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trek madone 8

Trek Does It All with the New Madone

Trek’s new eighth-generation Madone is lightweight, aerodynamic, and fast—the road bike raced by Lidl-Trek in the 2024 Tour de France.

Takeaway: For the eighth iteration of its legendary Madone road bike, Trek blended the low weight of the Emonda with the aerodynamics of the seventh-generation Madone. The result is a light, stiff, and fast all-around race bike. While the flagship SLR9 costs over $13,000, base-level Madon SL models start at $3,500.

Price as Tested: $13,500 Weight: 15.3 lbs (Size M, bottle cages, computer mount, no pedals)

Trek Madone SLR 9 AXS Gen 8

Madone SLR 9 AXS Gen 8

Jordan Roessingh, Director for Road Bikes at Trek, candidly confirmed that the new Madone actually started life as the next Émonda. “We constantly get the same feedback from our pro riders,” Roessingh said. “They tell us that they love how fast the Madone is, but could we make it lighter or they love how light the Émonda is, but could we make it more aero?”

Trek set out to make a more aerodynamic Émonda, and what they ended up with was a bike that had the same frame weight as the Émonda but was as quick as the Madone against the wind.

trek madone

When your aero bike is as light as your climbing bike, or your climbing bike is as aero as your aero bike, there doesn’t seem to be a point to having two bikes anymore. So, while fans of the Émonda might be sad to see the bike go, it makes way for the return of the Madone as the ultimate road racing bike in Trek’s lineup. And this feels right, given the rich history of the Madone name.

Since it launched in 2003, the Madone name has always designated Trek’s fastest drop-bar race bike. That has meant different things at different points, with older models of the Madone leaning heavily on low weight and high stiffness while more recent models became all-out aero. Now that Trek returns the Madone to a do-it-all role, is it the best road racing bike Trek can make?

After spending the last two months riding the new Madone 8, my short answer is yes.

The new bike delivers the performance I expect from a five-figure top-of-line road bike made by a brand like Trek. For the steep price of entry, you get a bike that manages to be damn near perfect in terms of weight, stiffness, and road manners. And while all of that is important, it would matter little to bike racers (for whom the Madone is explicitly designed) if it wasn’t also fast.

Based on Trek’s provided data and my testing, the new Madone is definitely fast. But that declaration comes with a long list of caveats.

Speed is Aerodynamics In 2024

In 2011, Specialized first told us that “Aero is everything.” Knowing what I know now about the importance of aerodynamics in the context of racing, they certainly weren’t wrong. But marketing slogans are made to be catchy and concise and “Aero is everything until you build a bike that’s really heavy and doesn’t ride all that well. So maybe a bike that prioritizes aerodynamics without sacrificing weight and ride quality would be better,” does not quite roll off the tongue as easily.

Trek claims that the new Madone is as fast as the previous generation and is heaps quicker than the Émonda. The strategy to achieve this aerodynamic performance is called “Full System Foil,” where the bike is viewed not only as a cross-section of its tube shapes but as a much larger airfoil shape that includes the water bottles and wheels.

a pair of sunglasses

This isn’t a particularly new or earth-shattering concept. Manufacturers have designed (or at least tested) their frames around specific wheels (usually their own) for a while now. Using water bottles to fill the space between the down tube and the seat tube to smooth the airflow over a frame is also not new. It has been done on time trial and triathlon bikes for years. BMC has done it on their aero-focused time machine road bike since 2018. Cannondale recently introduced aerodynamic water bottles and cages on its all-around race bike, the SuperSix Evo , in 2023.

a blue and red bicycle

The cynical reading of what Trek does with the new Madone and its aerodynamic performance claims relative to the previous (and more obviously aerodynamic Madone Gen 7) is that directly comparing the two bikes is not apples-to-apples.

trek madone 8

Trek’s claimed figures use a Madone 8 with the brand’s new aero bottles versus a Madone 7 with round bidons. In this comparison, the new Madone (at straighter yaw angles) is slightly faster than the outgoing Madone. At higher yaw angles (beyond 10º), the deeper frame tubes of the Madone 7 make it quicker than the new Madone. And when comparing the new and old Madone, with both bikes using round bottles, the results flip. According to Trek, the Madone 7 is about 1.6 watts more slippery at 22 mph.

It’s also worth dwelling for a moment on the yaw angle differences. My colleague Matt Phillips pointed this out in his review of the Specialized Tarmac SL8 , another new bike that balances optimizing aerodynamics, ride comfort, and weight. In that review, Matt points out that a rider’s speed affects the wind angles they encounter. Pro riders naturally encounter more direct (low yaw) wind angles because they (typically) ride much faster than amateur riders. Riders moving at slower average speeds will more likely encounter higher wind angles.

Trek’s aerodynamic claims for the Madone 8 are based on a rider moving at 22 mph. That is more real-world than Specialized data for the Tarmac SL8, which is based on someone moving at 28 mph.

Still, 22 mph is plenty fast for a lot of people. My rides typically average about 18 mph. At slower speeds, where the rider is more likely to encounter higher yaw angles of wind, the previous Madone will likely be faster. Strap the new Aero bottles on it, and it will almost certainly be quicker than the new Madone regardless of the wind derection.

