VW Golf manuals

Volkswagen Golf Owners Manual: Operating Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

Fig. 169 Left-hand side of the multifunction steering wheel: buttons for operating the Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

Conditions for starting the Adaptive Cruise Control

  • The selector lever must be in position D or S or be in the Tiptronic gate. A forward gear, but not 1st gear, must be selected in the manual gearbox.
  • In vehicles with a manual gearbox, the actual speed should be minimum 30 km/h (18 mph) if no speed is stored.

Controlling speed

When switched on, the speed can be stored and set. The stored speed can vary from the speed actually being driven if the distance is being actively controlled.

The mph figures given in brackets in the table relate exclusively to instrument clusters with mile readings.

Stop-and-go traffic and the vehicle automatically pulling away

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

Automatic pulling away is not available for all vehicles and countries.

Setting the distance level

The speed-dependent distance from the vehicle in front can be set to one of 5 levels in the infotainment system   .

In wet road conditions, you should always set a larger distance than when driving in dry road conditions.

The following distances can be pre-selected:

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

When the highest level is reached, the distance returns to the lowest level when the button is pressed again.

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

Setting the driving programme

In vehicles with Driving Mode Selection, the selected driving mode (Driving Mode Selection) can affect the acceleration response   .

The following driving modes can be selected:

The following conditions can prevent the Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) from reacting:

  • If the accelerator is depressed.
  • If no gear is selected.
  • If the ESC is taking corrective action.
  • If the driver has not fastened seat belt.
  • If there is a fault in several brake lights on the vehicle or on a trailer with an electrical connection to the vehicle.
  • If the vehicle is reversing.
  • If the vehicle is travelling faster than approximately 160 km/h (100 mph).

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

  • The ACC may not be able to recognise all driving situations correctly.
  • Leaving your foot on the accelerator will mean that the ACC will not brake automatically. This is because manual acceleration overrides the system.
  • You should always be prepared to brake the vehicle yourself.
  • Observe country-specific regulations regarding the minimum distance.

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

The set speed will be deleted if the ignition or the ACC is switched off.

The ACC is automatically deactivated when the traction control system (TCS) is deactivated.

In vehicles with a start/stop system, the engine is switched off automatically during the stationary phase of ACC and is then restarted for moving off.

Radar sensor

Switch off the adaptive cruise control (acc) temporarily in the following situations, other materials:.

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Adaptive Cruise Control ⁠ 1

Part of the iq.drive safety-enhancing and intelligent technologies.

Adaptive cruise control (ACC) helps drivers maintain a constant speed and distance from the vehicle ahead using sensors to detect other vehicles . 
The system can reduce speed of the vehicle if there is a slower moving vehicle ahead, bring the vehicle to a standstill, and resume speed regulation as long as the vehicle in front is moving again.

Maintain a safe distance

Assists with unintentional tailgating

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) feature allows drivers to maintain a constant speed while also keeping a safe distance from the vehicle ahead using sensors. This helps reduce the stress of constantly adjusting speed and distance, making the driving experience more comfortable.

CGI VW vehicle driving on highway.

Safety and confidence on the road

Adaptive responses for responsible driving

With the ability to slow down or bring the vehicle to a standstill in response to slower moving vehicles ahead, drivers can feel confident that they are driving safely and responsibly. This feature also ensures that drivers can easily resume speed regulation once the vehicle in front starts moving again, making the driving experience smoother and more enjoyable.

The ins and outs of  adaptive cruise control

How it works

Helps you maintain a preset speed and/or preset distance from the vehicle directly ahead. When dealing with traffic on the highway, it uses sensors to detect vehicles ahead of you, helping adjust your speed, and manages the distance between you and what’s in front of you.⁠

Instructions

  • To engage the system, press the ON/OFF button on your steering wheel and then set your speed by accelerating to the desired speed and press the SET button.
  • To increase the set speed by the 1 mph, press the + button. If you press and hold the + button, the speed will increase continuously in 5 mph increments.
  • To decrease the set speed by the 1 mph, press the - button. If you press and hold the - button, the speed will decrease continuously in 5 mph increments.
  • To adjust the following distance from the vehicle in front of you, press the ACC button on your steering wheel. As you press the ACC button, you'll see a change in the number of solid bars in your digital cockpit. The more bars visible, the greater the following distance. You can make the same adjustments using the +/- buttons immediately after pressing the ACC button or in your infotainment screen.
  • To cancel, press the brake pedal or quickly press the cruise control button on the steering wheel.
  • To resume a previously stored speed, press the RES button on the steering wheel.
  • When you accelerate, the ACC function pauses and then resumes as soon as you stop accelerating.
  • Note that, in some conditions, select vehicles may come to a complete standstill. For example, if the vehicle ahead of you comes to a stop, your vehicle will also come to a stop. The stop and go feature is included on all model year 2024 vehicles . For previous generation models , see your owner’s manual for vehicle limitations.

Limitations

  • You must be driving above a minimum speed to activate the system. For some models the minimum speed is 15 mph; for others, it is 20 mph.
  • Only reacts to objects within the sensor’s line of sight; some vehicles such as those depicted below are not detected until they are within the sensor’s line of sight.
  • While all MY22 and newer vehicles can detect pedestrians, only some can detect cyclists. See your Owner’s Manual for your vehicle ’s limitations.
  • Once activated, system only operates between 0 and 95 mph.
  • The following situations can lead to unwanted braking: 
  • Damage to or misalignment of the sensor or sensor mounting.
  • Sensor blockage, which can be caused by ice/snow buildup, dirt, mud or leaves. 
  • Towing heavy trailers or carrying heavy cargo in the rear of the vehicle , which can elevate the front of the vehicle and change sensor angles. 
  • Curvature in the road.
  • The following situations can disable the system:
  • Damage to, misalignment of or blockage of the sensor.
  • Towing heavy trailers or carrying heavy cargo in the rear of the vehicle , which can elevate the front of the vehicle and change sensor angles.
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Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) with predictive cruise control

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) with predictive cruise control

Keeps your distance. And observes speed limits.

Adaptive Cruise Control ACC helps you to maintain a previously set maximum speed and a predefined distance to the vehicle ahead . In conjunction with a navigation system, ACC is enhanced by predictive cruise control and a cornering assist function. ACC can adapt the vehicle speed to the applicable speed restrictions and course of the road (bends, roundabouts, etc.) . In conjunction with the dual clutch gearbox (DSG)*, you can also stay relaxed when driving in traffic jams and stop-and-go traffic . * DSG only in the Touareg

Available in the following models

Polo T-Cross Taigo T-Roc T-Roc Cabriolet Golf Golf Variant Tiguan Tiguan Allspace Passat Variant Arteon Arteon Shooting Brake Touareg*

Adaptive Cruise Control ACC helps you to maintain a previously set maximum speed and a predefined distance to the vehicle ahead . It also features predictive cruise control and cornering assist function. ACC can adapt the vehicle speed to the applicable speed restrictions and course of the road (bends, roundabouts, etc .

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The specified fuel consumption and emission data are determined in accordance with the measurement procedures prescribed by law. 1 January 2022, the WLTP test cycle completely replaced the NEDC test cycle and therefore no NEDC values are available for new type approved vehicles after that date.

