular paid contributor or columnist.

Contact: Send a message to editor Chuck Woodbury or submit your idea via the pitch form .

Rate: Undisclosed

Transitions Abroad is an online resource for people interested in traveling to work, study, volunteer, teach, or intern. Regularly published articles cover topics such as worldwide bargains for travelers on a budget; how-to guides related to living, working, and studying abroad; and features about travel opportunities and community-organized tours.

Contact: Contact editor Gregory Hubbs on LinkedIn or send your pitch via email .

Rate: $50-$150 per post.

If you live in Texas or have strong familiarity with the state, consider pitching Texas Highways . The official travel magazine of Texas, this publication is geared toward all Texans and everyone who is interested in exploring the state. Review the guidelines carefully and consider pitching a story about Texas culture, history, or scenery; a small town; or a hidden gem.

Contact: Message managing editor Matt Joyce on LinkedIn or send your pitch via email .

Rate: Up to $0.50/word

Wanderlust is a UK-based website and print publication that seeks articles about unique, intriguing destinations around the world. Regular topics include destination features, trip planner features, advice articles, and shorter “pocket guide” and “dispatch” pieces.

Rate: Pay varies but averages around $0.25 per word.

Contact: Message managing editor Tom Hawker on LinkedIn or send an email .

World Nomads publishes content about transformative travel-related experiences in the form of authentic, personal narratives. Pitch a story that describes a life-changing journey and how it affected you, the way you view the world, and what you learned from the experience.

Contact: Reach out to managing editor Kate Duthie on LinkedIn or via email .

Rate: $0.50/word

If you’re looking to land work as a travel writer, dive right in.

This list gives you a good jumping-off point, but there are lots of ways to land work in this niche. Competition for popular travel magazines can be fierce, so consider pitching some of the lesser-known pubs where you’ll have the best chance of finding success.

Always read the guidelines for any market very carefully. You’ll often have the best chance of breaking in if you start out by pitching a shorter article. In some cases, the editors even provide specific guidance about which sections you should aim to write for if you’re a new prospective writer for their publication.  Once you prove yourself, you can often move up to higher-paying assignments.

Study the potential client or market, do your research, and submit your pitch. Then keep going. That’s the way to launch a career as a travel writer.

Christin Nielsen is a freelance writer based in Virginia. She specializes in writing for digital and print publications as well as nonprofit organizations.

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What Does a Travel Writer Do?

Find out what a travel writer does, how to get this job, and what it takes to succeed as a travel writer.

travel writer careers

Travel writers are responsible for producing content about travel destinations, attractions and activities. They may write articles that appear in magazines or newspapers, create web content for travel-related websites, or produce other types of media such as videos or podcasts.

Travel writing is a relatively niche field, so most travel writers have a specialty area they focus on. This might be a particular type of destination (e.g., tropical islands), activity (e.g., scuba diving), or industry (e.g., luxury travel).

Travel Writer Job Duties

A travel writer typically has a wide range of responsibilities, which can include:

  • Completing research on destinations, events, and travel trends in order to write engaging content that appeals to readers
  • Writing travel articles, blog posts, and other content for publications such as magazines, newspapers, websites, or television shows
  • Interviewing experts in the travel industry, such as hotel managers or cruise line executives, to gather information for stories
  • Conducting interviews with local residents to learn more about the area’s culture, traditions, and attractions
  • Conducting interviews with clients about their experiences with travel products or services for marketing purposes
  • Reviewing potential travel destinations to determine which should be included in future articles or guides
  • Preparing drafts of articles, including researching topics, interviewing experts, writing articles, and submitting work to editors for review and revision
  • Interacting with readers through social media channels such as Facebook or Twitter to promote content and respond to inquiries
  • Writing travel articles that appeal to specific audiences, such as families or business travelers

Travel Writer Salary & Outlook

Travel writers are typically paid based on the length of their article, the publication they are writing for, and their level of experience.

  • Median Annual Salary: $76,500 ($36.78/hour)
  • Top 10% Annual Salary: $143,000 ($68.75/hour)

The employment of travel writers is expected to grow at an average rate over the next decade.

Travel writing will continue to be a popular career choice for those who enjoy writing and want to share their experiences with others. However, the growth rate for travel writers will be limited by the increasing popularity of blogs and other online platforms that allow people to write about their travels for free.

Travel Writer Job Requirements

To become a travel writer, you may need to have the following:

Education: Travel writers typically need a bachelor’s degree in journalism, English, creative writing or another related field. Some employers may hire candidates who have an associate’s degree or who have taken courses in travel, writing or journalism.

Training & Experience: Travel writers often have a background in writing and a degree in English or journalism. They may also have experience in a related field, such as teaching or working in the travel industry.

Travel writers can also gain training through internships. Internships provide valuable experience in the field and can help you make valuable connections with travel editors. They also allow you to learn more about the travel industry and the various aspects of travel writing.

Travel writers can also take courses to improve their skills. Many courses are available online, and some writing organizations offer seminars and conferences.

Certifications & Licenses: Some employers may require travel writers to have professional certification. Travel writers can also earn certifications to increase their knowledge of travel writing and increase their earning potential.

Travel Writer Skills

Travel writers need the following skills in order to be successful:

Research skills: Travel writers research destinations, transportation, accommodations and activities. They also research the best ways to get from one place to another, the best times to travel and the best ways to save money on travel. This research can help them create more effective travel articles.

Communication skills: Travel writers often communicate with their editors, clients and other travel writers. Having strong communication skills can help you build relationships with others and work more efficiently. You can also use your communication skills to write emails, letters and other documents.