But the gains in the Madone 8’s aerodynamics are not only down to the water bottles. Trek also introduced a new handlebar, which, when tested in isolation (without a rider on the bike), is slower than the previous handlebar. However, as part of the system with a rider on the bike, the new taller and blunter profile measures faster as it helps to smooth the airflow over the rider’s legs.

trek madone 8

If I stop being a cycling media cynic for a minute, I can see where Trek comes from in how it designed the new Madone. Sure, there is broad acceptance across cycling to the benefits of aerodynamics, yet despite this, riders still love lightweight and snappy-feeling bicycles. With the design and packaging of the new Madone, Trek can say that the new bike is faster.

However, the issue with judging aerodynamic gains is the numerous “it depends” moments. Most of these depend on how each individual bike is equipped for testing. Using aero bottles for one frame but round ones for another is obvious, but even something less apparent, like a different handlebar shape or a different-sized rider (if you’re testing with a rider), could give different results.

To put it in perspective, Trek claims the new bike is 1.6 watts faster at 22 mph. That’s not nothing. But it’s also fair to point to the basically square downtube of the new Madone and say that Trek perhaps has left some potential aerodynamic gains on the table to make a lighter and better riding bike. And to be perfectly honest, I’m not that upset about it.

New Sizing, Similar Geometry

Long-time Trek fans will remember when the brand offered two different fits on its top-of-the-line road bikes: H1 fit, designed for pro athletes, and H2 for the riding public. This gave riders a choice of stack and reach figures. The H1 and H2 fits were eventually consolidated into what Trek dubbed H1.5. But the H1.5 designation didn’t make a ton of sense (since it referred to a geometry philosophy that no longer existed), so Trek rebranded H1.5 into “Road Race” geometry.

This rebrand comes with Trek changing its numeral sizing (51, 53, 55, etc) to T-shirt sizing (XS, S, M, etc). This is another change that makes sense to me as modern bikes rarely have a tube on them that actually measures close to their designated size number.

geometry chart

The big geometry shake-up with the new Madone is that Trek reduced the bike from eight sizes on the Madone 7 to six. This was accomplished by merging the 52cm and 54cm sizes into a Medium option and the 60cm and 62cm sizes into an Extra Large. Brands often reduce model options at each end of the size spectrum (to the detriment of shorter or taller riders), so it’s unsurprising that Trek merged the 60cm and 62cm. But it surprised me to see the 52cm and 54cm sizes combined.

madone 7 v madone 8

Looking closer at the two sizes from the previous generation Madone, I was shocked at how close they were to each other. The bikes had only a 3mm difference in reach and an 8mm difference in stack. The new frame size has a few millimeters more stack than the old 54cm and 1mm more reach than the old 52cm.

I’m a rider who often chooses between these two sizes. For example, I’m happy to ride 54cm bikes from Specialized while I opt for 52cm frames from other brands like Enve or a size S from Giant. The new Medium-sized Madone I tested worked very well when paired with a 110mm stem and a zero-offset seatpost.

Still, I expect the merging of two sizes right in the middle of the size range, despite how close they are in practice, will cause some consternation for riders.

Models and Pricing

Trek offers the new Madone in nine complete bike builds and two frameset options. These are split between the more affordable Madone SL and a higher-end Madone SLR. Both bikes share the same frame shape and geometry, but the Madone SL uses a heavier 500 series OCLV carbon compared to the Madone SLR’s 900 series.

All versions of the Madone SL come equipped with a standard two-piece bar and stem. Riders who want the full aero benefits of the new bike will have to buy the aero bottles separately. A single bottle and cage set is $100, with replacement bottles at $25 each.

Four complete Madone SL bikes are offered, starting with the Madone SL 5 ($3,500), which features mechanical shifting using Shimano’s 12-speed 105.

The Madone SL 6 costs $5,500 and comes with a Shimano 105 Di2 groupset and Bontrager Aeolus Elite 35 carbon wheels. There is also a SRAM Rival AXS build of the Madone SL 6, which costs an additional $500.

At the top of the SL range is the Madone SL 7 ($6,500). This model upgrades to a Shimano Ultegra Di2 groupset, plus it uses a carbon handlebar and the deeper Bontrager Aeolus Pro 51 carbon wheels.

Next on the price pyramid is the Madone SLR 7 ($9,000). It features the same build kit as the SL 7, but for the extra $2,500, riders get the lighter-weight SLR frame, the aero bottles, nicer tires, and the one-piece RSL bar/stem. For $500 more, riders can opt for a SRAM Force AXS version of the same bike.

Finally, there are the SLR 9 flagship options. Riders can choose a Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 bike for $13,000 or one with the new SRAM Red AXS for $13,500.

Riders looking to do a frame-up build can pick between the Madone SL frameset, which costs $3,000, and the Madone SLR frameset at $6,000.

Ride Impressions

I don’t think there’s any point in dancing around it, Trek made a good bike with the latest version of the Madone—which is hardly a surprise. When you’re twenty-one years into developing a platform and are on the eighth version of it, I’m not going to say it’s impossible to make it bad, but it’s certainly difficult. This expertise, combined with wider tires that make current road racing bikes ride more comfortably than bikes from only a few years prior, I expected the new Madone to impress. And it delivered.

trek madone

The new Madone is a big step forward from the previous generation Madone 7 in its enjoyability. Stomp on the pedals and the new Madone has plenty of snap, but crucially, it is vastly superior in seated comfort compared to the 7.

trek madone

I complained about Trek shipping the previous Madone with 25mm wide tires, which honestly felt insane to me back in 2022 when I tested the bike. Thankfully, the new Madone ships with 28mm rubber that measures 29.5mm on the Bontrager Aeolus RSL 51 wheels. The wider tires certainly help with how pleasant the new bike feels on the road, but you still wouldn’t mistake the Madone for an endurance bike. This race bike provides excellent road feedback to the rider. You don’t float over the road on the new Madone, but it doesn’t beat you up while riding.

trek madone

The next big thing I felt about the new Madone was its low weight. I clearly remember testing the Madone 7 (only two years ago), that top-level build with SRAM Red and the same wheels was 16.2 pounds (without pedals, cages, or a computer mount). The new Madone 8 I rode is nearly a pound lighter at 15.3 lbs. And impressively, that weight includes the aero bottle cages and a computer mount (but not pedals).

