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COVID-19 international travel advisories

If you plan to visit the U.S., you do not need to be tested or vaccinated for COVID-19. U.S. citizens going abroad, check with the Department of State for travel advisories.

COVID-19 testing and vaccine rules for entering the U.S.

  • As of May 12, 2023, noncitizen nonimmigrant visitors to the U.S.  arriving by air  or  arriving by land or sea  no longer need to show proof of being fully vaccinated against COVID-19. 
  • As of June 12, 2022,  people entering the U.S. no longer need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test . 

U.S. citizens traveling to a country outside the U.S.

Find country-specific COVID-19 travel rules from the Department of State.

See the  CDC's COVID-19 guidance for safer international travel.

LAST UPDATED: December 6, 2023

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The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.

Coronavirus Updates

Cdc says travel is safe for fully vaccinated people, but opposes nonessential trips.

Rachel Treisman

cdc travel vaccine covid

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its domestic travel guidance for fully vaccinated people on Friday, lifting certain requirements while continuing to advise mitigation measures like mask-wearing and hand-washing. Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its domestic travel guidance for fully vaccinated people on Friday, lifting certain requirements while continuing to advise mitigation measures like mask-wearing and hand-washing.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has updated its domestic travel guidance for fully vaccinated people, lifting certain testing and self-quarantine requirements and recommending precautions like wearing a mask and avoiding crowds. But health officials continue to discourage nonessential travel, citing a sustained rise in cases and hospitalizations.

The CDC updated its website on Friday to reflect the latest scientific evidence, writing that "people who are fully vaccinated with an FDA-authorized vaccine can travel safely within the United States."

The announcement comes less than a month after the CDC first released updated guidance about gatherings for fully vaccinated people, which it described as a "first step" toward returning to everyday activities.

Air Travel Is Opening Up Again, But That Doesn't Mean The Pandemic Is Over

The CDC considers someone fully vaccinated two weeks after they receive the last dose of vaccine. Those individuals will no longer need to get tested before or after travel unless their destination requires it, and do not need to self-quarantine upon return.

The new guidance means, for example, that fully vaccinated grandparents can fly to visit their healthy grandkids without getting a COVID-19 test or self-quarantining as long as they follow other recommended measures while traveling, according to CDC Director Rochelle Walensky.

Those measures include wearing a mask over their nose and mouth, staying 6 feet from others and washing their hands frequently. Masks are required on all planes traveling into, within or out of the U.S., under an executive order issued by President Biden.

But Walensky, speaking at a White House COVID-19 Response Team briefing on Friday, nonetheless discouraged all nonessential travel, citing a continued increase in the seven-day average of cases and hospitalizations.

"While we believe that fully vaccinated people can travel at low risk to themselves, CDC is not recommending travel at this time due to the rising number of cases," Walensky said.

CDC Director Fears 'Impending Doom' If U.S. Opens Too Quickly

CDC Director Fears 'Impending Doom' If U.S. Opens Too Quickly

She said that while vaccinated people can do more things safely, most Americans are not yet fully vaccinated. Those who are not must have a negative test 1-3 days before they travel under CDC guidance. They must either get tested 3-5 days after they return and self-quarantine for 7 days, or self-quarantine for 10 days with no test.

Walensky said on Monday that there is more travel occurring now than throughout the pandemic, including the winter holidays. She acknowledged that people have been looking to get away over spring break or take advantage of what they perceive as a "relative paucity in cases," and she said the country was seeing an uptick in cases as a result.

"The thing that's different this time is that we actually have it in our power to be done with the scale of the vaccination," she said. "And that will be so much slower if we have another surge to deal with as well."

The U.S. is already seeing an uptick in domestic travel, and many Americans are looking to book trips in the coming months in what experts described to NPR as a sign of "clear pent up demand for travel."

As the country's supply of COVID-19 doses has grown, so has Biden's goal for the number of shots in arms during his first 100 days, doubling the target to 200 million by the end of this month. Many states have already expanded eligibility to all adults or are set to do so in the coming weeks, well ahead of the president's May 1 deadline.

According to NPR's vaccine tracker , 16.9% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, and 30% has had at least one dose. Researchers estimate that 70% to 85% of the country would need to have immunity for COVID-19 to stop spreading through communities.

International travel restrictions remain

The CDC is not lifting travel restrictions barring the entry of most non-U.S. citizens from places including China, Brazil, South Africa and parts of Europe. It will continue to require airline passengers entering the U.S. to get a test within three days of their departure and show proof of a negative result before boarding.

The travel industry has been pushing for some of these restrictions to end. A group of 26 organizations sent a letter to White House COVID-19 czar Jeffrey Zients urging the federal government "to partner with us to develop, by May 1, 2021, a risk-based, data-driven roadmap to rescind inbound international travel restrictions."