Creative writing skills: Travel writers use creative writing skills to create engaging stories that their audience finds interesting. They use creative writing skills to describe their experiences and the places they visit. They also use creative writing skills to create compelling headlines and subheadlines that encourage readers to continue reading their work.

Editing skills: Travel writers often edit their own work, so it’s important to have strong editing skills. You can use these skills to check for grammar, punctuation and spelling errors. You can also use editing skills to check for flow, meaning and consistency.

Knowledge of travel industry: Travel writers often have a background in the travel industry, including knowledge of the various types of travel, the various destinations available and the various methods of travel. This background can help you understand what topics are most appealing to your audience and what types of information they’re most interested in.

Travel Writer Work Environment

Travel writers may work for magazines, newspapers, online publications, or as freelancers. They usually work from an office, although they may travel to different locations to gather information for their articles. Many travel writers work on a freelance basis, which gives them the flexibility to set their own hours and work from home. However, freelancers may have to work longer hours to meet deadlines and may have to travel on short notice. Travel writers usually have to meet tight deadlines and may have to work on weekends and holidays.

Travel Writer Trends

Here are three trends influencing how travel writers work. Travel writers will need to stay up-to-date on these developments to keep their skills relevant and maintain a competitive advantage in the workplace.

The Growth of the Digital Travel Industry

The digital travel industry is growing rapidly, and this is having a significant impact on the travel writing industry. As more and more people book their trips online, writers need to be able to write content that appeals to the digital traveler.

This means that writers need to be familiar with the latest trends in technology and social media, as well as the best ways to market themselves online. In addition, they need to be able to create content that is both informative and engaging for readers.

More Focus on Experiences Over Products

As consumers become more interested in experiences over products, travel writers will need to focus on providing information about these experiences.

Travel writers can capitalize on this trend by developing expertise in specific destinations or types of experiences. They can also focus on creating content that helps travelers plan their trips, such as reviews of hotels, restaurants, and attractions.

A Greater Emphasis on Personalization

As customers become more accustomed to personalized experiences, businesses are beginning to realize the importance of personalizing their interactions with them. This is especially true in the travel industry, where customers often have a lot of choice when it comes to where they want to go and what they want to do.

Travel writers can capitalize on this trend by becoming experts in personalization. They can do this by understanding how to create content that speaks to individual customers and by learning how to use data to target ads and offers.

How to Become a Travel Writer

A travel writer career can be a great way to see the world and make money at the same time. However, it’s important to understand that there are many different ways to become a travel writer. Some people start their careers by writing for online publications or blogs, while others write for print magazines or newspapers.

No matter which path you choose, it’s important to have a strong portfolio of work to show potential employers. This could include articles, blog posts, photos, videos, or any other type of content related to travel. You should also build relationships with other writers, editors, and photographers in the industry. This will help you get your name out there and land more writing jobs.

Advancement Prospects

There are many ways to advance your career as a travel writer. One way is to move up within the company you are currently working for. This may involve taking on additional responsibilities, such as managing a team of writers or overseeing larger projects.

Another way to advance your career is to move to a different company, either in the same field or a related one. For example, you could move from a position as a travel writer to a position as an editor for a travel magazine. Or, you could move from a position as a travel writer for a tour company to a position as a marketing manager for the same company.

You could also advance your career by starting your own travel writing business. This would involve finding clients and writing articles or books for them. As your business grows, you could hire other writers to work for you.

Finally, you could advance your career by becoming a travel writing instructor. This would involve teaching other people how to write about their travel experiences.

Travel Writer Job Description Example

Do you have a passion for writing and a desire to see the world? If so, we want to hear from you! [CompanyX] is looking for a travel writer to join our team and share their experiences with our readers. As a travel writer for [CompanyX], you will be responsible for researching and writing articles on a variety of travel-related topics, such as destination guides, hotel and restaurant reviews, travel tips, and more. You will also be responsible for taking high-quality photos and videos to accompany your articles. The ideal candidate will have excellent writing and research skills, as well as a strong interest in travel.

Duties & Responsibilities

  • Write original articles on a variety of travel-related topics, including destination spotlights, hotel and restaurant reviews, tips for budget-minded travelers, and more
  • Research destinations thoroughly before writing to ensure accuracy of information presented
  • Incorporate SEO best practices into all articles to increase web traffic
  • Take high-quality photos to accompany articles when possible
  • Edit and proofread all articles before submission
  • Adhere to strict deadlines set by the editor
  • Query editors with story ideas on a regular basis
  • Attend industry events and familiarization trips when possible to gather first-hand knowledge of destinations
  • Keep up-to-date on current trends in the travel industry
  • Share articles across social media platforms to increase reach
  • Maintain an active blog on a related topic
  • Perform additional duties as assigned

Required Skills and Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree in English, journalism, or related field
  • 3-5 years professional writing experience
  • Exceptional writing and research skills
  • Ability to work independently and with a team to meet deadlines
  • Excellent organizational skill and multitasking ability
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, and Adobe Acrobat Pro

Preferred Skills and Qualifications

  • Social media or content marketing experience a plus
  • Proofreading experience and familiarity with standard style guides a plus
  • Experience working with content management systems, WordPress, etc.
  • A keen eye for detail and appreciation of great design
  • Familiarity with the travel industry

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Love Exploring

Love Travel? These Are the Best Jobs to Apply For

Posted: May 13, 2023 | Last updated: July 12, 2023

Do you have itchy feet? Longing to get away from the daily 9-5 grind? Well, you might not need to leave your job behind to see more of the world. There are plenty of roles out there that not only involve travel but demand it. Some careers can take you to incredible places, and your skills or hobbies may allow you to combine work with pleasure. We take a look at some top travel jobs for globetrotters.