This information does not refer to a single vehicle and is not part of the offer but is only intended for comparison between different types of vehicles. Additional equipment and accessories (additional components, tyre formats, etc.) can alter relevant vehicle parameters such as weight, rolling resistance and aerodynamics, affecting the vehicle's fuel consumption, power consumption, CO 2 emissions and driving performance values in addition to weather and traffic conditions and individual driving behavior.

Due to more realistic testing conditions, fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions measured according to WLTP will in many cases be higher than the values measured according to NEDC. As a result, the taxation of vehicles may change accordingly as of 1 September 2018. For further information on the differences between WLTP and NEDC, please visit www.volkswagen.de/wltp .

Further information on official fuel consumption data and official specific CO 2 emissions for new passenger cars can be found in the "Guide to fuel economy, CO 2 emissions and power consumption for new passenger car models", which is available free of charge from all sales dealerships and from DAT Deutsche Automobil Treuhand GmbH, Hellmuth-Hirth-Str. 1, D-73760 Ostfildern, Germany and at www.dat.de/co2 .

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Adaptive Cruise Control distance setting?

  • Thread starter jivemonkey2000
  • Start date Nov 19, 2013

jivemonkey2000

Passed driver's ed.

  • Nov 19, 2013

Hi Taking delivery in a few weeks (hopefully) and interested to know how the distance settings related to the ACC actually translate to day to day use. I've heard that the closest setting is still too far for some people's driving habits? What do people use and find comfortable? On a side note, if the ACC system brings you to a complete stop will this distance stay the same for the entire slowdown to halt? I can imagine that in stop start traffic being 50-100ft behind would be excessive to say the least! Andy  

marvin1

Ready to race!

jivemonkey2000 said: Hi Taking delivery in a few weeks (hopefully) and interested to know how the distance settings related to the ACC actually translate to day to day use. I've heard that the closest setting is still too far for some people's driving habits? What do people use and find comfortable? On a side note, if the ACC system brings you to a complete stop will this distance stay the same for the entire slowdown to halt? I can imagine that in stop start traffic being 50-100ft behind would be excessive to say the least! Andy Click to expand...

Sootchucker

Sootchucker

Go kart newbie.

Distance based on speed, not set figure. Adapts to speed, so 75m at 70mph might adjust to only 10m at 20mph. Correct that only DSG brings you to a halt. Unfortunately when traffic comes to a full stop, ACC seems to pause. When traffic pulls away again, engine starts up again but you have to either hit resume on steering wheel to to remove auto-hold and carry on following the car in front or you have to press the accelerator. Safety override? I find the distances are fine. I am set at 2/3 lines from car./  

Oh I see, having it relative to speed makes a lot more sense. Clue's in the name: Adaptive! I should have mentioned that I will be getting the DSG box on mine (Only just got around the creating my signature) so looking to get a feel for the system before hand. Very interesting reading about this ACC system, I'm sure it will be slightly disconcerting the first few times approaching traffic keeping my foot away from the brake! Hmm..shame it doesn't maintain speed for your entire journey regardless of stopping time and in accordance with speed limits from the Nav system - that would be interesting. The limits certainly seem accurate from what I've seen in the past. Step too far? I also wonder how protected the radar is - 70mph stone smacks into it can't end well.. Thanks for your feedback everyone.  

The radar sensor in the lower bumper is covered by a glass cover. This is a very cheap part to replace if cracked, but if the whole sensor is damaged or knocks out of alignment, well that's a different story (from memory in ETKA, think the radar is about £900 !!).  

Sootchucker said: The radar sensor in the lower bumper is covered by a glass cover. This is a very cheap part to replace if cracked, but if the whole sensor is damaged or knocks out of alignment, well that's a different story (from memory in ETKA, think the radar is about £900 !!). Click to expand...

Distance setting translates into time settings. So inside the computer, time is constant depending on the distance you set. Therefore, very close setting (maybe 1 sec) would mean xx distance to the car in front at 30 m/h, while with same 1 sec at 90 m/h distance increases to whatever calculation gives. Be aware, hopefully you spot it in the manual, ACC does not brake with full power! It is limited in g force, so you have to do it yourself to come to an emergency stop if more brake power is needed. Happened to me few times, you get a nice warning in your dash display.  

Wolksvagen

Sootchucker said: However if you come to a complete halt for more than a couple of minutes, then the ACC automatically deactivates itself, and you will then have the chore of squeezing the accelerator pedal to start moving again Click to expand...
  • Nov 20, 2013

At times I admit to being one of the knob drivers that gets far too close to the car in front yet for me ACC set to the second closest setting is about right. Once you trust the ACC and know exactly what it does and doesn't do, it is very relaxing, especially in motorway traffic. You probably wont want to be so close. If you really need to sit bumper to bumper determined not to let anyone pull into the gap then ACC should be off to be honest.  

scientificharmony

scientificharmony

Go kart champion.

  • Nov 21, 2013

Drag Race Newbie

Don't use it anymore on my daily commutes to & from work where drivers regularly come across the aftermath of one accident per week and witness literally dozens of near misses. With so many vehicles performing last second lane changing and cutting in without warning while trying to turn the road into a demolition derby, the ACC just can't cope. In normal traffic, i.e. non-mindless video game track day conditions, it's great....  

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

WheelsJoint

Home » Tips & Tricks » How to use Adaptive Cruise Control on VW Tiguan

How to use Adaptive Cruise Control on VW Tiguan

Adaptive Cruise Control on Volkswagen Tiguan helps maintain an individually stored constant speed between about 20 miles per hour and 95 miles per hour at a previously set distance in time intervals between your vehicle and those in front of you.

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

To switch on adaptive cruise control, press the on/off button on your steering wheel, the system is now active but no speed is set. To save the current speed when the vehicle is moving, press the SET button.

The set speed appears in the instrument cluster and the adaptive cruise control system begins regulating the speed to help automatically maintain a comfortable following distance to a vehicle in front.

Adjusting distance / gap

The adaptive cruise control system helps maintain the following distance by determining a time interval, resulting in a speed dependent distance. When adaptive cruise control is active, the following distance to the vehicle in front can be adjusted to one of five positions by pressing the adaptive distance button on the steering wheel.

vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

The distance intervals can also be set using the plus or minus buttons immediately after pressing the adaptive distance button.

When a slower moving vehicle directly ahead is detected, adaptive cruise control automatically slows down and helps maintain the distance that has been set. Once the slower vehicle moves out of the way, the system adjusts back to the set speed.

Stop and Go

If the vehicle traveling ahead brakes to a standstill, adaptive cruise control will also brake your vehicle to a standstill. The driver assist system holds your vehicle stationary with the brakes and adaptive cruise control staying active. To drive off after being stationary briefly, press the accelerator, adaptive cruise control will resume speed regulation as long as the vehicle in front is moving again.

Deactivate and resume ACC

To deactivate cruise briefly press the cruise on/off button on the steering wheel, or press the brake pedal. To resume the previously set speed, press the resume button RES .

To increase the speed by one mile per hour, briefly press the plus button or press and hold to increase the set speed in increments of five miles per hour. Press the minus button briefly to reduce speed by one mile per hour, or press and hold to reduce the set speed in increments of five miles per hour.

In addition to the functions of a traditional cruise control system, adaptive cruise control can help speed up or slow down your car to keep a comfortable following distance to the car ahead.

ford-edge-2020

Good useful information.