While Some Spring Breakers Swarm Beaches, Many Stay Home, Dreaming Of Summer Travel

While Some Spring Breakers Swarm Beaches, Many Stay Home, Dreaming Of Summer Travel

"To be clear, at this time, we do not support removal or easing of core public health protections, such as the universal mask mandate, inbound international testing requirement, physical distancing or other measures that have made travel safer and reduced transmission of the virus," they wrote. "However, the data and science demonstrate that the right public health measures are now in place to effectively mitigate risk and allow for the safe removal of entry restrictions."

Travel and tourism have taken a considerable hit because of the pandemic with industry groups noting that overseas travel to the U.S. declined by 81% in 2020, causing billions of dollars in losses. Without lifting international travel bans, the U.S. Travel Association estimates that some 1.1 million American jobs will not be restored and billions in spending will be lost by the end of the year.

"Fortunately, enough progress has been made on the health front that a rebound for domestic leisure travel looks possible this year, but that alone won't get the job done," Roger Dow, the association's president and CEO, said in a statement . "A full travel recovery will depend on reopening international markets, and we must also contend with the challenge of reviving business travel."

Fauci Expects Surge In Vaccinations To Keep A 4th Coronavirus Wave At Bay

Fauci Expects Surge In Vaccinations To Keep A 4th Coronavirus Wave At Bay

  • COVID-19 vaccine
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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The Administration will end the COVID-19 vaccine requirements for international air travelers at the end of the day on May 11, the same day that the COVID-19 public health emergency ends. This means starting May 12, noncitizen nonimmigrant air passengers will no longer need to show proof of being fully vaccinated with an accepted COVID-19 vaccine to board a flight to the United States. CDC’s Amended Order Implementing Presidential Proclamation on Safe Resumption of Global Travel During the COVID-19 Pandemic will no longer be in effect when the Presidential Proclamation Advancing the Safe Resumption of Global Travel During the COVID-19 Pandemic is revoked .

Please see: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2023/05/01/the-biden-administration-will-end-covid-19-vaccination-requirements-for-federal-employees-contractors-international-travelers-head-start-educators-and-cms-certified-facilities/

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Watch CBS News

Fully vaccinated people may safely resume travel, CDC says

By Alexander Tin

Updated on: April 2, 2021 / 6:57 PM EDT / CBS News

Americans who have been fully vaccinated may safely begin traveling again, according to new guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The guidance says "fully vaccinated travelers are less likely to get and spread COVID-19 ."

"People who are fully vaccinated with an FDA-authorized vaccine can travel safely within the United States," the CDC site says. It goes on to say that travelers who are fully vaccinated don't need to be tested before or after they travel unless required to do so by their destination. They also do not need to self-quarantine.

"For example, fully vaccinated grandparents can fly to visit their healthy grandkids without getting a COVID-19 test, or self quarantining, provided they follow the other recommended prevention measures," CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said at a White House briefing on Friday.

The new guidance urges Americans to delay international travel until they are fully vaccinated, and Walensky said fully vaccinated people who are traveling internationally should still be tested three to five days after they arrive in the U.S. on an international flight. 

She noted that the CDC continues to advise that "all travelers, regardless of vaccination status, should continue to wear masks on planes buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation, while traveling." The CDC also urges travelers to maintain social distancing and wash hands "often" or use hand sanitizer.

The updates mark the first major revisions to the CDC's guidance for  what fully vaccinated Americans can do since they were first announced last month, a sign of hope for the coming return to more normal life heralded by widespread immunity.

For now, though, Walensky maintained that "CDC is not recommending travel at this time due to the rising number of cases " in the U.S. 

"I want to acknowledge today that providing guidance in the midst of a changing pandemic, and its changing science, is complex. On the one hand, we are telling you we are worried about rising cases, to wear a mask, and to avoid travel. Yet on the other hand, we are saying that, if you are vaccinated, evolving data suggests that traveling is likely lower risk," she said.

After a months-long decline in cases around the country following the winter holidays, the spread of COVID-19 has picked up once again around the country.   Four in 10 counties  in the U.S. are now in the agency's "red zone" indicating high community transmission.

The CDC has also warned of highly-transmissible variants which often spread through travel. The B.1.1.7 strain, first identified in the United Kingdom, now is "predominant" across a broad swath of the U.S.  from New York to Texas , a CDC spokesperson said Friday.

"In terms of travel, here's what we know: Every time that there's a surge in travel, we have a surge in cases in this country," Walensky had said last month when asked why the agency had yet not loosened its recommendations for fully vaccinated travelers. "We know that many of our variants have emerged from international places, and we know that the travel corridor is a place where people are mixing a lot."

A week ago, Walensky said she had a feeling of "impending doom," warning that the number of infections, hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 were all rising.

Asked whether she still had that feeling, Walensky replied, "I still continue to worry that with 80% of the population unvaccinated that we have a lot of work to do to control this pandemic."

At Friday's press briefing, federal health officials pointed to promising real-world evidence suggesting the three COVID-19 vaccines currently allowed for use in the United States — from Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson — appear to remain highly effective, despite the worrisome new strains.