Live the dream with these travel jobs

<p>Arguably the glamorous pin-up of travel jobs, being a pilot guarantees you see a huge part of the world and get plenty of kudos while you're at it. If flying is your passion then there's no other job like it. Pilots can be well remunerated along with being well-traveled, but the amount of training is intense (and hugely costly) as is the on-the-job pressure and responsibility.</p>  <p><strong><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/gallerylist/70531/how-to-become-a-pilot">Find out what it takes to be a pilot</a></strong></p>

Commercial pilot

Arguably the glamorous pin-up of travel jobs, being a pilot guarantees you see a huge part of the world and get plenty of kudos while you're at it. If flying is your passion then there's no other job like it. Pilots can be well remunerated along with being well-traveled, but the amount of training is intense (and hugely costly) as is the on-the-job pressure and responsibility.

Find out what it takes to be a pilot

<p>Love snowsports? You could live the dream and earn money as you teach people to ski or snowboard by day at a ski school (sneaking in some slope time when you can) and enjoy the après-ski by night. You'll need qualifications, which can be expensive, and hands-on ski instruction experience. The hours can be long and work repetitive, but you're out on the mountains doing what you love. It's mostly seasonal work but some people make a career out of it.</p>

Ski instructor

Love snowsports? You could live the dream and earn money as you teach people to ski or snowboard by day at a ski school (sneaking in some slope time when you can) and enjoy the après-ski by night. You'll need qualifications, which can be expensive, and hands-on ski instruction experience. The hours can be long and work repetitive, but you're out on the mountains doing what you love. It's mostly seasonal work but some people make a career out of it.

<p>Are you chatty, enthusiastic and full of energy? Super-organized, good at remembering things and calm in a crisis? Then being a tour guide could be the job for you. If you're passionate about travel and love people, it's a fantastic way to make a career out of exploring the world. The job entails a lot of responsibility and you'll need to put your best game face on even when dealing with the most awkward customers, but do your job well and you could forge a rewarding career out of travel.</p>  <p><strong><a href="http://bit.ly/3roL4wv">Love this? Follow our Facebook page for more travel inspiration</a></strong></p>

Are you chatty, enthusiastic and full of energy? Super-organized, good at remembering things and calm in a crisis? Then being a tour guide could be the job for you. If you're passionate about travel and love people, it's a fantastic way to make a career out of exploring the world. The job entails a lot of responsibility and you'll need to put your best game face on even when dealing with the most awkward customers, but do your job well and you could forge a rewarding career out of travel.

Love this? Follow our Facebook page for more travel inspiration

Successful travel snappers seek out some of the world's most amazing sights and incredible people to photograph as part of their day job. This super glamorous but highly-competitive career choice demands long days and a lot of time on the road in order to capture that perfect shot for book and magazine publishers, websites, online stock libraries or brand campaigns. But if you're talented with a distinctive style, passionate and determined, you too could be living the dream.

Travel photographer

<p>No matter how well-traveled you are, you could get serious wanderlust planning other people's vacations, but luckily most good travel agencies require their advisers to do their homework. And that means visiting the destinations and properties they're selling on 'fam' (familiarization) trips. First-hand experience is key in establishing trust with a client, after all, especially if you're creating a bespoke trip-of-a-lifetime for a discerning client.</p>

Travel agent

No matter how well-traveled you are, you could get serious wanderlust planning other people's vacations, but luckily most good travel agencies require their advisers to do their homework. And that means visiting the destinations and properties they're selling on 'fam' (familiarization) trips. First-hand experience is key in establishing trust with a client, after all, especially if you're creating a bespoke trip-of-a-lifetime for a discerning client.

<p>Planning overseas events or jaunts for the super-rich is all part of the service for luxury concierge companies. Whether it's booking private jets, staffing a super yacht, gaining the exclusive use of a hotel or booking a top chef to cook in their Mediterranean villa, a bulging contact book of global fixers is the hallmark of a successful concierge and that involves plenty of face-to-face time.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/news/135541/airline-upgrades-flying-holidays-2022"><strong>These airline upgrades are worth the money</strong></a></p>

Luxury concierge

Planning overseas events or jaunts for the super-rich is all part of the service for luxury concierge companies. Whether it's booking private jets, staffing a super yacht, gaining the exclusive use of a hotel or booking a top chef to cook in their Mediterranean villa, a bulging contact book of global fixers is the hallmark of a successful concierge and that involves plenty of face-to-face time.

These airline upgrades are worth the money

<p>Work in hospitality and have your sea legs? Then how about casting away on a cruise ship? These amazing floating resorts require masses of manpower with one ship often employing a crew of thousands. Whether you're front of house in guest services or behind the scenes in IT, you'll make some incredible ports of call and have free time on-shore. Don't fancy it as a career? If you're an expert on a particular topic you could dip your toe in by delivering lectures to passengers in return for a ticket to ride.</p>

Cruise ship worker

Work in hospitality and have your sea legs? Then how about casting away on a cruise ship? These amazing floating resorts require masses of manpower with one ship often employing a crew of thousands. Whether you're front of house in guest services or behind the scenes in IT, you'll make some incredible ports of call and have free time on-shore. Don't fancy it as a career? If you're an expert on a particular topic you could dip your toe in by delivering lectures to passengers in return for a ticket to ride.