Marcov

Cruise control goes off when you turn off ignition is there a way to keep it on always? like older models?

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Ride plus Drive

Volkswagen Cars w/ Adaptive Cruise Control (All 11 Models)

Adaptive cruise control has been available mostly in luxury vehicles but is now common in many mainstream cars, including Volkswagens.

The Volkswagen cars, SUVs, and EVs in this post have adaptive cruise control or conventional cruise control system.

Check the corresponding tables to see the relevant model years when the system became available.

volkswagen

Adaptive Cruise Control vs. Cruise Control

The more-basic cruise control in older Volkswagen cars helps the vehicle maintain a steady cruising speed.

Adaptive cruise control (ACC) enhances the conventional cruise control system by adjusting the car’s speed to match the vehicle ahead, slowing or accelerating to the set speed when appropriate.

Newer Volkswagens have the IQ Drive technology that automatically maintains a set distance from the vehicle ahead, with the ability to brake on its own to avoid a potential collision.

Rival mainstream car makers that produce popular models with adaptive cruise control (ACC) include:

  • Toyota vehicles with ACC .
  • Kia vehicles with ACC .
  • Honda vehicles with ACC .
  • Hyundai vehicles with ACC .
  • Nissan vehicles with ACC .
  • Ford vehicles with ACC .

Volkswagen Cars with Adaptive Cruise Control

#1 volkswagen golf.

Although it’s no longer in production after 2021, the Golf hatchback remains a compelling purchase as a used car, with its excellent ride quality and versatile body – even the more-powerful Golf R is a competent daily driver .

All Volkswagen Golf models from 2003 to 2021 had standard cruise control that enabled a steady highway cruising speed.

Only in 2002 when the system first became available was cruise control not available at all trim levels.

#2 Volkswagen Polo

Although the VW Polo isn’t available on American shores, it’s a popular little car sold globally in Europe and many other countries.

Except for the latest generation that debuted in 2022, Volkwagen Polos from 2009 to 2021 had cruise control in the pricier variants, and all pre-2009 models only had the system as an optional add-on.

#3 Volkswagen Beetle

The discontinued Volkswagen Beetle had cruise control as a standard provision from 2012 to 2019.

#4 Volkswagen Jetta

In a class with all-stars like Honda Civic , Toyota Corolla , Hyundai Elantra , and Kia Forte – all with adaptive cruise control – the VW Jetta seems somewhat mediocre.

Still, from 2019 onwards, Volkswagen Jettas have had adaptive cruise control (ACC) in their higher trims and the more-basic cruise control in the lower ones.

Cruise control is standard across all Volkswagen Jettas from 2003 to 2018, with the 2001 and 2002 models only having the system in the more-expensive trims.

#5 Volkswagen Passat

2021 and 2022 Volkswagen Passat sedans have standard adaptive cruise control, while models from 2016 to 2020 only had the system in the higher trims.

Cruise control is standard across all Volkswagen Passat from 2001 to 2015, and older models before that period do not have the cruise management system.

2022 marks this midsize car’s final model year stateside.

#6 Volkswagen Arteon

This 2019 debutant is a unique large hatchback with sleek styling and sporty handling.

All Volkswagen Arteon models have at least the basic cruise control system, with the higher trims carrying the more-sophisticated adaptive cruise control (ACC) before ACC became standard from 2022 onwards.

Volkswagen SUVs with Adaptive Cruise Control

#7 volkswagen taos.

Since its introduction in 2022, the Volkswagen Taos subcompact SUV has had adaptive cruise control in the upper trims and cruise control in the lower ones.

#8 Volkswagen Tiguan

This model stands out among small SUVs with its three rows of seats.

Volkswagen Tiguans from 2018 onwards have had adaptive cruise control or cruise control, depending on the trim level.

All VW Tiguan models from 2009 to 2017 had standard cruise control.

#9 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport

This SUV is a two-row version of the VW Atlas.

Since its 2020 debut, the Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport has had adaptive cruise control in the upper trims and conventional cruise control in the lower ones.

#10 Volkswagen Atlas

This SUV is a three-row midsize, seating up to seven.

Like the two-row variant, the Volkswagen Atlas with an extra row of seats has cruise control in the base trim and the more sophisticated adaptive cruise control in the costlier ones.

Volkswagen Electric Vehicle with Adaptive Cruise Control

#11 volkswagen id.4.

As the German marque’s pioneering electric SUV, Volkswagen ID.4 models have adaptive cruise control with lane centering across all trim levels.

References:

https://www.vw.com/en/models.html

https://www.vw.com/en/iq-drive.html

GearFixes.com

VW Adaptive Cruise Control Problems (Reasons and How to Guide)

As a proud owner of a VW car, you may have experienced the convenience and safety features of Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC). However, even with its benefits, there have been some reports of problems with VW’s Adaptive Cruise Control.

In this article, we will discuss some of the common issues that VW car owners have encountered with their ACC system and provide possible solutions to help you better understand and troubleshoot these problems.

So, if you have been facing any difficulties with your VW’s Adaptive Cruise Control, keep reading!

vw

Common Problems with VW Adaptive Cruise Control

While VW’s Adaptive Cruise Control is designed to provide a seamless driving experience, there have been a few reported issues that may impact its performance.

Some of the most common problems with VW’s ACC system include:

Sudden disengagement of the system

Inaccurate speed control, false alerts and warnings, unresponsive controls, unexpected braking, random acceleration.

One of the most frustrating problems reported by VW car owners is the sudden disengagement of the Adaptive Cruise Control system while driving.

This can be a safety concern, especially on highways and busy roads where consistent speed control is crucial. In such cases, the ACC system may turn off without any warning or apparent reason, leaving the driver to manually adjust their speed.

Reasons: This could be due to various reasons, including technical malfunctions or sensor issues. It can be a cause for concern as it disrupts the smooth driving experience that ACC is designed to provide.

Solutions: If you encounter sudden disengagement of the ACC system, it is recommended to get your vehicle checked by a certified mechanic or visit your nearest VW dealership for assistance.

It’s also essential to follow the proper maintenance schedule and keep all sensors clean to avoid this problem.

Another common issue reported by drivers is inaccurate speed control while using Adaptive Cruise Control. This can lead to unexpected acceleration or deceleration, causing discomfort and potentially hazardous situations on the road.

Inaccurate speed control refers to the ACC system not maintaining a steady speed as set by the driver. It may result in sudden changes in velocity, which can be dangerous, especially in heavy traffic conditions.

Reasons: There can be several reasons for inaccurate speed control on VW Adaptive Cruise Control. One of the main culprits could be a malfunctioning sensor, which may not accurately measure the distance from other vehicles on the road.

Additionally, outdated software or calibration issues can also lead to incorrect speed control by the ACC system.

Solutions: To ensure accurate speed control, it is crucial to keep your vehicle’s sensors and cameras clean at all times. Additionally, always follow the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance schedule for your vehicle.

If you notice any issues with the ACC system, have it checked by a professional immediately.

Aside from inaccurate speed control, another common issue with VW Adaptive Cruise Control is false alerts and warnings.

This can happen when the system detects a potential collision or obstacle on the road, causing it to apply brakes abruptly even if there is no real danger.