"So the bottom-line message is that vaccines work very well in the real-world setting. They work against variants, although we need further data to confirm that they are durable for at least six months, and they work in adolescents," Dr. Anthony Fauci, President Biden's chief medical adviser, told reporters.

"Very, very good reason for everyone to get vaccinated as soon as it becomes available to you," Fauci added.

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • COVID-19 Vaccine

Alexander Tin is a digital reporter for CBS News based in the Washington, D.C. bureau. He covers the Biden administration's public health agencies, including the federal response to infectious disease outbreaks like COVID-19.

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The Hill

Updated COVID-19 vaccines 54 percent effective against symptomatic cases: CDC

T he updated COVID-19 vaccines administered this fall and winter were found to be 54 percent effective at preventing symptomatic infections among adults, according to an early analysis released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with researchers finding that the shot was protective against the dominant JN.1 subvariant.

Through the CDC’s Increasing Community Access to Testing program that provides free testing to uninsured individuals, researchers gathered data on patients who experienced COVID-19-like symptoms.

The data was sourced from tests conducted at participating CVS Pharmacy and Walgreens locations from September 2023 to January 2024.

Using patients who tested negative for COVID-19 as a control group, researchers compared the rate of self-reported symptoms occurring as well as history of infection and immunization between the control and those who tested positive.

Among the 9,222 tests that were deemed eligible for analysis, vaccine effectiveness was found to be 54 percent among adults over the age of 18.

“Updated monovalent COVID-19 vaccines provided 54% (95% CI = 46–60%) protection against symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection in persons recently vaccinated compared with those who did not receive an updated vaccine dose,” according to the analysis. “Vaccination provided protection for infections caused by JN.1 and infections caused by XBB-related lineages.”

Though the updated vaccines from Pfizer, Moderna and Novavax were designed to protect against the XBB.1.5 omicron subvariant, health officials anticipated and hoped that dominant strains that arose by the time doses were administered would be closely related enough for the shots to still be effective.

According to the most recent federal surveillance data, the JN.1 omicron subvariant currently accounts for about 86 percent of COVID-19 infections in the U.S.

The report acknowledged some limitations within this analysis. As patient history of immunization, underlying medical conditions and infection was self-reported, these results could be subject to recall bias. It was also noted that these results were derived from a population of people who chose to get tested for SARS-CoV-2, meaning there could be additional biases affecting the data.

For the latest news, weather, sports, and streaming video, head to The Hill.

Updated COVID-19 vaccines 54 percent effective against symptomatic cases: CDC

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Guest Essay

My Patients Used to Be Enthusiastic About the Covid Vaccine. What Changed?

Several people hiding behind a medical exam table at a doctor’s office.

By Danielle Ofri

Dr. Ofri is a primary care doctor in New York.

The response has been almost like clockwork, at nearly every medical visit in the past few weeks. “It’s time for the flu shot,” I’ll say to my patients, “plus the updated Covid vaccine.” And that’s when the groans start.

In the past, the flu shot elicited the most resistance. The patients at my New York City practice would take their other vaccinations without a second thought but balk at the flu shot — because their sister is allergic to eggs or because they’re sure that the flu shot always gives them the flu or because they just don’t do flu shots. Now, though, a majority of my patients respond along the lines of, “Fine to do the flu shot” — sheepishly pause, then say — “but not the Covid.”

When I ask my patients if they have any concerns or questions about the Covid vaccine, hardly any do. Practically no one asks me about safety data or how effective it is at preventing viral transmission, hospitalization and death. Almost no one asks me about current case counts or masking or Paxlovid. There’s just a vague hedge or an abashed, “I don’t know, I just don’t.” As I try to suss out what’s on my patients’ minds, I can feel their slight sense of surprise that there is no specific issue causing their discomfort about getting the updated Covid vaccine. It’s as though they have a communal case of the heebie-jeebies.

Health professionals everywhere are hearing this kind of hesitance among patients as Covid cases and hospitalizations have continued to rise during the winter. As of early January , the average number of Americans dying weekly from Covid was over 1,700. And yet the Jan. 19 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report indicated that only 21.8 percent of adults 18 and older have received the latest Covid vaccine — less than half of the percentage of those who have gotten the flu vaccine.

Improving this situation isn’t easy, and it will require health care providers wading into awkward conversations that are less about facts and more about emotions. But if we don’t, we will be tolerating a level of preventable death that we’d find unacceptable in any other realm of health care.

It is possible to acknowledge pandemic fatigue without throwing in the towel. Our community’s long-term health and lives depend on it.

When my patients express their hesitance to get the updated vaccine, I’ll explain how the Covid virus has mutated, so that’s why we’ve altered the vaccine, just as we do for the flu shot every year. I’ll point out that in the first two years of Covid vaccination, an estimated three million lives in the United States have been saved and an estimated 18 million hospitalizations prevented. These facts rarely have much effect. There are, of course, practical barriers to the vaccine — cost, access, feeling crummy the next day — but that’s not what most of my patients are bringing up.