A jet-set lifestyle is par for the course for flight attendants who can travel to hundreds of different places during their career. The hours can be long and erratic, and the work isn't always easy but close friendships are forged with fellow crew and overseas adventures are had aplenty with layovers in some lovely locations. Plus, you may well get the added perk of discounted flights for you and your close friends and family.

Flight attendant

Teaching English abroad is a fantastic way to see the world and there are plenty of opportunities for native English speakers looking to teach overseas. You'll need a qualification – a Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) or a Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults (CELTA) – but once you have that under your belt you can earn money as you get to live, work and play in a range of different countries and meet many new and interesting local people.

Teaching English overseas

<p>Got a scuba diving instructor qualification? Why not take the plunge and go professional? From leading wreck diving expeditions in the Caribbean to exploring Indonesia's unspoiled reefs, you'll get paid to dive in astonishing places and forge fantastic friendships while you're at it. The hours can be long, responsibility huge and work repetitive, but if you love diving this a fantastic way to live in beautiful places while getting to see the wonders of the (underwater) world.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleryextended/69131/stunning-photos-of-the-worlds-most-spectacular-shipwrecks?page=1"><strong>Check out the world's most spectacular shipwrecks</strong></a></p>

Scuba diving instructor

Got a scuba diving instructor qualification? Why not take the plunge and go professional? From leading wreck diving expeditions in the Caribbean to exploring Indonesia's unspoiled reefs, you'll get paid to dive in astonishing places and forge fantastic friendships while you're at it. The hours can be long, responsibility huge and work repetitive, but if you love diving this a fantastic way to live in beautiful places while getting to see the wonders of the (underwater) world.

Check out the world's most spectacular shipwrecks

<p>Flying first-class, reviewing luxurious hotels and filing copy as you dangle your toes in an infinity pool with a cocktail in hand… Not quite, but there's no doubt that being a freelance travel writer for a newspaper, website or magazine is an exciting and coveted job that opens up the world and is as far removed from the desk-bound 9-5 as could be. But it's not all freebies and glamour, plus it's hugely competitive and far from lucrative.</p>

Travel writer

Flying first-class, reviewing luxurious hotels and filing copy as you dangle your toes in an infinity pool with a cocktail in hand… Not quite, but there's no doubt that being a freelance travel writer for a newspaper, website or magazine is an exciting and coveted job that opens up the world and is as far removed from the desk-bound 9-5 as could be. But it's not all freebies and glamour, plus it's hugely competitive and far from lucrative.

<p>See the world while trying to make a positive difference to it by working for an international aid organization. A whole range of professional skills are in demand for both short and long-term postings, particularly health professionals, teachers and engineers. The <a href="https://www.redcross.org.uk/">British Red Cross</a>, for example, sends humanitarian workers on missions to provide medical and financial care in global conflict and crisis zones.</p>

Humanitarian worker

See the world while trying to make a positive difference to it by working for an international aid organization. A whole range of professional skills are in demand for both short and long-term postings, particularly health professionals, teachers and engineers. The  British Red Cross , for example, sends humanitarian workers on missions to provide medical and financial care in global conflict and crisis zones.

<p>Similar to a travel writer, this sounds like a dream gig for maintaining a globetrotting lifestyle and it can be. But it can also be lonely, exhausting and daunting. It's all about getting detailed and practical information so they can accurately recommend where to stay, eat, how to get there and things to see and do. Travel writers cover a huge amount of ground often within tight deadlines, so while there might not be much downtime by the pool, they certainly clock up the mileage and adventures. </p>

Guidebook author

Similar to a travel writer, this sounds like a dream gig for maintaining a globetrotting lifestyle and it can be. But it can also be lonely, exhausting and daunting. It's all about getting detailed and practical information so they can accurately recommend where to stay, eat, how to get there and things to see and do. Travel writers cover a huge amount of ground often within tight deadlines, so while there might not be much downtime by the pool, they certainly clock up the mileage and adventures. 

<p>Love surfing, windsurfing, kitesurfing, paragliding, kayaking or stand-up paddleboarding at the weekend? Whatever high-adrenaline activity you love to do there's bound to be a way to make some money out of your hobby while you hop around the world's best beaches. You'll need to complete some globally recognized watersports instructor training but once you have that, the world's oceans are your oyster.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleries/96347/the-worlds-empty-and-beautiful-beaches-from-above?page=1"><strong>These are the world's most beautiful beaches from above</strong></a></p>

Watersports instructor

Love surfing, windsurfing, kitesurfing, paragliding, kayaking or stand-up paddleboarding at the weekend? Whatever high-adrenaline activity you love to do there's bound to be a way to make some money out of your hobby while you hop around the world's best beaches. You'll need to complete some globally recognized watersports instructor training but once you have that, the world's oceans are your oyster.

These are the world's most beautiful beaches from above

<p>Are you fearless in the face of danger? Have an encyclopedic knowledge and utter passion for the natural world? Then working as a safari guide could be the job for you. Spending days in the wilderness, tracking animals and escorting excited guests around the African bush has plenty of appeal, but it's also very hard to get into. However, train to be a field guide and put in the hours to get the necessary hands-on experience and you may be successful at getting a sought-after post.</p>

Safari guide

Are you fearless in the face of danger? Have an encyclopedic knowledge and utter passion for the natural world? Then working as a safari guide could be the job for you. Spending days in the wilderness, tracking animals and escorting excited guests around the African bush has plenty of appeal, but it's also very hard to get into. However, train to be a field guide and put in the hours to get the necessary hands-on experience and you may be successful at getting a sought-after post.