False alerts and warnings occur when the ACC system mistakenly identifies a potential collision or obstacle on the road, causing it to react as if there is an imminent danger.

Reasons: False alerts and warnings can occur due to a variety of reasons, including environmental factors such as heavy rain or snow that may obstruct the sensors’ view.

Other common causes include objects on the road that resemble other vehicles, low sensor battery, or issues with the system’s software.

Solutions: To address false alerts and warnings, it is essential to regularly clean and maintain the sensors and cameras of your vehicle’s ACC system.

If you encounter this issue frequently, consider getting the system checked by a certified technician for any underlying hardware or software problems.

In some cases, recalibrating the system or updating its software may also help resolve false alerts.

Another common problem reported by VW owners with adaptive cruise control systems is unresponsive controls. This issue occurs when the system fails to respond to driver inputs, such as adjusting the desired speed or distance from other vehicles.

Reasons: There are several potential reasons for unresponsive controls in a VW adaptive cruise control system. One common cause is dirty or damaged sensors, which may prevent the system from accurately detecting and responding to other vehicles on the road.

Additionally, issues with the system’s wiring or connections can also lead to unresponsiveness.

In some cases, software glitches or malfunctions may cause the controls

Solutions: If you are experiencing unresponsive controls with your VW adaptive cruise control, there are several steps you can take to address the problem.

First, try cleaning the sensors and ensuring that they are not obstructed by any debris or damage.

If this does not solve the issue, it may be necessary to have a technician examine the system for any potential hardware or software problems.

In some cases, a system reset or software update may also help to resolve the issue.

It is important to address any problems with your ACC system promptly and seek professional assistance if needed to ensure safe and reliable operation.

Another common issue reported with VW adaptive cruise control is unexpected braking. This can occur when the system incorrectly detects a vehicle in front and applies the brakes, causing a sudden decrease in speed.

Drivers may also experience this when approaching a curve or exit ramp, where the system mistakenly interprets an obstacle as a vehicle and engages the brakes.

Reasons: There are several potential reasons for unexpected braking in a VW ACC system. One possible cause is a dirty or damaged sensor, which may not accurately detect the distance of other vehicles.

Another reason may be an issue with the software, such as outdated mapping data or incorrect settings.

In some cases, certain weather conditions, such as heavy rain or snow, can also affect the accuracy of the system’s sensors and cause unexpected braking.

Solutions: If you are experiencing any issues with your VW adaptive cruise control, there are several steps you can take to address the problem.

First, make sure all sensors and cameras are clean and free of obstructions. You can also try recalibrating the system by following the instructions in your vehicle’s manual or consulting a professional technician.

In some cases, updating the software may also resolve any issues.

If the problem persists, it is important to have your VW ACC system inspected and serviced by a certified technician to ensure safe and accurate operation.

Additionally, staying informed about any recalls or updates from Volkswagen can help prevent potential issues with your system.

Another common problem reported by VW owners with adaptive cruise control is random acceleration.

This occurs when the system suddenly accelerates the vehicle without any input from the driver. This can be a dangerous and unnerving experience for drivers, especially on busy roads or highways.

Reasons: There are several possible reasons for random acceleration with VW adaptive cruise control. One common cause is a dirty or malfunctioning sensor, which can send incorrect signals to the system and result in unintended acceleration.

Another potential reason could be a software glitch or error, which may require updating or recalibrating the system.

In rare cases, there may be a mechanical issue with the vehicle itself that is causing the random acceleration.

Solutions: If you experience random acceleration with your VW adaptive cruise control, there are a few potential solutions to consider.

First, it is always recommended to have your vehicle inspected by a certified Volkswagen technician to identify and address any underlying issues.

This may involve cleaning or replacing the sensor, updating software, or making necessary adjustments to the system.

In some cases, a simple reset of the system may also resolve the issue.

How does VW adaptive cruise control work?

Now that we’ve covered some common problems with VW’s adaptive cruise control system, let’s take a closer look at how it works.

VW adaptive cruise control uses radar sensors and cameras to monitor the distance between your vehicle and other vehicles on the road.

Based on this information, the system can automatically adjust your vehicle’s speed to maintain a safe following distance.

It can also bring the vehicle to a complete stop if necessary, and resume driving when the traffic ahead moves again.

This technology is especially helpful in heavy traffic or on long highway drives, reducing driver fatigue and stress while maintaining safe driving distances.

Can you turn off the adaptive cruise control VW?

Yes, you can easily turn off adaptive cruise control on your VW vehicle.

Simply press the “Off” button on the cruise control system or use the controls on your steering wheel to deactivate it.

You can also adjust the following distance and set a maximum speed limit for the system to operate within.

If you need to temporarily pause the system, such as in heavy traffic or construction zones, you can also use the “Resume” button to resume adaptive cruise control.

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Guide to Adaptive Cruise Control

How this convenience feature works to reduce your stress on long drives

Illustration of a car safety system

Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is like traditional cruise control, but smarter. ACC systems allow you to set a desired speed until your vehicle encounters slower-moving traffic. Then it will brake to maintain a set distance from the car ahead. Once the traffic starts moving again or if there is no longer a car in the lane ahead, ACC will accelerate to resume the previous set speed. Although ACC systems may take some getting used to, our survey respondents told us they appreciated the stress relief the feature brings.

“I use the feature mostly on the freeway and in stop-and-go traffic. I find it reduces tension and fatigue,” wrote a 2020 Subaru Outback owner. A 2018 Audi Q5 driver agreed. “It is so nice to just set it and let the car worry about the traffic,” they told CR.

The systems use lasers, radar, cameras, or a combination of those. If traffic slows to a stop, most ACC systems will bring the car to a complete stop, then bring it back up to speed when traffic gets going again. Others work only within certain speeds and/or might not start to accelerate automatically.

Adaptive cruise control (ACC): Cruise control that also assists with acceleration and/or braking to maintain a driver-selected gap to the vehicle in front. Some systems can come to a stop and continue while others cannot. If the car comes to a full stop, you may have to press the accelerator or a button on the steering wheel to start moving again.

Not all systems work at low speeds, so drivers who plan to use ACC in slow traffic should check the limitations of any system they plan to buy. These particular systems will often have the words “traffic jam” or “stop and go” in their name.

These features are usually activated using a button on the steering wheel with the image of a car next to a speedometer with an arrow pointing at it. A conventional cruise control system does not automatically keep a set distance away from the car in front, and it is indicated by a similar logo without the car next to the speedometer. A tip to know if your car has adaptive cruise control or regular cruise control is to look for the “gap distance” button, which usually shows a symbol of a car with horizontal distance bars in front. This button will determine how much space your car leaves between its front bumper and the rear of the car it is following.

In our most recent survey, we asked CR members to rate their experiences with the advanced safety and driver assistance systems on their model-year 2017 to 2022 cars. Respondents answered questions about their satisfaction with the systems. The survey covered about 47,000 vehicles. Most respondents told us they were “very satisfied” with ACC. Satisfaction was higher for older drivers.

OVERALL SATISFACTION

What to Look For in an Adaptive Cruise Control System

Every ACC system works slightly differently, says Kelly Funkhouser, manager for vehicle technology at CR. Some do a better job than others at recognizing merging traffic and automatically apply the brakes, while others wait too long to slow your car, requiring the driver to take control—especially when a vehicle in front of you cuts you off with a close merge.