While we know that, empirically, bike weight has a much smaller impact on performance than we think, a lighter bike still feels awesome. When a brand charges five figures for a road bike, it should be really close to, if not below, the UCI minimum bike weight of 14.99 lbs. The previous generation Madone was never in danger of falling under that weight limit, but the new Madone should comfortably hit it with a lighter set of wheels and one or two other weight weenie changes. The Madone’s low weight and stiffness make it a fun bike to ride uphill.

Thankfully, Trek did not change the Madone 8’s handling compared to the previous version. It’s still an exceptionally well-balanced bike. Racers will find steering that, while rapid, isn’t a handful. The Madone is very stable at speed while remaining exceptionally reactive to rider inputs.

trek madone

I logged quite a few miles on the new Madone and while I know that sensations are not statistics, the new Madone feels very fast. On a flat and fast weekly group ride I do, I found myself rolling off the front of the group when it was my turn to take a pull at the front. Despite the lack of deep aero tubes, the new Madone certainly has the sensation of speed that the best aero race bikes often possess. It’s best described as feeling like you’re riding with a permanent tailwind.

Conclusions on the New Madone

Combining two bikes into one is a surefire way to leave some cyclists wanting more. Some will want a more aerodynamic Madone. While others will rightly point out that Trek could have made an even lighter bike. However, the demands of modern racing often require a bike that is both aerodynamic and lightweight.

trek madone

I appreciate the raw speed of an all-out aero bike. Yet bikes like that are never at the top of my dream bike ownership list. Instead, I’ve gravitated to more all-around performers, if not straight-up weight weenie dream bikes like the Specialized Aethos .

This is probably why I don’t mind Trek going with the happy medium. Even though a true Émonda rider would have wanted Trek to make the Émonda platform lighter versus more aero, I agree with Trek that the majority of Madone 7 riders—and most road riders in general—will appreciate the new Madone’s big weight reduction without taking a massive aerodynamic hit (at least on paper).

For riders with the taste and budget for this bike, the new Madone won’t disappoint. It’s a great road bike capable of competing at the highest level while offering an alternative to other high-end, do-it-all lightweight aero bikes, like the Pinarello Dogma F, Specialized Tarmac SL8, or Factor’s Ostro Vam. For cyclists seeking a bike like this but on a more limited budget, Trek offers one of the lowest-priced entry points into a high-end race bike its $3,500 Madone SL 5.

So, while the eighth-generation Madone might not be for everyone, Trek at least offers its latest race bike in a broader range of prices than the previous version, and that’s something worth celebrating.

Notes From the Field

Random observations from my time testing the bike..

  • Considering how important the new bottles are to the aero performance of the new Madone, it’s worth discussing them. There is an adjustment time to become accustomed to getting them in and out of the aero cages. The actual hold feels extremely secure. If anything, they are a bit harder to get in and out than I want them to be, but I got used to them after a few weeks of riding. My only real gripe with them is the valve. It takes more force to open and close than I want. Plus, the flow isn’t that great. A minor annoyance is that you can’t stand the bottles on their end to fill them. Fortunately, the aero cages can hold a traditional round bottle, or you can ditch the bottle and cages altogether if the extra aero gains aren’t that important to you.
  • Given I recently wrote a story on every bike being raced in the 2024 Tour de France , including all 18 of the World Tour teams, I’m rather confident that the new Madone is the only bike currently using a UDH derailleur hanger in the World Tour. This is great for everyday riders as it means a spare hanger should never be all that hard to find and this generation of Madone should be future-proofed for whatever drivetrain SRAM might have in the future.
  • While the battle against through-the-headset cable routing has been lost, Trek at least makes the latest Madone a little easier to live with. Trek offers separate headset and spacer options to match its RSL Aero one-piece bar/stem and its RCS Pro two-piece cockpit, but there is also a headset cap that allows riders to run whatever handlebar and stem they want. Trek even offers an alternative top cap that lets riders run a round spacer on top of the RSL Aero bar. This means riders can adjust their bar height without cutting brake hoses or trimming the steerer tube.
  • The included computer mount does not allow you to adjust the angle of your computer, which is annoying. Otherwise, it’s a tidy mount and a big improvement over the one used on the Madone 7.
  • The new saddle clamp design is a big highlight. It’s secure and features independent adjustments for the angle and fore/aft adjustments, which is a big improvement over Trek’s previous single bolt design.
  • The RSL Aero one-piece cockpit won’t please everyone. Personally, I found it quite comfy in both reach and drop shape. However, the back sweep on the tops might annoy some riders who prefer a straighter top section and spend lots of time with their hands there.