<p>Another way to earn money doing what you love doing is by starting a travel blog – documenting your weird and wonderful overseas adventures through blogs, photographs, video and social media content as you roam. With a huge amount of people now at it, you'll need a compelling USP and strong business strategy in order to make it both engaging and commercially viable. But get it right and you could spend your life writing missives from the road. </p>  <p><a href="http://www.loveexploring.com/news/65956/what-its-really-like-to-be-a-travel-blogger"><strong>Find out what it's really like to be a travel blogger</strong></a></p>

Travel blogger

Another way to earn money doing what you love doing is by starting a travel blog – documenting your weird and wonderful overseas adventures through blogs, photographs, video and social media content as you roam. With a huge amount of people now at it, you'll need a compelling USP and strong business strategy in order to make it both engaging and commercially viable. But get it right and you could spend your life writing missives from the road. 

Find out what it's really like to be a travel blogger

<p>Want to dedicate your career to conserving and protecting wildlife? There are plenty of opportunities to work internationally for successful conservationists who get to venture into amazing habitats around the globe in search of incredible creatures and plants. Joining a volunteer conservation expedition, like with <a href="https://iprescue.org/">International Primate Rescue</a> in South Africa, is a great way to gain hands-on experience and to see if this could be the new career for you.</p>

Wildlife conservationist

Want to dedicate your career to conserving and protecting wildlife? There are plenty of opportunities to work internationally for successful conservationists who get to venture into amazing habitats around the globe in search of incredible creatures and plants. Joining a volunteer conservation expedition, like with  International Primate Rescue  in South Africa, is a great way to gain hands-on experience and to see if this could be the new career for you.

<p>Bag a job on-board a luxury train such as the Venice Simplon-Orient-Express, Belmond Royal Scotsman or Rocky Mountaineer and you will get to whizz through some spectacular locations around the world while you work. Whether you're the train driver, steward or housekeeper, you will be on duty for long hours, but there are certainly worse views to be had from an office window. </p>  <p><strong><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleries/66084/port-lockroy?page=1">This is what it's like to work at the end of the world</a></strong></p>

Train driver or steward

Bag a job on-board a luxury train such as the Venice Simplon-Orient-Express, Belmond Royal Scotsman or Rocky Mountaineer and you will get to whizz through some spectacular locations around the world while you work. Whether you're the train driver, steward or housekeeper, you will be on duty for long hours, but there are certainly worse views to be had from an office window. 

This is what it's like to work at the end of the world

<p>Know your pinot from your plonk? Take it one step further and qualify as a sommelier and you could find yourself swanning off to wine growing regions around the world in search of delicious drops to put on your wine list, all in the line of work. And the skills of a high-caliber sommelier are highly sought after by luxury hotels and fine dining restaurants across the globe.</p>

Know your pinot from your plonk? Take it one step further and qualify as a sommelier and you could find yourself swanning off to wine growing regions around the world in search of delicious drops to put on your wine list, all in the line of work. And the skills of a high-caliber sommelier are highly sought after by luxury hotels and fine dining restaurants across the globe.

<p>Are you fluent in more than one language? Then perhaps you can put your linguistic gift to good use and forge a career in it. It takes more than just knowing a language though; it's important to understand the country's culture so you're abreast of cultural nuances and familiar with accents. Interpreters and translators are employed by a range of travel companies, international and aid organizations around the globe to provide interpretation skills and translate documents.</p>

Interpreter

Are you fluent in more than one language? Then perhaps you can put your linguistic gift to good use and forge a career in it. It takes more than just knowing a language though; it's important to understand the country's culture so you're abreast of cultural nuances and familiar with accents. Interpreters and translators are employed by a range of travel companies, international and aid organizations around the globe to provide interpretation skills and translate documents.

<p>Great with children and proficient in a second language? Becoming an au pair or nanny for an overseas family can be a fantastic way to live and work in another country. By living with locals you'll really get immersed in the culture while improving your language. Or join a local family that does a lot of overseas travel and you will be taken along for the ride. You might not get much time to enjoy the sights alone, but you'll get bed, board and be paid to see some of the world. </p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleries/142477/worlds-best-familyfriendly-vacations-for-making-memories?page=1"><strong>Take the brood to one of these family-friendly destinations</strong></a></p>

Nanny or au pair

Great with children and proficient in a second language? Becoming an au pair or nanny for an overseas family can be a fantastic way to live and work in another country. By living with locals you'll really get immersed in the culture while improving your language. Or join a local family that does a lot of overseas travel and you will be taken along for the ride. You might not get much time to enjoy the sights alone, but you'll get bed, board and be paid to see some of the world. 

Take the brood to one of these family-friendly destinations

Whether you're voyaging around the Caribbean as a chef on board a super yacht or skippering a bunch of backpackers on a budget Dalmatian flotilla, there is a range of roles for qualified yacht crew. The hours are long and demanding but you get a roof over your head, food and some free time to explore the wonderful places where you moor up.

Hair and beauty therapists

From hairdressers in hotels and masseurs on cruise ships to reiki practitioners in super-luxury spas, highly-skilled hair and beauty therapists are in high demand around the world. Why stick to your local salon or beauty parlor when you could be pampering clients within a tropical spa garden in Bali or snipping hair in one of Sydney's swankiest salons?

<p>Get a foot on the ladder in a management scheme with an international hotel chain and you could be working at a top London hotel one year then find yourself managing a team in a far-flung island in the Seychelles the next. The opportunities for long-term overseas travel postings and meeting people from all over the world while you're at it are endless with the right company.</p>

Hotel manager

Get a foot on the ladder in a management scheme with an international hotel chain and you could be working at a top London hotel one year then find yourself managing a team in a far-flung island in the Seychelles the next. The opportunities for long-term overseas travel postings and meeting people from all over the world while you're at it are endless with the right company.