“Most ACC systems can only be set to speeds above 20 mph but will slow the vehicle to speeds below that in stop-and-go traffic,” she says. “There are a few systems out there that don’t bring the car all the way to a stop but instead just shut off at low speeds. That can be dangerous when you’re traveling behind another slowing vehicle.” She recommends reading the automaker’s website closely and learning about the speed ranges before using ACC while on your test drive.

ACC is meant for convenience, not as a replacement for an alert driver, Funkhouser says. So don’t use adaptive cruise control as an excuse to get distracted. “Just because the car is controlling your speed doesn’t mean that you can check out,” she says. “These systems do not do well at detecting or slowing for vehicles ahead if you approach them at a high rate of speed. The driver should always be monitoring the surrounding traffic and looking ahead for potential hazards.”

Keith Barry

Keith Barry has been an auto reporter at Consumer Reports since 2018. He focuses on safety, technology, and the environmental impact of cars. Previously, he led home and appliance coverage at Reviewed; reported on cars for USA Today, Wired, and Car & Driver; and wrote for other publications as well. Keith earned a master’s degree in public health from Tufts University. Follow him on Twitter @itskeithbarry .

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Experiences with lane assist and adaptive cruise control

BlueDH

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vw adaptive cruise control distance settings

From the top of the screen... Lane Assist: A fine idea. But, it's not just useless, but dangerous. There is a road I drive on where one lane splits into two, and there are tar-filled gaps in the concrete that run sort-of along the lanes of traffic. My car tried to "assist" me into a collusion with another car because it was trying to follow those lines. This might be a Texas thing, but this is quite common. I'd love to be able to turn this off permanently. ACC/ Adaptive Cruise Control: Pretty nice when it's on, particularly on the freeway which is it's primary design function. I love to get behind a semi at 65-70 and as close as the ACC will follow. Set the ACC to 72 or so so it'll always keep up, turn on the Travel Assist...and relax while the car does the drudgery. You just have to watch for idiots and hazards, but the truck drivers are professionals and do a great job. It'd be great if the distance could be cut a bit; I'd like it to be 2/3 or even 1/2 the distance for efficiency - but that's a liability no manufacturer will take. Like my previous car, ACC doesn't do well when traffic in front slows to a stop from anything over 10-15MPH, so you've gotta watch that and get ahead of it. Previous car would "see" a stopped car in front of me when I was pulling up behind them. This car won't see that car unless it was already "on the screen" if you will. It's aggravating to pull up behind a car at a light and have to wait to start ACC until I stop. Previous car would let me do this below 10MPH or so every time and bring the car to a smooth stop. First world problem, I know. On the plus side, I love the ability to preselect speeds for ACC. If the buttons weren't the dorky haptic ones, this would be drop-dead simple and useful. I frequently attempt to preselect a speed for the next segment, and will hit the wrong button and engage Travel Assist at the current speed. Invariably, this is about 20MPH below the speed limit for the current road, so when I hit "Resume" and let off the accelerator it's already on and immediately slows to the selected speed. Not cool in traffic, and nothing but a product of the haptic buttons. As it stands now, the speed selection buttons and preselection are distracting and I can't decide if it's a good thing or a hindrance as implemented. Two steps forward, one step back... I've had the ACC do a dangerous thing twice now, I'm working on reproducing the problem. Stop at a light, set a speed and ACC on so it holds the brakes. When the light turns green, poke at the accelerator twice in quick succession - and the car hard stops and switches to park from about 5MPH with no cars in front . Not cool in front of a line of traffic. There's something else that's part of the trigger for this, I just haven't figured it out. Might be me tapping a button on the steering wheel...but of course that's hard to tell because of the haptic buttons. Lane Change System (Side Assist): It's saved my bacon once. I find it far too easy to ignore the lights...but I don't have a way to improve that unless you make the entire mirror flash, or put a ring around it. The real issue is the lights flash so often they fade into the background. Dynamic Road Sign Display: In the US, it's just worthless. I have it displayed with no warnings, but because of completely inconsistent signage it's like a box of chocolates. Front Assist: I haven't had it use the brakes yet - but I'm glad it's there. Previous car had it, and it kicked in a few times. Nice. I have gotten multiple warnings. It's a bit oversensitive, but it's infrequent enough that it doesn't get ignored. Back-up camera and assistance: 10 years ago I'd have poo-poohed this, but it's great. I love getting the warnings that someone is coming, which can occasionally be hard to see in the screen. And being able to see when you're backing out is priceless. Yes, there are some night-time issues (I'm going to play with covering my white license plate and/or the license plate lights soon) but this is good stuff. Also, I back in almost every time. Putting the rear bumper right on the spot every time is excellent. I really do like the display of these systems on the pedestal / above the steering column. In fact, that's one of the things that drew me to this car and away from Tesla. If you can't see what they automation is doing, you're not safe.  

Your experiences and results are like mine and I agree with your conclusions. And thanks for all that information. I'd like to add that where a road widens to accommodate a left hand turn lane occasionally my car tries to turn into that left lane. Since I have learned that "feature", I'm constantly watching out for that situation. I've sometimes had the the side assist warn me from a guard rail on the right and a Jersey barrier on the left.  

BlueDH said: I've sometimes had the the side assist warn me from a guard rail on the right and a Jersey barrier on the left. Click to expand...

I have been playing the TACC (Travel Assist Cruise Control) going to and from work on the NJ Parkway and Turnpike over the past few days. I think it works well but the driver is still in charge - it does not like people who cut in-front of you and it is within the distance you set for the car in front of you. It slows down quite a bit below your set speed and slowly re-accelerates to your set speed. I am assuming the brake lights are being applied when that happens. I also notice it appears to still want to control the steering a little bit - I can feel the wheel adjust occasionally even if the car is between the lines and I have my hands on the wheel, which I always do. I tried to test by taking hands off and within 5 seconds a message displayed to take the wheel. If traffic stops the car will also come to a complete stop but wont start back up unless you put your foot on the accelerator to start moving. I am still learning to trust the systems to see how and how well they work.  

jdkdomain said: I have been playing the TACC (Travel Assist Cruise Control) going to and from work on the NJ Parkway and Turnpike over the past few days. ...it appears to still want to control the steering a little bit - I can feel the wheel adjust occasionally even if the car is between the lines and I have my hands on the wheel, which I always do. Click to expand...

chaseb

Lane Assist is a pain. I am pleased with ACC and Travel Assist so far. A question, what generates the "ghost" vehicles in the left lane in the screenshot above. My displays only cars directly ahead of me.  

chaseb said: Lane Assist is a pain. I am pleased with ACC and Travel Assist so far. A question, what generates the "ghost" vehicles in the left lane in the screenshot above. My displays only cars directly ahead of me. Click to expand...