Headshot of Dan Chabanov

Test Editor Dan Chabanov got his start in cycling as a New York City bike messenger but quickly found his way into road and cyclocross racing, competing in professional cyclocross races from 2009 to 2019 and winning a Master’s National Championship title in 2018. Prior to joining Bicycling in 2021, Dan worked as part of the race organization for the Red Hook Crit, as a coach with EnduranceWERX, as well as a freelance writer and photographer. 

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Mads Pedersen’s Trek Madone 9 Race Shop Limited for the Tour of Flanders — gallery

A look at the dirt-covered aero race machine that the Dane raced to second

Josh Evans/Immediate Media

trek madone pedersen

Niki Terpstra’s solo victory at the 2018 Tour of Flanders may have made the headlines, but 22-year-old Dane Mads Pedersen’s second place was as impressive and perhaps one of the biggest surprises of the 102nd edition of the race.

  • Tour of Flanders: huge tech gallery from De Ronde
  • Horse for the Course: Trek Madone for Flanders Sportive

The run into the race finish in Oudenaarde begins at the top of the Paterberg and consists of long, exposed stretches of road. Pedersen’s gap to Terpstra stuck at around 30 seconds in this finale, but with only 15 seconds on the chasing group — including Peter Sagan and Greg Van Avermaet — Pedersen being caught initially seemed inevitable.

Racing aboard the aero-specific Trek Madone, Pedersen would have been grateful of his bike choice in the final run-in, using an integrated aero cockpit, deep carbon wheels and the frameset itself for maximum aerodynamic efficiency when it was needed most.

Despite plenty of climbing along the 265-kilometre race, Pedersen opted for a slightly larger than normal 54/42 chainring combination to pair with the more standard 11-28 Shimano Dura-Ace R9100 cassette.

Shimano provides the Trek-Segafredo team with full Shimano Dura-Ace R9150 electronic groupsets and for 2018, the team switches from SRM power meters to Shimano’s R9100-P power meters.

Bontrager and Trek launched the new range of Bontrager Aeolus XXX carbon wheels ahead of the race and Pedersen ran the deepest Aeolus XXX 6 options. The wheels were paired with Vittoria Corsa Control cobble-specific tubular tyres.

Click or swipe through the gallery above for a closer look at Pedersen’s Tour of Flanders Trek Madone.

  • Bontrager Aeolus XXX 6 review

Trek Madone 9 Race Shop Limited specifications

  • Frame: Trek Madone 9 Race Shop Limited
  • Fork: Trek Madone KVF full carbon
  • Front brake: Trek Madone aero, integrated
  • Rear brake : Trek Madone aero, integrated
  • Brake/shift levers: Shimano Dura-Ace R9150
  • Front derailleur: Shimano Dura-Ace R9150
  • Rear derailleur: Shimano Dura-Ace R9150
  • Cassette: Shimano Dura-Ace R9100, 11-28
  • Chain: Shimano Dura-Ace R9100
  • Crankset: Shimano Dura-Ace R9100-P, 54/42
  • Wheelset: Bontrager Aeolus XXX 6
  • Tyres: Vittoria Corsa Control
  • Handlebars: Trek Madone OCLV Carbon bar/stem combination, 420mm wide
  • Pedals: Shimano Dura-Ace R9100
  • Bottle cages: Bontrager Bat Cage
  • Computer: Garmin Edge 520

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TREK - LIDL Trek Madone bike of Mads Pedersen 3D Model

TREK - LIDL Trek Madone roadbike of Mads Pedersen 3D model made in blender, baked from high poly and textured in substance painter. It consist of 65k faces. Bike consist of 18 objects. All of them are on the single UV layout. Baked maps are in 4k so it possible to downgrade if needed. Eight maps baked: base color, roughness, metallic, normal, ambient occlusiom, emissive, displacement, alpha.

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Tour de France

Mads pedersen abandons tour de france, leaves pothole in lidl-trek’s plans, team loses stage-hunting ace to injuries sustained in sprint crash in another blow after geoghegan hart's dns: 'we will work out a plan b to race aggressively.'.

Don't miss a moment of the 2024 Tour de France! Get recaps, insights, and exclusive takes with Velo's daily newsletter. >","name":"in-content-cta","type":"link"}}'>Sign up today! .

Mads Pedersen will not start stage 8 of the Tour de France , Lidl-Trek officials confirmed Saturday morning.

The Danish stage-hunter ace crashed hard in the midst of a chaotic sprint earlier this week and hasn’t been able to shake off his injuries.

“Unfortunately Mads Pedersen will not be on the start line of Tour de France Stage 8 after being forced to abandon the race following the crash in the bunch sprint on Stage 5 into Saint Vulbas,” read a statement from the team Saturday morning.

“The Danish rider fought through stages 6 and 7 but the pain and swelling has not improved and the range of moment in his left shoulder has worsened, making it almost impossible to handle the bike,” Lidl-Trek wrote.

Pedersen slammed hard into the barriers and clattered to the tarmac in the seconds before Mark Cavendish blitzed to his historic win on Wednesday’s fifth stage into Saint-Vulbas.

Only a sensational bunny hop by the following Alex Zingle prevented pile-up carnage in the high-speed finale.

Pedersen wobbled his way to the finish and has since been wrapped up in gauze and gutting it out at the back of the bunch.

“While the initial X-rays showed no sign of a fracture, together with the team, the decision was made that it was in Mads’ best interest to stop racing in order to undergo more detailed examinations to assess his injuries further and give him the proper rest and recovery needed to focus on his remaining goals,” read the team statement.