Their hesitation is all the more distressing, because, as New Yorkers, they had front-row seats to the vicious first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic, losing family members and friends. The line of refrigerated morgue trucks parked behind my hospital is a sight not easily forgotten. Moreover, these patients are not anti-vaxxers; they take their shingles vaccines and tetanus shots with hardly a shrug. Nearly all received the initial Covid vaccine series and fully remember the urgency of getting those hard-to-find vaccination slots in the early days. Nor do they seem to be science deniers; they embrace standard medical treatments for most of their other health conditions.

Each time I’m faced with a patient hedging on the Covid shot, I have to decide whether to put aside the many other pressing medical issues competing for our limited time to go down the vaccine-hesitancy road. These discussions are notoriously messy and lengthy and rarely change minds. Part of me just wants to move on, as my patients — and indeed the entire country — seem to want to do. Pandemic fatigue has even emerged as its own field of study .

But something in me doesn’t feel ready to let it go. The specificity of their Covid refusal — especially compared with flu refusal — piques my curiosity and consternation. So many of my patients have medical problems that put them at high risk for complications of Covid, such as hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, obesity, kidney disease, asthma. Yet here they are, one after another, rejecting a medical intervention that most have safely received before and substantially improves outcomes . And they can’t really articulate a specific reason, even to themselves. Shrugging this off seems wrong.

So I clear the deck, push myself away from the computer, make full eye contact and begin again. I might start with, “Tell me what’s on your mind” or “What makes you feel differently about the Covid vaccine versus the flu shot?” I try to step into the gray zone of their responses and explore those awkward feelings.

When they say, “I’ve had enough Covid vaccinations already,” I’ll probe where the sense of “enough” comes from. I might ask, “Do you ever feel this way about your diabetes medicines or your mammograms?” We’ll explore how they come to conclusions about which treatments they accept and try to separate vague discomfort from specific concerns.

A review of the facts is less about starting a lecture and more about examining emotional responses. We talk openly about what they are hearing in their communities — that the pandemic is over, that the new boosters are more experimental than the old ones, that some number of vaccinations is too many.

It can be a revelation to some patients when they realize that they may be reacting to a sense of the waters being muddied rather than specific information or misinformation.

I do want my patients to maintain a healthy skepticism about any proposed intervention to the body, whether it comes from their doctor or from social media. I’ll happily pull up information from medical reference sites like UpToDate to review the pros and cons of a treatment with them. I’ll always respect their choice to disagree with my recommendations, but I do want to understand why.

We in medicine are fairly good at responding to specific concerns; we easily marshal facts and numbers because this is the arena in which we are most comfortable. It’s tempting to shy away from the queasier realm of free-floating discomfort, but we can’t. The good news is that this can be a constructive and collaborative moment in the relationship between patients and medical professionals. In my experience, when we talk directly about the awkward gray zone that seems to suffuse vaccine hesitancy, there’s a certain shared humbling. We are all profoundly disconcerted by states of ambiguity.

In deconstructing these uncertainties, I get a sense of many patients feeling a stronger sense of control. They don’t immediately yank up their sleeves for the jab, but there’s a clear shift in attitude. They are much more willing to engage in a conversation about the realities of the Covid vaccine and how it compares with the flu vaccine or getting the Covid infection.

To me, that’s progress. Some do go on to get vaccinated; many don’t. But at least we are able to consider the Covid vaccination the way we’d consider any other medical intervention.

As time-consuming and exhausting as these conversations can be, we have a communal duty to try to unmuddy the waters — all of us. If you’ve been hesitating about getting your updated Covid vaccination, you might want to put your heebie-jeebies front and center on the exam table at your next medical visit. They’re due for a checkup.

Danielle Ofri , a primary care doctor at Bellevue Hospital, is the author of “When We Do Harm: A Doctor Confronts Medical Error.”

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It's a 'tripledemic.' What to do if you have COVID, the flu or RSV

cdc travel vaccine covid

The winter season drove a new wave of coronavirus infections across the country in early January, including in Arizona, where state data indicated a rise in other respiratory illnesses like the flu and RSV.

The “tripledemic” is how physicians and medical providers nicknamed all three viruses' seasonal surge. Numbers published by the Arizona Department of Health Services show a slowing in Influenza and RSV activity, though they remain higher than the average for the last five seasons for the week ending Jan. 27.  

AZDHS data also indicates that COVID-19 activity has stabilized, remaining below the average of the last three seasons. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's latest county snapshot categorizes overall respiratory illness activity in Arizona as "moderate."

Although getting infected with a respiratory illness is not life-threatening for most, the elderly, people who are pregnant, and those who have compromised immune systems can be severe. Hospitalization, Long COVID and death remain risks for those who catch COVID-19. 

The latest wave of respiratory illness activity has contributed to extremely busy emergency departments across hospitals in the state. In an interview with The Arizona Republic , Dr. Moneesh Bhow, an emergency physician at Banner University Medical Center Phoenix, described the situation. 