Perfesser

Like many things in life, if someone asks how you like the IQ features on the car, your response should be, "Compared to what?" Those of us who have never used these features before are comparing the features to cars without them. I have had two cars with similar features, so I compare the ID.4 to those cars. (My prior cars were a Chevy Bolt and a Subaru Outback with Eyesight.) I find the ACC is pretty well sorted-out: smooth and mostly predictable. On the both prior cars, I found that the camera could lose sight of the leading car in a curve. That is a problem when (for instance) you have the ACC set to 55 but traffic has been going 45, and then at a curve in the road, traffic ahead slows even further. If your ACC system loses sight of the car ahead, it may quickly accelerate to your set speed, which is not a good idea on a slow curve. I think the ID.4 keeps a lock on the car ahead better than the Subaru but, because I am aware of the risk, I try not to give the car the opportunity to screw up. I either have a finger poised over the off button, or I reduce the ACC set speed before I get to an area where I expect a slowdown. I think Travel Assist and Lane Keep Assist do reasonably good job but they are not doing my job, which is steering. The Subaru beeped incessantly when you go close to a lane line, making my passengers uncomfortable. (The system could be turned off but the volume could not be adjusted.) The steering shake on the ID4 is immensely better. Also, the Subaru was eaily fooled by painted-over lane lines or other patches on the pavement. Yes, the ID.4 is confused by lanes that widen or split but, once you are aware of the behavior, it becomes a minor (and non0threatening) annoyance. I find myself tightening my grip on the wheel when I approach a potentially confusing road configuration. I'm not in a hurry to find out how well Front Assist works, but I have already seen that it makes the same mistake that my Subaru and Bolt made. (To be honest, it's not a "mistake," it's a "behavior.") When I am following a car and the car ahead begins to slow and signal a turn, my vehicle does not "know" about the turn. It only "knows" that, at the present closing rate, and with no brake activity, I will hit that obstacle. For my part, I may have lifted off the accelerator, but I have not touched the brake because I can see that the car will turn out of my lane before I hit it. Only once have I had a car (the Bolt, not the ID.4) actually hit the brakes in this situation, but I have frequently had my car give the audible warning and flash a red light. Again, since I know the limitations of the cars' "logic," I am not troubled by this. I think the Blind Spot Monitor ("Side Assist") works about as well as the systems in my prior cars, but the ID.4 has one significant advantage -- visibility of the alert light. On the Subie and Bolt (and on many cars), the warning light is a dime-size light built into the side view mirror face. Because the mirror itself is bright, the yellow warning light in not very noticeable in daylight. The ID.4 has a much larger amber light that is set against the dark face of the mirror housing, so it is easier to see. I like.  

Please can we bare in mind that all of these functions are assists. The driver must be in control at all times. If you see a hazard in front or the road layout changes you need to act before the vehicle gets to it. All of these assists will only get better with time.  

When lane assist is on I see the icons cars on the front side and in front What good is this? My Ioniq 5 and other Hyundai's show the cars from the blind spot until they pass. I can see the cars when they show on the screen Is there a setting?  

Manybees

The view of the car in front tells you what following distance you currently have set for ACC. To see other cars in the lanes around you, do a right-swipe on the View rocker switch on the left side of the steering wheel. The left panel on the instrument screen should then widen and push the middle panel to the right, and hide the right panel completely. The widened view will show the other lanes around you and the vehicles in them.  

The cars around me — parallel to me to the side and in front, yes. That is after I have seen them with my eyes. Usefulness? Zero. How about the cars in my blind spot and farther back? That’s where I need the help. The current strategy makes no sense.  

Good to know that is not only me that thinks the side and front icons are worthless. Oh that is worthless with a capital W  

SoCalLagunaMan said: Good to know that is not only me that thinks the side and front icons are worthless. Oh that is worthless with a capital W. Click to expand...

The value for me is being able to see what the car is “seeing”. Helps me understand the abilities and limitations of the ADAS and know when I may need to take over controls.  

The car doesn't 'see' to the side or the rear, only to the front (as you can see from the big camera behind the rearview mirror). The side and rear are all off the radar system that is in the rear bumper, so it 'detects'. Tesla has camera's all around the vehicle, and these days few or no sensors in the bumpers. They use a much different system than the VW. The VW uses 'established' tech that's been available on Audi's (it's a copy of the Audi system, right down to the windows on the rear view mirrors) for many years at this point. I believe what icon is chosen is derived from some factors including the length or width of the detection event: cars, motorcycles, and trucks in front of you all have very different cross sections detected by radar. Some with passing where the length of time the car will detect something is very different again between the 3. Take that data, program a hurestic, and change the icon. Not rocket science. In theory, 3.x SHOULD start to make travel assist better on non- or poorly-maked roads with the start of swarm data collection. Theory there being that the cloud will learn over time that people always move right at this barrier and start to blend that with the vision in the car to make better decisions. Who knows how long that will take to bear fruit in the US, but it's at least a solution to the millions of miles of unpaved roads. Anyhow, I like ACC but I agree that what it considers safe and what all the NASCAR drivers around my on the interstate consider a 'space big enough to fit into' are not the same thing. In a packed highway, it's almost dangerous to use.  

fireboy92k said: In theory, 3.x SHOULD start to make travel assist better on non- or poorly-maked roads with the start of swarm data collection. Theory there being that the cloud will learn over time that people always move right at this barrier and start to blend that with the vision in the car to make better decisions. Who knows how long that will take to bear fruit in the US, but it's at least a solution to the millions of miles of unpaved roads. Click to expand...
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Solving "ACC is unavailable" dash error "C110300 - Adaptive cruise control sensor misadjusted" on mk7.5

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  • Make sure your front bumper cover didn't get hit by checking the alignment at the fenders and its general appearance.
  • Clean the emblem with window cleaner and a microfiber towel
  • Take the emblem out with this tutorial and clean the inside surface
  • Check that the sensor is properly aligned and seated into its bracket
  • Remove the sensor using a non-prying trim tool under the tab at the top
  • Clean the front of the sensor with a neutral cleaner

pibe81

hey @physh thanks for the troubleshooting guide. Unfortunately it didn't solve my issue. I even tried the VCDS recalibration procedure, standing in front of a vertical wall, but also this fix didn't work: the alert went out, but the radar doesn't detect traffic well, so it is kinda dangerous to use it. Any other ideas?  

@pibe81 is it a Golf mk7.5? What happens when you unplug the sensor?  

Hi @physh , yes I do have a mk7.5. Unplugging and cleaning the sensor and then putting it back in didn't solve the issue. If you mean "what happens when I unplug the sensor and turn on the vehicle?", I get a bunch of alerts from the car, and I can see error logs in VCDS from more than 6 different modules. However I finally solved the issue: 1) I redid the calibration by putting the car in front of a perfectly vertical metal surface. 3) I believe the key was that I positioned the surface exactly 120cm in front of the sensor (measured with laser meter) and perpendicular to the car, both horizontally and vertically (also checked via laser meter). 4) drove a few miles: initially the detection of vehicles didn't work so promptly (could see them only when <10m ahead), but after a while it started detecting vehicles also when >50m ahead.  

pibe81 said: 1) I redid the calibration by putting the car in front of a perfectly vertical metal surface. Click to expand...

davidt512

All great tips! I had this happen just recently on my 2019 / MK7 Jetta SEL P . I get a lot of car washes due to the daily drive I have 25 miles outside of town, but since I park inside my garage, I never actually look at the front of the car. I went to pop off the emblem to look at the radar sensor, to disconnect it and clean both sides of the connection with contact cleaner, and noticed that all of the chrome on the VW lettering on the emblem, had been stripped off, likely due to hundreds of car washes over the years. Part of me thought, no, it can't be that simple. I ordered a new OEM emblem from an eBay etailer, replaced it, and problem solved! ACC now works as it should, not more "Front assist: no sensor view" error!  