While @MarkCavendish makes history as greatest ever TdF rider full marks to rider who bunny jumped crashed Mads Pedersen pic.twitter.com/E2M7VC80cp — Jeremy Hague (@CloudCFO) July 3, 2024

Losing Pedersen is a kick to the guts for Lidl-Trek.

The team’s Tour was already tilted on its axis the week before the grand départ when marquee new signing and GC hope Tao Geoghegan Hart pulled out of the race with the hangovers of COVID and a recent rib fracture.

Pedersen won stages at both his past two Tours de France and reaped victories from recent raids on the Giro d’Italia and Vuelta a España.

If fit, the 28-year-old would have made hay through the Tour’s transitional style second week.

“It is a big bummer to lose Mads like this, after having lost Tao [Geoghegan Hart] before the start,” Lidl-Trek manager Luca Guercilena said Saturday.

“That said, we will still be in the game with Ciccone and we will work out a Plan B to race aggressively.”

Pedersen will now be looking for some rapid recovery before he lines out at the Paris Olympic Games, where he and Mattias Skjelmose will lead a Danish assault on the road race on August 3.

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trek madone pedersen

Who's Lidl-Trek's new star after Pedersen's exit? Betting insights for weeks two and three!

B ack in March, inspired by his strong spring performances, we penned an ode/column about him. In the Tour de France, representing Lidl-Trek, he could very well become a crucial joker in week two, especially after the withdrawal of team leader Mads Pedersen. We're talking about Toms Skujins, with whom IDLProCycling.com had an engaging conversation during La Grande Boucle!

"My form is good, that's for sure. You always want more, but you can't always control that. It's unfortunate that Mads crashed and had to leave the Tour. It's a big loss for the team," said the amiable Latvian, who earlier this year impressively finished second in Strade Bianche. "We've had a few chances for stage success, but haven't managed to clinch one. The pieces were just not falling into place. But all in all, the first week was quite good, personally for me as well. My feeling is improving and that's always good to know."

Skujins sees opportunities in second and third Tour weeks

The friendly cyclist from Sigulda also explained what his (changed) role in the three-week race entails. "Normally, I came to the Tour to support Mads and Giulio (Ciccone, ed.). But in a 21-day race, there's always at least one stage where you can try for your own success," he was ambitiously planning. "You have to be realistic about that. I will certainly try. So, we will see if I can succeed in that mission."

And Skujins is a solid attacker, that much is clear. Take the Giro d'Italia 2023. The now 33-year-old powerhouse joined the breakaway almost every day, resulting in countless honorable placements (unfortunately no victories). Could something similar happen in this Tour? "In the second and third week, there are a few nice transition stages where I might take my chance, provided I don't need to help Giulio," the rider in question explained. "However, it's hard to predict which stage will be for the breakaway and which won't. Take stage two, for example, when Kevin Vauquelin won. I don't think anyone expected the breakaway to stay away. And yet it happened. Sometimes luck can suddenly be on the side of the breakaway. If you're in it, you're in a good spot."

"Ciccone is improving as the Tour de France progresses," says Skujins

Speaking of team leader Ciccone: what does Skujins actually expect from the Italian captain of the American WorldTour team? "I think Giulio gets better as the Tour progresses," he praised the man who entered the first rest day in fourteenth place. "Like a few others, he got sick between the Critérium du Dauphiné and the Tour. That cost him a few percentage points. It might also be why he couldn't keep up on the San Luca climb during the opening weekend. But all in all, I have a lot of confidence in him. In the Dauphiné, he already showed how much climbing power he has. He was competing with the best in the race. I expect a strong final performance from him."

"If the general classification unexpectedly doesn't work out or Giulio decides not to focus on it, there's always the possibility to go for stage victories," he continued about the Southern European climber. "Or for a polka dot jersey, for example, as he has done before. However, I do expect him to go for the classification first. It would be a shame to give that up just like that. When is my Tour and that of Lidl-Trek successful? Essentially the same. When we return home with at least one stage victory. Or more, of course, haha! Two or three stages would be a tremendous success, but let's start with one." With Pedersen's withdrawal and Jasper Stuyven's near miss in the gravel stage, it might just be up to Skujins...

Who's Lidl-Trek's new star after Pedersen's exit? Betting insights for weeks two and three!

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BIKE CHECK: Mads’ winning Gent-Wevelgem Madone

trek madone pedersen

A statement win on a statement bike for Mads Pedersen at Gent-Wevelgem

One of the best Classics riders in the world needs a bike equal of calibre but, fortunately for Mads Pedersen, he has just that.

Here is the Madone SLR that was prepared to perfection by Pedersen’s mechanic Jeroen Heymans and that allowed him to extract every ounce of speed from each pedal turn in order to secure the first win of his Classics season at Gent-Wevelgem on Sunday.

trek madone pedersen

Full Specification

Frame: 7th-generation Trek  Madone  SLR, size 58

Colour: Red Smoke

Groupset: SRAM Red eTap AXS

Brakes: SRAM Red Disc, 160 front/140 rear rotors

Cranks: SRAM Red w/ Quarq Power Meter

Chainrings: SRAM Red 56/43

Cassette: SRAM Red 10-33

Chain: SRAM Red Flattop

Wheels: Bontrager Aeolus RSL 62 (back), 51 (front)

Pedals: TIME XPRO 10

Tires: Pirelli Tubeless prototype, 30mm

Cockpit: Madone one piece handlebar with TT bar tape. 130mm length (-17 degree tilt), 37-40 flared width.