"January is classically our busiest month but we were looking at our volumes compared to a few years ago and we are up five to 10% compared to previous years. It has been a really busy January," Bhow said. "We're busier than we were in January 2022 and 2023."

Though case numbers have trended downwards, the winter season can still drive more infections of respiratory illnesses.

Here are a couple of things to know to avoid getting infected during the “tripledemic”:

What should I do if I have COVID?

The CDC published recommendations for what to do if you have COVID-19 in May 2023. 

A blog post on their website lists four points: Protect yourself and others if you have COVID-19, stay at home for at least 5 days, wear a mask around other people for 10 days and get medicine if you think you might get very sick. 

The CDC clarifies that you should call your doctor as soon as you know you are sick with COVID-19. 

Where can I get vaccinated for COVID-19?

To find a COVID-19 vaccine in your area, search for the nearest vaccination locations using the online tool Vaccines.gov , then call or visit the provider's website to make an appointment. 

More: 5 things Arizonans should know about new COVID vaccines (and they're not called boosters)

What is RSV?

RSV, or Respiratory Syncytial Virus, is identified as a common respiratory virus by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. RSV is an illness that most people can recover from in a week or two. However, depending on underlying conditions and other factors in an individual's health, RSV can be serious. 

What are the symptoms of RSV?

Symptoms for RSV show up within four to six days of getting infected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have identified these symptoms tied to RSV: Runny nose, decrease in appetite, coughing, sneezing, fever and wheezing. 

The CDC adds that the symptoms do not appear all at once but in stages. 

More severe infections can cause bronchiolitis, an inflammation of the small airways in the lung, pneumonia, and an infection of the lungs. 

Is there a shot to protect against RSV?

In May 2023, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Arexvy , the first RSV vaccine for use in the United States. The vaccine manufactured by GSK plc, a British pharmaceutical company, is intended for individuals 60 and older to help prevent lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) caused by RSV. 

Since then, the FDA has approved a second vaccine , the first intended for pregnant individuals to prevent RSV in infants. Pfizer’s Abrysvo is indicated for individuals at 32 through 36 weeks of gestational age to prevent LRTD in infants from birth to 6 months of age. 

What is the flu and how does it spread?

Influenza is a contagious respiratory illness that most individuals know as the flu. Aside from the typical runny nose and sore throat, infected individuals can display symptoms like fevers, body aches, fatigue and headaches. 

The flu virus spreads through droplets, as described by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Most experts believe that flu viruses spread mainly by tiny droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze, or talk,” as a blog post details on the CDC website.

How long is the flu contagious?

According to the CDC, if you are sick with the flu, it is good to know that individuals are most contagious in the first 3-4 days after the illness begins. The infection can be passed along to otherwise healthy adults even a day before symptoms develop and up to seven days after getting sick. 

Where can I get vaccinated for the flu?

To find a flu vaccine in your area, you can search for the nearest vaccination locations using the online tool Vaccines.gov , then call or visit the provider's website to make an appointment. 

Have a question you need answered? Reach the reporter at  [email protected] . Follow him on X, formerly Twitter  @raphaeldelag .

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Mexico Traveler View

Travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine-preventable diseases, stay healthy and safe.

  • Packing List

After Your Trip

Map - Mexico

Be aware of current health issues in Mexico. Learn how to protect yourself.

Level 1 Practice Usual Precautions

  • Dengue in the Americas January 22, 2024 Dengue is a risk in many parts of Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Some countries are reporting increased numbers of cases of the disease. Travelers to the Americas can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites. Destination List: Colombia, Costa Rica, French Guiana (France), Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique (France), Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Saint Barthelemy, Saint Martin, Turks and Caicos Islands (U.K.)
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Mexico December 11, 2023 There have been reports of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) in people traveling to the United States from Tecate, in the state of Baja California, Mexico.
  • Salmonella Newport in Mexico September 08, 2022 Some travelers who have spent time in Mexico have been infected with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Newport.

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Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

Hepatitis A

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers one year old or older going to Mexico.

Infants 6 to 11 months old should also be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. The dose does not count toward the routine 2-dose series.

Travelers allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin, which provides effective protection for up to 2 months depending on dosage given.

Unvaccinated travelers who are over 40 years old, immunocompromised, or have chronic medical conditions planning to depart to a risk area in less than 2 weeks should get the initial dose of vaccine and at the same appointment receive immune globulin.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers younger than 60 years old traveling to Mexico. Unvaccinated travelers 60 years and older may get vaccinated before traveling to Mexico.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

CDC recommends that travelers going to certain areas of Mexico take prescription medicine to prevent malaria. Depending on the medicine you take, you will need to start taking this medicine multiple days before your trip, as well as during and after your trip. Talk to your doctor about which malaria medication you should take.

Find  country-specific information  about malaria.

Malaria - CDC Yellow Book

Considerations when choosing a drug for malaria prophylaxis (CDC Yellow Book)

Malaria information for Mexico.

Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series.

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

Rabid dogs are commonly found in Mexico. However, if you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other mammal while in Mexico, rabies treatment is often available. 