Going to try this. I have a 2018 7.5R and have experienced this fault twice. First time was due to me removing the grille and it popped up on the drive right after putting everything back together. I tried to clear faults in OBD11 but no success, it kept popping straight back up. Even tried driving around to see if it fixed itself but nothing. I ended up taking it to VW and I don't think they did a re-calibration as I was charged 1hr labor. They mentioned a reset and it was gone... Few months later to now, I had the front repainted by bodyshop and after 80 miles~ now it's come back randomly with the same code and dash messages. Going to try follow this to see if I can resolve. I don't drive the car that much and think the full calibration cost is outrageous so hopefully can get rid of this. Otherwise, removing the front end anytime and having this problem each time is crazy $$$. Wish they kept the 7R ACC location to void these problems...  

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Adaptive Cruise Control - Settings?

  • Thread starter SDHXIII
  • Start date 19 Jul 2022
  • 19 Jul 2022

Advice please. When I set the ACC up it works fairly well, can't say I totally trust it, but it works. Comes up behind another vehicle and slows to match the speed. Job done. My only issue is what you might call the undercut. If I filter to the left to leave at a junction for example, if there is a slower moving vehicle to my right the van will slow down and match its speed. A bit dangerous first time because I wasn't expecting a sudden drop in speed. My question. Is there a setting that allows the radar to only take into account what is in my lane. Failing that the system isn't worth turning on. Stuart. ************* 2021 T6.1 T28 DSG. Cambridge Campervans Conversion.  

Salty Spuds

Salty Spuds

Senior member.

SDHXIII said: Advice please. When I set the ACC up it works fairly well, can't say I totally trust it, but it works. Comes up behind another vehicle and slows to match the speed. Job done. My only issue is what you might call the undercut. If I filter to the left to leave at a junction for example, if there is a slower moving vehicle to my right the van will slow down and match its speed. A bit dangerous first time because I wasn't expecting a sudden drop in speed. My question. Is there a setting that allows the radar to only take into account what is in my lane. Failing that the system isn't worth turning on. Stuart. ************* 2021 T6.1 T28 DSG. Cambridge Campervans Conversion. Click to expand...

Robert

Senior Modder

SDHXIII said: Is there a setting that allows the radar to only take into account what is in my lane. Click to expand...

Alster

Domestic appliance engineer

Mines the same-it won’t pass a car turning off down a slip road sometimes. If you just ease on the throttle it overrides it. Although I only use mine occasionally as I prefer to judge a safe distance from the other traffic depending on the conditions.  

Dannyb6467

Salty Spuds said: Do you indicate when filtering left? Not sure about filtering left, but if I put my indicator on to overtake the car in front, the ACC will accelerate in anticipation, assuming it’s clear in the overtaking lane. Click to expand...

Skyliner33

  • 20 Jul 2022
Robert said: There is no setting to adjust radar detection zone. ACC is a very cool and enjoyable feature but to really appreciate it the driver has to understand the principles of technology and limitations associated with it as well. First of all the radar recognises vehicles on the move in the same direction only. The lane that you are driving in is seen by the radar and always adjusted accordingly to steering angle sensor reading. And it doesn't necessarily need to match the physical lane painted on the road surface. Especially when you taking turn at the junction or driving through tighter corner. Click to expand...

LondonLad

Skyliner33 said: I remember thinking about this and what would happen if I go into Europe and would it automatically swap. Click to expand...
Skyliner33 said: However it won't allow an "undertake". I seem to remember seeing an option about this in the menus on the head unit. Click to expand...
Robert said: Can you safely record a video of such a scenario? And take a photo of the setting in the menu? Click to expand...

MORGS777

I use my ACC all the time but hate when traffic stops acc switches off after 5 secs of being stationary, er indoors toyota does not switch off when stationary !  

MORGS777 said: I use my ACC all the time but hate when traffic stops acc switches off after 5 secs of being stationary, er indoors toyota does not switch off when stationary ! Click to expand...
Salty Spuds said: It doesn’t switch off per-se, when you are stationary, it’ll nag you to put your foot on the brake. As soon as you do this, it cancels the ACC. When you set off again, just press the “RES” button on the steering wheel, & it’ll continue as before. Click to expand...
Skyliner33 said: What @MORGS777 was implying was why dont they set it so that when the car in front sets off the can follows it. My Golf used to do this so its just software not hardware preventing it. Click to expand...

dubber36

In a place that few understand

Samro

Samro said: Mine definitely does not need me to "resume"! It does however require me to put my foot on the brake. Lifting off brake automatically "resumes" if the radar sees it is clear in front. Failure to put the foot on the brake when prompted will result in my van punishing me by cancelling ACC and driving into whatever is in front of me! Seems daft to me! Why can't it just brake fir me? Click to expand...
Salty Spuds said: That’s odd & not the way mine works. If the traffic comes to a halt, the acc will stop the van & I get a beep & a warning to apply the brake. When I apply the brake the acc cancels. Mine is a DSG, manuals will presumably behave differently. I don’t know what yours is. Click to expand...

Shaun Witts

Shaun Witts

I love the ACC on mine (since it was “enabled”). It took a bit of getting used to and I find it can drop back a bit too far when approaching a vehicle in the same lane on the motorway. If that is the outside lane, then when that vehicle pulls in it takes so much longer to accelerate up to the set speed and overtake. However, when pulling out sharply behind an overtaking vehicle, the ACC seems to recognise that the overtaking vehicle is travelling faster and allows a much closer distance without slowing. On minor roads it is so much more relaxing to use when following one of those “variable speed” drivers. It seems to me (from the ACC display) that the system “captures” a leading vehicle and holds onto that vehicle for a while if it veers to the side. It’s probably a function of your steering angle and approaching speed for it to release that vehicle. I remember an identical scenario to that described by the OP (filtering to the left with a vehicle slowing in front of me) led to my first experience of the city braking activating (frightened the hell out of me!). This uses the same hardware as for ACC and may even use the same algorithms. Ultimately, as with all such automatic driver aids, the driver should remain in control of their vehicle and once you become familiar with any limitations of the system, it’s not great hardship to disengage the ACC if approaching a situation were you may be unsure how the system will react. Sure newer systems are better for the most part, but as @Skyliner33 reports, the ACC on his 6.1 wont let him undertake (not technically illegal), whereas mine will (I checked specifically when a car was slowing to turn right on a dual carriageway).  

Stueyphoenix

A little off topic potentially for which I apologise... Does anyone know if the brake lights are illuminated when you feel the vehicle slowing during acc use? Specifically I mean the "sharper" reductions in speed other than engine braking? During an overtake early last week the van slowed sharply as I was clearly closer than it liked during the mirror, signal manoevre phase (i was indicating right to perform the overtake) . At the same time a Tesla travelling at roughly a tonne in Lane three decided I wasnt accelerating fast enough so undertook and squeezed through the gap which I was rapidly closing. Amongst other things... It made me wonder of the van had lit up the brake lights during the lane change making the tesla driver drive in a more twatish way than normal... Sincere apologies for the sweeping generalisation regarding Tesla drivers... I cover 40k miles a year with my job and see more unsafe driving in Teslas than any other motor.  