Saddle: Bontrager Verse Pro

Bike computer: Wahoo ELMNT BOLT

trek madone pedersen

Project One

In this story.

trek madone pedersen

Discover more

trek madone pedersen

Mads Pedersen wins Gent-Wevelgem in a bold sprint!

trek madone pedersen

  • Mads Pedersen

trek madone pedersen

RACE GALLERY: Men’s Gent-Wevelgem

Photographer extraordinaire Zac Williams was on course to immortalize Mads Pedersen's winning performance in Gent-Wevelgem with unrestricted access to the heart of the action

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Geographic coordinates of Elektrostal, Moscow Oblast, Russia

Coordinates of elektrostal in decimal degrees, coordinates of elektrostal in degrees and decimal minutes, utm coordinates of elektrostal, geographic coordinate systems.

WGS 84 coordinate reference system is the latest revision of the World Geodetic System, which is used in mapping and navigation, including GPS satellite navigation system (the Global Positioning System).

Geographic coordinates (latitude and longitude) define a position on the Earth’s surface. Coordinates are angular units. The canonical form of latitude and longitude representation uses degrees (°), minutes (′), and seconds (″). GPS systems widely use coordinates in degrees and decimal minutes, or in decimal degrees.

Latitude varies from −90° to 90°. The latitude of the Equator is 0°; the latitude of the South Pole is −90°; the latitude of the North Pole is 90°. Positive latitude values correspond to the geographic locations north of the Equator (abbrev. N). Negative latitude values correspond to the geographic locations south of the Equator (abbrev. S).

Longitude is counted from the prime meridian ( IERS Reference Meridian for WGS 84) and varies from −180° to 180°. Positive longitude values correspond to the geographic locations east of the prime meridian (abbrev. E). Negative longitude values correspond to the geographic locations west of the prime meridian (abbrev. W).

UTM or Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system divides the Earth’s surface into 60 longitudinal zones. The coordinates of a location within each zone are defined as a planar coordinate pair related to the intersection of the equator and the zone’s central meridian, and measured in meters.

Elevation above sea level is a measure of a geographic location’s height. We are using the global digital elevation model GTOPO30 .

Elektrostal , Moscow Oblast, Russia

Mads Pedersen's Trek Madone 9 Race Shop Limited for the Tour of Flanders - Gallery

A look at the dirt-covered aero race machine that the Dane raced to second

This article originally appeared on BikeRadar

Mads Pedersen: Learning the ropes and putting out the Watts

Bontrager claims best-in-class drag, stability and weight for new Aeolus XXX wheels

Pedersen comes of age at the Tour of Flanders

Pedersen extends with Trek-Segafredo through 2020

Niki Terpstra ’s solo victory at the 2018 Tour of Flanders may have made the headlines, but 22-year-old Dane Mads Pedersen ’s second place was as impressive and perhaps one of the biggest surprises of the 102nd edition of the race.

The run into the race finish in Oudenaarde begins at the top of the Paterberg and consists of long, exposed stretches of road. Pedersen’s gap to Terpstra stuck at around 30 seconds in this finale, but with only 15 seconds on the chasing group — including Peter Sagan and Greg Van Avermaet — Pedersen being caught initially seemed inevitable.

Racing aboard the aero-specific Trek Madone, Pedersen would have been grateful of his bike choice in the final run-in, using an integrated aero cockpit, deep carbon wheels and the frameset itself for maximum aerodynamic efficiency when it was needed most.

Despite plenty of climbing along the 265-kilometre race, Pedersen opted for a slightly larger than normal 54/42 chainring combination to pair with the more standard 11-28 Shimano Dura-Ace R9100 cassette.

Shimano provides the Trek-Segafredo team with full Shimano Dura-Ace R9150 electronic groupsets and for 2018, the team switches from SRM power meters to Shimano’s R9100-P power meters.

Bontrager and Trek launched the new range of Bontrager Aeolus XXX carbon wheels ahead of the race and Pedersen ran the deepest Aeolus XXX 6 options. The wheels were paired with Vittoria Corsa Control cobble-specific tubular tyres.

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Full Specification

  • Frame: Trek Madone 9 Race Shop Limited
  • Fork: Trek Madone KVF full carbon
  • Front brake: Trek Madone aero, integrated
  • Rear brake: Trek Madone aero, integrated
  • Brake/shift levers: Shimano Dura-Ace R9150
  • Front derailleur: Shimano Dura-Ace R9150
  • Rear derailleur: Shimano Dura-Ace R9150
  • Cassette: Shimano Dura-Ace R9100, 11-28
  • Chain: Shimano Dura-Ace R9100
  • Crankset: Shimano Dura-Ace R9100-P, 54/42
  • Wheelset: Bontrager Aeolus XXX 6
  • Tyres: Vittoria Corsa Control
  • Handlebars: Trek Madone OCLV Carbon bar/stem combination, 420mm wide
  • Pedals: Shimano Dura-Ace R9100
  • Bottle cages: Bontrager Bat Cage
  • Computer: Garmin Edge 520 