Consider rabies vaccination before your trip if your activities mean you will be around dogs or wildlife.

Travelers more likely to encounter rabid animals include

  • Campers, adventure travelers, or cave explorers (spelunkers)
  • Veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers handling animal specimens
  • Visitors to rural areas

Since children are more likely to be bitten or scratched by a dog or other animals, consider rabies vaccination for children traveling to Mexico. 

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Recommended for most travelers, especially those staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities or rural areas.

Typhoid - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Typhoid

Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Avoid bug bites, chagas disease (american trypanosomiasis).

  • Accidentally rub feces (poop) of the triatomine bug into the bug bite, other breaks in the skin, your eyes, or mouth
  • From pregnant woman to her baby, contaminated blood products (transfusions), or contaminated food or drink.
  • Avoid Bug Bites

Chagas disease

  • Mosquito bite

Leishmaniasis

  • Sand fly bite
  • An infected pregnant woman can spread it to her unborn baby

Airborne & droplet

Avian/bird flu.

  • Being around, touching, or working with infected poultry, such as visiting poultry farms or live-animal markets
  • Avoid domestic and wild poultry
  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Mexico, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the Department of State Country Information Pages for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Mexico. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Some diseases in Mexico—such as dengue, Zika, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease—are spread by bugs and cannot be prevented with a vaccine. Follow the insect avoidance measures described above to prevent these and other illnesses.

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Mexico include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip.

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Do not swim in freshwater in developing areas or where sanitation is poor.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • To prevent infections, wear shoes on beaches where there may be animal waste.

Leptospirosis, a bacterial infection that can be spread in fresh water, is found in Mexico. Avoid swimming in fresh, unchlorinated water, such as lakes, ponds, or rivers.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately. Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Consider buying medical evacuation insurance. Rabies is a deadly disease that must be treated quickly, and treatment may not be available in some countries.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medications you take.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Mexico’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

In some countries, medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) may be substandard or counterfeit. Bring the medicines you will need from the United States to avoid having to buy them at your destination.

Malaria is a risk in some parts of Mexico. If you are going to a risk area, fill your malaria prescription before you leave, and take enough with you for the entire length of your trip. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking the pills; some need to be started before you leave.

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

In many places cars, buses, large trucks, rickshaws, bikes, people on foot, and even animals share the same lanes of traffic, increasing the risk for crashes.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Ride only in cars that have seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Avoid driving at night; street lighting in certain parts of Mexico may be poor.
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Mexico, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Medical Evacuation Insurance

If you are seriously injured, emergency care may not be available or may not meet US standards. Trauma care centers are uncommon outside urban areas. Having medical evacuation insurance can be helpful for these reasons.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

For information traffic safety and road conditions in Mexico, see Travel and Transportation on US Department of State's country-specific information for Mexico .

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

To call for emergency services while in Mexico, dial 066, 060, or 080. Write these numbers down to carry with you during your trip.

Learn as much as you can about Mexico before you travel there. A good place to start is the country-specific information on Mexico from the US Department of State.

Americans in Mexico have been arrested for purchasing souvenirs that were, or looked like, antiques and that local customs authorities believed were national treasures. Familiarize yourself with any local regulations for antiques and follow these tips:

  • When you are considering purchasing an authentic antique or a reproduction, ask if you are allowed to export these items before you purchase them.
  • If you buy a reproduction, document on the customs form that it is a reproduction.
  • If you buy an authentic antique, obtain the necessary export permit (often from the national museum).

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Mexico for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

If your doctor prescribed antimalarial medicine for your trip, keep taking the rest of your pills after you return home. If you stop taking your medicine too soon, you could still get sick.

Malaria is always a serious disease and may be a deadly illness. If you become ill with a fever either while traveling in a malaria-risk area or after you return home (for up to 1 year), you should seek immediate medical attention and should tell the doctor about your travel history.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

Map Disclaimer - The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on maps do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Approximate border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement are generally marked.

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2023-2024 Flu Vaccine Coverage Update (Continued)

February 2, 2024 —This update compares flu vaccination coverage across several indicators to the same time last season as well as prior to the COVID-19 pandemic when available.

Doses Given in Pharmacies and Medical Offices

According to insurance claims data for adults 18 years and older, as of January 13, 2024, the number of flu vaccination doses given so far this season in pharmacies and medical offices is lower compared with last season by about 7 million doses (from 66 million to 59 million doses, or about a 10% percent decline). There were drops in the number of doses given in both pharmacies and medical offices this season compared with last season.

  • Vaccinations at pharmacies declined by about 4 million doses compared to last season (from 40 million to 36 million doses, or about a 10 percent decline)
  • Vaccinations in provider offices declined by about 3 million doses (from 26 million to 23 million doses, or about a 12 percent decline).

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an overall increase in the numbers of doses of flu vaccine given in pharmacies, while there has been an overall decrease in the number of flu vaccine doses given in provider offices.