There are a number of public relations agencies that specialize in the travel industry with clients including tourist boards, hotels, tour operators, airlines and cruises. Really understanding the client's business is absolutely key to this communications role so regional and international travel is very much par for the course. And hosting press trips for travel journalists is also part of a travel PR's job description.

Travel public relations officer

<p>Do you know your ristretto from your macchiato or are you a marvel at mixology? Then you're pretty much guaranteed gainful employment on your overseas travels with experienced baristas and bar staff in demand in vacation destinations, providing you have the right visa of course.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/news/116912/etias-visa-european-union-travel"><strong>Here's how to make sense of the new European travel visa</strong></a></p>

Barista and bar staff

Do you know your ristretto from your macchiato or are you a marvel at mixology? Then you're pretty much guaranteed gainful employment on your overseas travels with experienced baristas and bar staff in demand in vacation destinations, providing you have the right visa of course.

Here's how to make sense of the new European travel visa

<p>Whether it's a winter season for a ski resort, a stint at a campsite in Europe or looking after family guests at an all-inclusive Caribbean resort, being a rep is generally seasonal but a fantastic way to spend a few months working overseas. You'll need to be good at dealing with all manner of requests, and doubtless complaints, while keeping your cool and having a can-do attitude.</p>

Vacation rep

Whether it's a winter season for a ski resort, a stint at a campsite in Europe or looking after family guests at an all-inclusive Caribbean resort, being a rep is generally seasonal but a fantastic way to spend a few months working overseas. You'll need to be good at dealing with all manner of requests, and doubtless complaints, while keeping your cool and having a can-do attitude.

<p>Can you do your job remotely? Then who's to say you couldn't abandon the 9-5 rat race and roam the world with your laptop at your side? All you need are the right skills and fast Wi-Fi. Your typical "digital nomad" tends to be freelance writers, web designers and digital and social marketeers, but that's by no means definitive. Swinging in a hammock by a white sand beach must be conducive to strategic thinking, right? Just leave the Zoom call with your client until you're out of your swimmers.</p>

Digital nomad

Can you do your job remotely? Then who's to say you couldn't abandon the 9-5 rat race and roam the world with your laptop at your side? All you need are the right skills and fast Wi-Fi. Your typical "digital nomad" tends to be freelance writers, web designers and digital and social marketeers, but that's by no means definitive. Swinging in a hammock by a white sand beach must be conducive to strategic thinking, right? Just leave the Zoom call with your client until you're out of your swimmers.

<p>You might not get paid for it, but a stint overseas as a volunteer can be a brilliant cultural experience and give you solid work experience, whether you're a <a href="http://wwoof.net">WWOOFer</a> (Worldwide Work Opportunities on Organic Farms) in Brazil or helping out on a wildlife conservation project in India. Join a volunteer expedition or if you're looking for a career break the <a href="https://www.vsointernational.org">VSO</a> recruits professionals looking to use their skills to help communities. It pays a basic living allowance and covers accommodation and travel.</p>  <p><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/galleries/65411/the-polar-bear-and-other-animals-on-the-verge-of-extinction?page=1"><strong>These are the animals on the verge of extinction</strong></a></p>

You might not get paid for it, but a stint overseas as a volunteer can be a brilliant cultural experience and give you solid work experience, whether you're a WWOOFer  (Worldwide Work Opportunities on Organic Farms) in Brazil or helping out on a wildlife conservation project in India. Join a volunteer expedition or if you're looking for a career break the VSO recruits professionals looking to use their skills to help communities. It pays a basic living allowance and covers accommodation and travel.

These are the animals on the verge of extinction

<p>Similar to blogging, being a travel influencer can be a beneficial way to share your experiences with an ever-expanding audience. You might want to vlog on YouTube, share travel tips on TikTok or post stunning photographs on Instagram – or a mix of all three – all while globe-trotting. It’s worth focusing on a particular topic in this well-saturated industry and stay engaged with your audience to produce the best content.</p>

Travel influencer

Similar to blogging, being a travel influencer can be a beneficial way to share your experiences with an ever-expanding audience. You might want to vlog on YouTube, share travel tips on TikTok or post stunning photographs on Instagram – or a mix of all three – all while globe-trotting. It’s worth focusing on a particular topic in this well-saturated industry and stay engaged with your audience to produce the best content.

Have a love for history and are curious to see what remains hidden from past worlds? Field-based archaeology could be the role for you. You’ll need a history-/archaeology-focused degree and site experience but institutes, universities and other organizations could send you out to excavate Roman ruins in Italy, Incan structures in Mexico or sacred burial pits in Norway. Excavations can take weeks or months but you’ll gain a deeper understanding behind the culture of wherever you are in the world.

Archaeologist

<p>Whether you already work in events or if you’re the one in your group of friends who’s in charge of the vacation itinerary, becoming a wedding planner could see you travel around the globe. OK, it’s pretty demanding and you’ll work around the clock but it gives you a chance to visit some of the most romantic destinations in the world, whether it’s an intimate get-together in Italy or a blow-the-budget extravaganza in Sri Lanka. Once the big day is over give yourself a little extra time for a lot of rest and relaxation.</p>

Wedding planner

Whether you already work in events or if you’re the one in your group of friends who’s in charge of the vacation itinerary, becoming a wedding planner could see you travel around the globe. OK, it’s pretty demanding and you’ll work around the clock but it gives you a chance to visit some of the most romantic destinations in the world, whether it’s an intimate get-together in Italy or a blow-the-budget extravaganza in Sri Lanka. Once the big day is over give yourself a little extra time for a lot of rest and relaxation.