trek madone pedersen

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trek madone pedersen

IMAGES

  1. BIKE CHECK: Mads Pedersen's Chroma Ultra-Iridescent P1 Madone

    trek madone pedersen

  2. Mads Pedersen's Project One World Champion Trek Madone

    trek madone pedersen

  3. Close up with the new Trek Madone: Mads Pedersen's Tour de France bike

    trek madone pedersen

  4. Mads Pedersen's Trek Madone SLR 9 Disc

    trek madone pedersen

  5. Así es la espectacular bicicleta personalizada de Mads Pedersen para el

    trek madone pedersen

  6. Pro bike check: Mads Pedersen's Trek Madone SLR 9

    trek madone pedersen

VIDEO

  1. Trek madone SLR7 Mads Pedersen sepeda Roadbike termahal di Tour De France 2023

  2. Unboxing: Gen8 Trek Madone SLR7 Era White

  3. Pro bike gallery: intro to a series

COMMENTS

  1. BIKE CHECK: Mads Pedersen's Chroma Ultra-Iridescent P1 Madone

    Cockpit: Madone one piece handlebar, 130mm length (-17 degree tilt), 37-40 flared width. Saddle: Bontrager Verse Pro. Bike computer: Wahoo ELMNT BOLT ROAM. The home of Trek Factory Racing, and all the Trek programs. Whether its road, XC, enduro, downhill, freeride, cyclocross or triathlon, you'll find a Trek athlete, racing for the win.

  2. Close up with the new Trek Madone: Mads Pedersen's Tour ...

    So we took a closer look at Trek-Segafredo rider Mads Pedersen 's new bike to get to grips with the new upgrades. The IsoFlow system not only adds compliance for a smoother ride, says Trek, but ...

  3. BIKE CHECK: Mads Pedersen's Winning Madone

    The seventh-generation Trek Madone landed on Earth recently and our sprinter Mads Pedersen has been showing it off at the Tour de France. Eagle-eyed viewers will notice there's a chunk of the frame missing - that's Trek's all-new Isoflow technology which flexes over bumps, improves aerodynamics, and shaves weight - exactly what Mads asked for in his quest for Tour success.

  4. Does Mads Pedersen have the blingest bike at the Tour De France?

    The American brand and co-sponsor of Trek- Segafredo which has become Lidl-Trek, unveiled a seriously eye-catching custom-painted iridescent Trek Madone SLR for Danish star Mads Pederson ahead of ...

  5. Madone SLR 7 Gen 7

    Madone SLR 7 Gen 7. 10 Reviews / Write a Review. $9,049.99. Model 5278471. Retailer prices may vary depending on location and delivery method. The final price will be shown in your cart. Madone SLR 7 Gen 7 is the ultimate race machine. An 800 Series OCLV Carbon frame with exclusive IsoFlow technology adds an aerodynamic advantage, cuts weight ...

  6. Mads Pedersen's unreleased new Trek, fresh from the ...

    Last year we saw two new bikes, which made for quite a busy day. This time around we've seen four - a new Canyon Aeroad, a new Pinarello Dogma F, a new Wilier all-rounder, and a new Trek Madone ...

  7. Mads Pedersen

    Mads. Pedersen. Mads just keeps adding to his legend. The 2019 World Champion won a stage of the Giro d'Italia in 2023 to complete the Grand Tour victory trifecta. He added a win at the Tour de France for good measure, giving him six all-time Grand Tour stage wins — all in the last two seasons. He also finished second in the Tour's points ...

  8. Trek's Does It All with the New Madone

    Test Editor Dan Chabanov rides and reviews Trek's new eighth-generation Madone road bike—light, aero, fast, and raced by Lidl-Trek in the 2024 Tour de France.

  9. Madone SL 7 Gen 8

    Madone Gen 8's positioning helps you ride your fastest by keeping you tucked out of the wind while still being accessible enough for a range of rider fits. Invisible cable routing The brake and shift cables of the most aerodynamic bike are routed through the frame for the ultimate in sleek, aerodynamic performance.

  10. Pro Bike Gallery: Mads Pedersen's Spring Classics Trek Madone

    Mads is aboard the latest Trek Madeon SLR, featuring a SRAM Red eTap AXS drivetrain with the same shifter design that was first released all the way back in 2015. (Photo: Will Tracy/Velo) Pedersen's bike features the Madone one-piece handlebar with TT tape. The 130 mm length stem is perfect for a cue card. (Photo: Will Tracy/Velo)

  11. New Trek Madone

    There's a new Trek Madone on show at this year's Tour de France! First spotted at the Critérium du Dauphiné, the bike is striking, with a futuristic aero sea...

  12. Pro bike check: Mads Pedersen's Trek Madone SLR 9

    Although Trek has a dedicated classics bike in the Domane and a climbing bike in the Émonda, the company has managed to supply the Madone with enough comfort and a low enough weight to make it the Dane's weapon of choice most race days. Take a closer look at Mads Pedersen's latest generation Trek-Segafredo team issue Madone SLR 9 bike.

  13. Mads Pedersen's World Champion Trek Madone Bike Build

    See Mads' Bike: http://bit.ly/32gMDjQMads Pedersen's custom, World Champion Trek Madone SLR went through the Trek Project One custom program in the 12 hours ...

  14. Trek Bikes

    Trek Bikes

  15. BIKE CHECK: Mads Pedersen's Green Madone

    Tires: Pirelli P Zero Race clincher, 28mm. Cockpit: Bontrager integrated bar-stem. 130mm length, 37-40cm flared width. Saddle: Bontrager Verse Pro. Bike computer: Wahoo ELMNT ROAM. Mads Pedersen. The home of Trek Factory Racing, and all the Trek programs. Whether its road, XC, enduro, downhill, freeride, cyclocross or triathlon, you'll find a ...