  • Flu vaccinations given in pharmacies increased by 2.5 million doses from 2019-2020 to 2023-2024 (from 34.1 million to 36.6 million doses, or about a 7 percent increase).
  • Flu vaccinations given in medical offices decreased by 11 million doses since 2019-2020 (from 34.7 million to 23.7 million doses, or about a 32 percent decline).

More information is available from FluVaxView’s Weekly Flu Vaccination Dashboard (Figure 7, when sorted by place of vaccination).

Rural Versus Urban/Suburban Vaccination Coverage

Disparities in vaccine uptake are sustained or worsening among people living in rural areas compared with those living in suburban or urban areas.

For children , as of January 20, 2024, flu vaccine coverage among children residing in rural areas was about 17 percentage points lower compared with children living in urban areas (36% compared with 52%) and about 12 percentage points lower compared with children living in suburban areas (36% compared with 48%).

Compared with the same time last season, coverage among children living in rural, suburban or urban areas has changed as follows:

  • coverage among children residing in rural areas is 4 percentage points lower so far this season compared with last season (36% compared with 40%).
  • coverage among children residing in suburban areas is 4 percentage points lower so far this season compared with last season (48% compared with 52%).
  • coverage among children residing in urban areas is similar so far this season compared with last season (53% compared with 54%).

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, coverage by urbanicity among children has declined as follows:

  • coverage among children residing in rural areas is 16 percentage points lower so far this season compared with 2019 (36% compared with 52%).
  • coverage among children residing in suburban areas is 10 percentage points lower so far this season compared with 2019 (48% compared with 58%)
  • coverage among children residing in urban areas is 6 percentage points lower so far this season compared with 2019 (53% compared with 59%).

More information is available from FluVaxView’s Weekly Flu Vaccination Dashboard (Figure 2D, when sorted by urbanicity under the demographics tab).

For adults , those living in rural areas also have lower flu vaccination coverage compared with adults living in urban and suburban areas. Flu vaccination coverage among adults living in rural areas is 8 percentage points lower compared with adults living in both urban and suburban areas (40% compared with 48% for both).

This disparity in vaccine coverage based on urbanicity has been observed for several years and is widening. Data for coverage among adults by urbanicity is available since 2021-2022. Since 2021-2022, vaccination coverage by urbanicity among adults has changed as follows:

  • coverage among adults residing in rural areas is 2 percentage points lower so far this season compared with January 2022 (40% compared with 42%).
  • coverage among adults residing in suburban areas is 3 percentage points higher so far this season compared with January 2022 (48% compared with 45%).
  • coverage among adults residing in urban areas is 4 percentage points higher so far this season compared with January 2022 (48% compared with 44%).

CDC has collected survey data [5.3 MB, 27 pages]  that show rural adults are more likely to report that they do not need a flu vaccine, do not think flu vaccination is effective, and are not worried about flu disease.

More information is available from FluVaxView’s Weekly Flu Vaccination Dashboard (Figure 4C, when sorted by urbanicity for the week ending 1/13/2024).

Coverage by Race/Ethnicity

There have been improvements in vaccination coverage among Black and Hispanic adults compared with last season as of mid-January 2024. However, disparities by race and ethnicity persist and Black children and adults continue to have the lowest vaccine coverage compared with all other race/ethnicity groups.

For children , overall vaccination coverage for children was estimated to be 47.8% as of January 20, 2024, which is 3.5 percentage points lower compared with the same time last season (51.3%). The following declines in vaccination uptake this season compared with last were reported among children by race and ethnicity:

  • 4.4 percentage point decline (from 45.8% to 41.4%) among Black, non-Hispanic children
  • 5.6 percentage point decline (from 51.3% to 45.7%) among White, non-Hispanic children, and by

Hispanic children had similar coverage (50.9%) so far this season compared with last season. Coverage among children whose ethnicity is reported as “Other” (which includes Asian/Pacific Islander, Native American/Alaska Native, and two more race populations) was 53.6% and remained similar to last season. Black children have lower coverage (41.4%) than all other race/ethnicity groups.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, coverage among children by race and ethnicity has remained similar, with the exception of among White, non-Hispanic children, and among children whose ethnicity is reported as Other:

  • Coverage among Black, non-Hispanic children is about 8 percentage points lower than it was in January 2020 (41% compared with 49%)
  • Coverage among White, non-Hispanic children is about 13 percentage points lower now than it was in January 2020 (46% compared with 59%).
  • Coverage among Hispanic children is about 6 percentage points lower than it was in January 2020 (51% compared with 57%)
  • Coverage among children whose ethnicity is reported as Other (which includes Asian/Pacific Islander, Native American/Alaska Native, and two or more race populations) is 9 percentage points lower than it was in January 2020 (54% compared with 63%).

More information is available from FluVaxView’s Weekly Flu Vaccination Dashboard (Figure 2D, when sorted by race/ethnicity under the demographics tab).