<p>If you work in Human Resources for an international company and fancy a change of environment, many larger companies with overseas branches offer relocation schemes. You may know your role well but it’s vital you can adapt to different cultures and ways of communicating. In doing so you’ll develop global knowledge as well as your career – surely a win-win scenario.</p>

Human Resources worker

If you work in Human Resources for an international company and fancy a change of environment, many larger companies with overseas branches offer relocation schemes. You may know your role well but it’s vital you can adapt to different cultures and ways of communicating. In doing so you’ll develop global knowledge as well as your career – surely a win-win scenario.

<p>Ideal for budget-hungry backpackers and longer-term travelers, working at a hostel is a fun way to earn your keep and meet like-minded people as you go. You’ll work a set number of hours (usually 20-30 hours a week) in a range of roles – housekeeping, reception work, gardening – in exchange for accommodation. Some hostel work includes free meals too; companies like <a href="https://www.worldpackers.com/">Worldpackers</a> can help you look for your ideal role. Make sure you check visa requirements before you apply.</p>  <p><strong><a href="https://www.loveexploring.com/news/92267/common-travel-money-mistakes-holiday-2020-currency-credit-cards">Now find out how to avoid these common travel money mistakes</a></strong></p>

Hostel worker

Ideal for budget-hungry backpackers and longer-term travelers, working at a hostel is a fun way to earn your keep and meet like-minded people as you go. You’ll work a set number of hours (usually 20-30 hours a week) in a range of roles – housekeeping, reception work, gardening – in exchange for accommodation. Some hostel work includes free meals too; companies like Worldpackers can help you look for your ideal role. Make sure you check visa requirements before you apply.

Now find out how to avoid these common travel money mistakes

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Sun Sentinel

City & Shore Magazine | Travel writer and editor Thomas Swick answers…

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travel writer careers

City & Shore Magazine

City & shore magazine | travel writer and editor thomas swick answers all of our questions.

Travel writer and editor Thomas Swick. “It does annoy me that wherever I go, wherever I travel, people have this image of Florida that doesn’t gel with my Florida or the Florida of most of the people I know.”

Thomas Swick is a travel writer and author graced with a cosmopolitan elan to match his far-flung itineraries. A career-long man of the world, Swick has now become quite unabashedly a Florida man.

No, not an outrageous Florida Man from the unending internet memes. Surely not. But — in a change of heart sure to astound anyone (full-disclosure, like myself) who’s known him since he arrived 34 years ago — Thomas Swick has become a Florida man of a rare species: a Florida apologist.

“The more Florida is derided, the more devoted I become to it, in every realm except the political,” he writes in “Florida Man,” an essay in the Winter issue of the prestigious journal, “The American Scholar.” Swick takes the side of a Florida, particularly a South Florida, that the rest of the country only thinks it knows. The essay is a cultured, inside-out appreciation that stares down the out-of-state gawkers who regard Floridians as some bizarro-world punchline.

“It does annoy me that wherever I go, wherever I travel, people have this image of Florida that doesn’t gel with my Florida or the Florida of most of the people I know,” says Swick, 71, over a recent lunch in Fort Lauderdale, his adopted hometown. “If they do read books or articles about Florida, they tend to be sensational. There’s very little about the everyday life of normal people in Florida, and I tried to get a little of that in the essay.”

There, he writes: “Unlike most Floridians, I’m happy that people are moving here. Their presence feels like a confirmation of the validity of the place … and a justification of my long tenure in it. So, except when stuck in traffic, I welcome them.”

Swick has recently been out in that traffic, traveling around the state touting his fourth book, “Falling Into Place: A Story of Love, Poland, and the Making of a Travel Writer.” Published in November, the memoir was named among The Washington Post ’s best holiday-gift books. It culminates with his 1989 arrival in South Florida to begin his “dream newspaper job” as the  Sun Sentinel ’s travel editor, a 19-year-long tenure distinguished by the selection of his work in the first six editions of the anthology, “The Best American Travel Writing.”

“It’s a memoir with a strong sense of place that comprises three stories,” Swick says. “A coming of age story, a geopolitical story and a love story. And it captures three heydays: Journalism’s in the wake of Watergate in the late ’70s; Poland’s heyday, the period of Lech Walesa, Solidarity, and Pope John Paul II; and then travel writing’s heyday.”

Beyond the themes, what elevates the book is Swick’s “virtuoso wordsmanship,” his phrase for the finesse that attracts him to the esteemed authors he reads. Likewise, the architecture of Swick’s own sentences is designed with a precision and elegance of language that possesses as much of a payoff for the reader as it does for the writer: the successful pursuit of the ever-elusive perfect word.

At its dramatic heart, “Falling Into Place” is the story of a young man who traveled behind the Iron Curtain twice for the love of a woman, and ended up having an affair with her country. His love story with Hania, the Polish barmaid he met by happenstance, weaves an intriguing narrative arc across a backdrop of revolution, martial law and the transformation of Eastern Europe.

“I knew when I arrived in Poland that second time, I was witness to history,” Swick says. “It was a golden opportunity. That’s why I wanted to learn the language, learn about the culture, read the writers and really immerse myself in Poland. It all fell into place.”

travel writer careers

The book’s title applies to Swick’s relationship with Hania as well — they’ve been married for 43 years — but it didn’t come easily. Neither did the budding writer’s attempts at getting published, analogized in this excerpt:

“The difficulty of baseball is often illustrated by the fact that the best hitters fail two-thirds of the time. Freelancers have far worse percentages. We go months without a hit, enduring slumps that would end the career of any major leaguer. But we don’t keep averages for the simple reason that one acceptance negates every rejection. It is the great beauty, the saving grace of writing: that all you need is one editor, or one publisher, to say yes, and then everything that came before is rendered immaterial. An acceptance is not just a grand slam, it is a grand slam that, miraculously, erases every strikeout and ground out and pop-up that preceded it.”