  16. Mads Pedersen's Trek Madone 9 Race Shop Limited for the Tour of

    VDOM DHTML tml>. Mads Pedersen's Trek Madone 9 Race Shop Limited for the Tour of Flanders — gallery | BikeRadar.

  17. TREK

    TREK - LIDL Trek Madone roadbike of Mads Pedersen 3D model made in blender, baked from high poly and textured in substance painter. It consist of 65k faces. Bike consist of 18 objects. All of them are on the single UV layout. Baked maps are in 4k so it possible to downgrade if needed. Eight maps baked: base color, roughness, metallic, normal, ambient occlusiom, emissive, displacement, alpha.

  18. 新型Madone Gen 8 が登場 ー スタッフインプレッション ー

    6月28日(金)に発表された「Madone Gen 8」。最軽量と最速、2つのロードバイクを組み合わせ、Madone Gen 8を生み出しました。Madoneであり、Émondaでもあるこのバイク、表彰台を目指せる1台です。今回は、トレック・ジャパンのスタッフが乗った感想(インプレッション)をお届けいたします。

  19. Mads Pedersen's Project One World Champion Trek Madone

    Less than six days. That's how long Trek had to create a bike fit for a world champion after 23-year-old Mads Pedersen's surprise victory in the World Road Championships in Yorkshire on Sunday.

  20. Tour de France 2024 tech: New superbikes, unreleased wheels and ...

    Bike brand Trek chose to be louder with the launch of their new Madone Gen 8, used by Lidl-Trek at the race, ... So don't be surprised to see Mads Pedersen sprinting with a fully-loaded frame.

  21. Mads Pedersen Abandons Tour de France, Leaves Pothole in Lidl-Trek's Plans

    Lidl-Trek loses stage-hunting Danish ace to injuries sustained in Tour de France sprint crash in latest blow after Tao Geoghegan Hart's DNS. ... making it almost impossible to handle the bike," Lidl-Trek wrote. Pedersen slammed hard into the barriers and clattered to the tarmac in the seconds before Mark Cavendish blitzed to his historic win ...

  22. Who's Lidl-Trek's new star after Pedersen's exit? Betting insights for

    In the Tour de France, representing Lidl-Trek, he could very well become a crucial joker in week two, especially after the withdrawal of team leader Mads Pedersen. We're talking about Toms Skujins ...

  23. BIKE CHECK: Mads' Madone for Tour of Flanders

    Cockpit: Madone one piece handlebar with TT bar tape. 130mm length (-17 degree tilt), 37-40 flared width. Saddle: Bontrager Verse Pro. Bike computer: Wahoo ELMNT BOLT. Mads Pedersen. The home of Trek Factory Racing, and all the Trek programs. Whether its road, XC, enduro, downhill, freeride, cyclocross or triathlon, you'll find a Trek athlete ...

  24. The flag of Elektrostal, Moscow Oblast, Russia which I bought there

    For artists, writers, gamemasters, musicians, programmers, philosophers and scientists alike! The creation of new worlds and new universes has long been a key element of speculative fiction, from the fantasy works of Tolkien and Le Guin, to the science-fiction universes of Delany and Asimov, to the tabletop realm of Gygax and Barker, and beyond.

  25. 【大阪4店舗合同】新型Madone Gen 8大試乗会を開催!

    TREK Bicycle 梅田店,本町店,なんば店,東大阪店の合同で、 7/27(土)~28(日)の2日間 新型Madone の大試乗会を開催いたします。スタッフが同伴しアテンドいたします!イベント参加後に新型Madoneご成約で限定サコッシュをプレゼント。ぜひご来店ください。

  26. Mads Pedersen's Trek Madone SLR 9 Disc

    Mads Pedersen's Trek Madone SLR 9 Disc full bike specifications. Related Products. Trek Madone SLR 9. $12,749.99. View. See all prices. Shimano Dura-Ace PD-R9100 pedals. $206. View.

  27. UUDO

    Heliport information about UUDO - Orlovo, MOS, RU. Information on this site may not be accurate or current and is not valid for flight planning or navigation.

  28. BIKE CHECK: Mads' winning Gent-Wevelgem Madone

    Cockpit: Madone one piece handlebar with TT bar tape. 130mm length (-17 degree tilt), 37-40 flared width. Saddle: Bontrager Verse Pro. Bike computer: Wahoo ELMNT BOLT. Mads Pedersen. The home of Trek Factory Racing, and all the Trek programs. Whether its road, XC, enduro, downhill, freeride, cyclocross or triathlon, you'll find a Trek athlete ...

  29. Geographic coordinates of Elektrostal, Moscow Oblast, Russia

    Geographic coordinates of Elektrostal, Moscow Oblast, Russia in WGS 84 coordinate system which is a standard in cartography, geodesy, and navigation, including Global Positioning System (GPS). Latitude of Elektrostal, longitude of Elektrostal, elevation above sea level of Elektrostal.

  30. Mads Pedersen's Trek Madone 9 Race Shop Limited for the Tour of

    Full Specification. Frame: Trek Madone 9 Race Shop Limited. Fork: Trek Madone KVF full carbon. Front brake: Trek Madone aero, integrated. Rear brake: Trek Madone aero, integrated. Brake/shift ...