For adults , overall vaccination coverage was 47% as of January 20, 2024. Vaccination coverage among most adults by race and ethnicity is lower when compared with adults who are White, non-Hispanic. Of note, Asian, non-Hispanic adults are an exception and have similar vaccination coverage compared to White, non-Hispanic adults. Data from this season indicate the following vaccination coverage disparities among adults by race and ethnicity group when compared to White, non-Hispanic adults:

  • American Indian/Alaska Native, non-Hispanic adults have lower coverage by 14.5 percentage points (35.8% to 50.4%)
  • Black, non-Hispanic adults have lower coverage by 7.9 percentage points (42.5% to 50.4%)
  • Hispanic adults have lower coverage by 11.1 percentage points (39.3% to 50.4%)
  • Multiple or Other Races, non-Hispanic adults have lower coverage by 12 percentage points (38.3% to 50.4%)
  • Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian, non-Hispanic adults have lower coverage by 11.8 percentage points (38.6% to 50.4%)

Note: Data for adults by race and ethnicity prior to the COVID-19 pandemic are not available. More coverage information on adults by race and ethnicity is available from FluVaxView’s Weekly Flu Vaccination Dashboard (Figure 4C, when sorted by race/ethnicity under the demographics tab).

Coverage Based on Immunization Information Systems (IIS)

New this season, CDC is now reporting flu vaccination coverage estimates based on Immunization Information Systems (IIS) data submitted to CDC from 47 jurisdictions monthly by age group. For most jurisdictions, flu vaccination coverage so far this season is within 5 percentage points of what these jurisdictions reported for children and adults at the same time last season (December 2022). More information is available at Weekly Flu Vaccination Dashboard | FluVaxView in the section titled “Jurisdiction Vaccine Administration and Coverage (IIS).”

For additional Information

A CDC spotlight article released on January 19, 2024, provides more information on flu vaccination coverage among children, adults and pregnant people. The latest flu vaccination data and information is available from the FluVaxView Weekly Flu Vaccination Dashboard .

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    Receiving an updated 2023-2024 COVID-19 vaccine can restore and provide enhanced protection against the variants currently responsible for most infections and hospitalizations in the United States. New data from CDC show that the updated COVID-19 vaccines were effective against COVID-19 during September 2023 - January 2024, including against ...

  18. China

    China - Traveler view | Travelers' Health | CDC Travelers Health China China Hide Travel Health Notices There are no notices currently in effect for China. Hide Vaccines and Medicines Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need.

  19. Italy, including Holy See and Vatican City Traveler View

    Stay Healthy and Safe Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Italy, so your behaviors are important. Eat and drink safely Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination.

  20. Your COVID-19 Vaccination

    Updated Sept. 22, 2023 Español Print What You Need to Know COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. CDC recommends: Everyone 5 years and older get 1 updated COVID-19 vaccine to protect against serious illness. Children aged 6 months - 4 years may need more than 1 updated COVID-19 vaccine to be up to date.

  21. Latest Covid-19 vaccine offers strong protection against ...

    A shot of the latest Covid-19 vaccine can help cut the chances of getting a symptomatic infection by half, early data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests.

  22. Early Estimates of Updated 2023-2024 (Monovalent XBB.1.5) COVID-19

    Abstract. On September 12, 2023, CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended updated 2023-2024 (updated) COVID-19 vaccination with a monovalent XBB.1.5-derived vaccine for all persons aged ≥6 months to prevent COVID-19, including severe disease.

  23. COVID vaccine: Updated shots are 54% effective for adults, CDC says

    A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that adults who received the updated COVID-19 vaccine were 54% less likely to get COVID-19.The new shots, that ...

  24. Travel

    Travel Hawaiʻi is open and ready to welcome you. There are no COVID-19 related entry requirements for domestic travelers. Travelers arriving in Hawai'i directly from an international airport must still comply with U.S. federal requirements. For updates on international travel, visit CDC.gov.

  25. Updated COVID-19 vaccines 54 percent effective against ...

    The updated COVID-19 vaccines administered this fall and winter were found to be 54 percent effective at preventing symptomatic infections among adults, according to an early analysis released by ...

  26. Opinion

    As of early January, the average number of Americans dying weekly from Covid was over 1,700. And yet the Jan. 19 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report indicated that only 21.8 percent ...

  27. What to do if you got COVID? Here are CDC's latest recommendations

    To find a COVID-19 vaccine in your area, search for the nearest vaccination locations using the online tool Vaccines.gov, then call or visit the provider's website to make an appointment.

  28. Mexico

    Updated Dengue in the Americas January 22, 2024 Dengue is a risk in many parts of Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Some countries are reporting increased numbers of cases of the disease. Travelers to the Americas can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites.

  29. 2023-2024 Flu Vaccine Coverage Update (Continued)

    February 2, 2024—This update compares flu vaccination coverage across several indicators to the same time last season as well as prior to the COVID-19 pandemic when available.. Doses Given in Pharmacies and Medical Offices. According to insurance claims data for adults 18 years and older, as of January 13, 2024, the number of flu vaccination doses given so far this season in pharmacies and ...