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IMAGES

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COMMENTS

  1. Volkswagen Golf Owners Manual

    Fig. 169 Left-hand side of the multifunction steering wheel: buttons for operating the Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) . First read and observe the introductory information and safety warnings . When the Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) is switched on, the green indicator lamp in the instrument cluster lights up, and the speed memory and the status of the Adaptive Cruise Control are shown in the ...

  2. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

    Adaptive cruise control (ACC) helps drivers maintain a constant speed and distance from the vehicle ahead using sensors to detect other vehicles. . The system can reduce speed of the vehicle if there is a slower moving vehicle ahead, bring the vehicle to a standstill, and resume speed regulation as long as the vehicle in front is moving again.

  3. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

    Models. Adaptive Cruise Control ACC helps you to maintain a previously set maximum speed and a predefined distance to the vehicle ahead 03. It also features predictive cruise control and cornering assist function. ACC can adapt the vehicle speed to the applicable speed restrictions and course of the road (bends, roundabouts, etc 0304.

  4. Adaptive Cruise Control distance setting?

    Distance setting translates into time settings. So inside the computer, time is constant depending on the distance you set. Therefore, very close setting (maybe 1 sec) would mean xx distance to the car in front at 30 m/h, while with same 1 sec at 90 m/h distance increases to whatever calculation gives.

  5. How to use Adaptive Cruise Control 2021 Volkswagen Tiguan

    Adaptive Cruise Control makes road trips or any commute a lot easier. Watch this video to learn how to use Adaptive Cruise Control in your 2021 Volkswagen Ti...

  6. How To Use Volkswagen Adaptive Cruise Control

    A POV How-To Video that shows how to use Adaptive Cruise Control on a VW.How to use Adaptive Cruise Control Volkswagen AtlasHow to use Adaptive Cruise Contro...

  7. Video: How to Use Volkswagen Adaptive Cruise Control

    Thursday, 16 November, 2017. Volkswagen's Adaptive Cruise Control technology is a convenient system that eases stress on drivers by automatically adjusting speed and distance relative to vehicles ahead. If you have questions about how to use Adaptive Cruise Control on your Tiguan, Atlas, Passat or other Volkswagen models with the feature ...

  8. How to use Adaptive Cruise Control on VW Tiguan

    2021 Volkswagen Tiguan, second generation facelift - (photo by VW) To switch on adaptive cruise control, press the on/off button on your steering wheel, the system is now active but no speed is set. To save the current speed when the vehicle is moving, press the SET button. The set speed appears in the instrument cluster and the adaptive ...

  9. HOW TO: What is adaptive cruise control (ACC) in your VW?

    Have you ever wondered what the ACC function in your VW is for? Let´s learn more about using the adaptive cruise control and how it can make your driving exp...

  10. Volkswagen Cars w/ Adaptive Cruise Control (All 11 Models)

    Newer Volkswagens have the IQ Drive technology that automatically maintains a set distance from the vehicle ahead, with the ability to brake on its own to avoid a potential collision. ... 2020 VW Jetta: Adaptive cruise control: Select trims only. 2019 VW Jetta: Adaptive cruise control: Select trims only. 2018 VW Jetta: Cruise control: Standard ...

  11. VW Adaptive Cruise Control Problems (Reasons and How to Guide)

    Reasons: There can be several reasons for inaccurate speed control on VW Adaptive Cruise Control. One of the main culprits could be a malfunctioning sensor, which may not accurately measure the distance from other vehicles on the road. Additionally, outdated software or calibration issues can also lead to incorrect speed control by the ACC system.

  12. Know Your VW

    Adaptive Cruise Control Distance Level Setting. Applies to vehicles equipped with Adaptive Cruise Control. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) helps maintain an individually stored constant speed, distance, and a previously set distance in time intervals between your vehicle and those in front of you. ... To find these, go to Menu > Settings > VW Car ...

  13. Guide to Adaptive Cruise Control

    Photo Illustration: John Ritter. Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is like traditional cruise control, but smarter. ACC systems allow you to set a desired speed until your vehicle encounters slower ...

  14. PDF 2021 Arteon Quick-Start Guide

    The green cruise control indicator light will go off. 3. To resume your set speed, press the RES button on the multi-function steering wheel. Turning Cruise Control System Off • Press twice. Optional feature shown. Driver Assistance Features Adaptive Cruise Control Distance Level Setting Applies to vehicles equipped with Adaptive Cruise Control.

  15. Experiences with lane assist and adaptive cruise control

    ACC/ Adaptive Cruise Control: Pretty nice when it's on, particularly on the freeway which is it's primary design function. I love to get behind a semi at 65-70 and as close as the ACC will follow. Set the ACC to 72 or so so it'll always keep up, turn on the Travel Assist...and relax while the car does the drudgery.

  16. VW Tiguan 2021 Owner's Manual Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

    Speed range You can set. — Cruise control (GRA) a speed between approx. 30 km/h (20 mph) and 210 km/. h (130 mph). Depending on the equipment and the country, the maximum adjustable speed may be lower. — Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) 1. Press the key.

  17. Know Your VW

    Buttons for operating the Cruise Control and Adaptive Cruise Control* and Driver Assist features. Volume settings for radio, Navigation system notifications or phone calls. ... To change the ACC distance interval, ... To find these, go to Menu > Settings > VW Car-Net online services > Registration; Create a 4-Digit PIN;

  18. Know Your VW

    Adaptive Cruise Control Distance Level Setting. ... Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) helps maintain an individually stored constant speed, distance, and a previously set distance in time intervals between your vehicle and those in front of you. ... To find these, go to Menu > Settings > VW Car-Net online services > Registration; Create a 4-Digit ...

  19. Solving "ACC is unavailable" dash error "C110300

    If your mk7.5 with ACC starts showing "ACC is unavailable", followed by a C110300 OBD fault "Adaptive cruise control sensor misadjusted", do not assume you need to get a sensor alignment at the dealership like I did. Perform the following troubleshooting steps, in order, checking if the fault has been resolved between each step:

  20. Adaptive Cruise Control

    VW T6 Discussions. Electrics, Lighting, ICE, Security ... . Adaptive Cruise Control - Settings? Thread starter SDHXIII; Start date 19 Jul 2022; Tags acc 1; 2; Next. 1 of 2 Go to page. Go. Next Last. S. SDHXIII New Member. 19 Jul 2022 #1 Advice please. ... Although I only use mine occasionally as I prefer to judge a safe distance from the other ...

  21. Know Your VW

    Adaptive Cruise Control Distance Level Setting. Applies to vehicles equipped with Adaptive Cruise Control. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) helps maintain an individually stored constant speed and a previously set distance between your vehicle and those in front of you. ... To find these, go to Menu > Settings > VW Car-Net online services ...

  22. Know Your VW

    Adaptive Cruise Control is now deactivated, and your vehicle will maintain the set speed using conventional cruise control, until the next ignition cycle. Assistance System Setting If your vehicle is equipped with Driver Assist features, you can access the Assistance system settings menu in the Infotainment system, allowing modification to the ...

  23. Know Your VW

    Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) helps maintain an individually stored constant speed and a previously set distance between your vehicle and those in front of you. When you approach a slower moving vehicle in front of you, the vehicle may brake if the situation requires. ... To find these, go to Menu > Settings > VW Car-Net online services ...