Such publishing travails detailed in “Falling Into Place,” Swick admits, were probably less agonizing than finding a publisher for it. After a five-year search, he connected with Rowman and Littlefield, a leading independent publisher.

“The trend in memoirs over the last five years is for what they call misery memoirs — tales of woe, dysfunction, abuse, grief, illness,” Swick explains. “As I was looking for a publisher, I kept thinking, there’s got to be an audience for a book that’s not like those. First of all, a book that engages with the world. Those misery memoirs are introspective. They have a universal quality, but they don’t engage the world outside the United States like my book does. And despite all the hardship, the book is pretty optimistic. So it’s very different from most contemporary memoirs.”

In “Falling Into Place,” as in all of Swick’s travel writing, what informs its sense of place is a sense of its people.

“I think that’s the travel writer’s privilege — to have those personal experiences and share them with those who don’t. I think it’s based on the way I traveled when I was younger. I lived in Poland, Greece and France. And when you live in a place, inevitably you get to know the people.

“And so when I started working as a travel writer, going to places for just a short period of time, I always wanted to try and reenact that by getting to know at least one person. And ideally having an experience with that person.

“It’s not just showing a place through my eyes, but through the eyes of the people who live there.”

Assuming the role of Florida Man — his version — Swick graciously answers our standard set of Quote Unquote questions.

A self portrait of the author, also a cartoonist.

Aside from the weather, what do you enjoy most about South Florida?

The mix of people from all over the country, all over the world. The weather is fairly predictable, but it’s made up for by the inhabitants who are, literally, all over the map.

Aside from the weather, what do you dislike most about South Florida?

The bling — and everything that comes with it.

Are you a beach person or a pool person?

Pool. Nothing against the beach, but I live in a condo so the pool’s more convenient — and less attractive to sharks.

When in your life are you or have you been the happiest?

It’s a tie between 1977 — when, working at my first newspaper job, I fell in love with the woman who would become my wife — and 1989, when we moved to Fort Lauderdale and I began my dream newspaper job.

What do you do when you’re stuck in a traffic jam on I-95?

Listen to SiriusXM: Symphony Hall, Siriously Sinatra, The Beatles Channel, The Coffee House, Willie’s Roadhouse, Bluegrass Junction. Unlike personal playlists, radio is educational — introducing you to the unfamiliar — and capable of producing moments of serendipity.

What music are you listening to now?

‘Millennium of Music.’ It’s a program on Symphony Hall that features music from the thousand years before the birth of Bach. Their website offers old programs that you can listen to for free, so if you want to hear medieval Norwegian folk songs or monks chanting in monasteries — and who doesn’t? — this is the place.

Are you a fan, and if so, of what?

I like most sports, but my favorites are baseball and tennis. They’re not very similar — one’s a team sport, one’s individual — but they both involve balls moving at high speeds before being struck by implements. I’m not a fan of golf, so the fact that the ball is moving must be significant. Go Marlins!

If you had to choose: Beatles or Stones?

Beatles. A much broader range of musical styles and infinitely more imaginative lyrics. Plus, they had a sense of humor.

What are your social media usernames?

My name on everything except X, where I am roostertie. Rooster is the brand name of the kind of tie I wear when I wear ties.

Apple or Android?

Who is your real-life hero or heroine?

Jeanne Meinke, my friend who died two years ago in St. Petersburg, Fla. In addition to being a wonderful illustrator, Jeanne was the sweetest, kindest, gentlest person I have ever known. She took a genuine interest in everyone she met and made the most ordinary person feel unique. That is a gift not many people have.

What car are you driving now?

A 2020 Honda Civic. But I also ride a beach cruiser, and occasionally terrify people on the Riverwalk.

If you had to choose: ‘Rocky’ or ‘Raging Bull’?

‘Raging Bull.’ Art over entertainment.

What do you like most about yourself?

I’m a pretty good observer. I tend to notice things, which is important as a travel writer but also helpful as a human being, as it can make you a little less self-absorbed.

The Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray, (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

What places in South Florida do you recommend to guests visiting from out-of-town?

Do they have a month? I have a Tour of Miami I give to friends who visit, and over the years it’s expanded to include more and more neighborhoods. North of us, Palm Beach is a kind of Disney World of American affluence, and the Morikami museum and gardens is a beautiful, and unexpected, pocket of Japan. Here in Broward, I recommend the Yellow Green Farmers Market [in Hollywood]. It’s got all of South Florida’s richness in one place — and most of it’s edible. The last time we were there, my wife spoke Russian to the man who made her mango smoothie and it seemed a kind of emblematic moment.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

I would be more outgoing. I’ve probably missed out on meeting people, experiencing more, by not having a bigger personality. I tend to let my writing do the talking, which is not the best strategy in an era when fewer and fewer people read.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?

The fact that I’ve been able to make a living as a writer. Except for some years teaching English abroad, all of my jobs have been as a writer of one sort or another. And along the way I’ve written a few books. To my eternal amazement, the dream I had when I got out of college actually came true.

Thomas Swick will speak about “ Falling Into Place” at the Delray Beach Public Library, at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 7. Follow him at thomasswick.com .

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