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Flying with Your Baby: How to Travel With Baby Formula on a Plane

Aug 24, 2023

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“Embarking on a journey with your little one is a cherished adventure, full of joy and new experiences. Yet, when it comes to jet-setting with your precious bundle and ensuring their nourishment on the go, the path might seem a bit more complex.

Fear not, intrepid parents, for in this guide, we unveil the secrets to a seamless voyage– From deciphering security protocols to crafting in-flight feeding strategies, join us as we navigate the skies together, making every mile-high moment a memory to treasure

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Preparing for Travel

Traveling with a little one in tow is an exciting endeavor, but it requires meticulous planning, especially when it comes to ensuring your baby’s nourishment. If you’re a parent who is navigating the world of flying with baby formula, fear not! In this column, we delve into the essential steps of preparing for travel, from understanding airline policies to calculating the right amount of formula needed for a smooth journey.

Researching Airline Policies and Regulations

Before you even set foot in the airport, take the time to research your chosen airline’s policies and regulations regarding traveling with baby formula bottle packs. There are crucial aspects to consider:

1. Security Regulations and Restrictions: Security measures are paramount in air travel. Be prepared for your baby formula to undergo additional screening procedures at security checkpoints. Inform the TSA officers that you’re carrying baby formula, whether it’s ready-to-feed formula, powdered formula, or breast milk. These liquids will need to be screened separately from the rest of your belongings, so ensure they are easily accessible.

2. Liquid Carry-On Rules: As a general rule, liquids are subject to restrictions, but there are exceptions for medically necessary liquids. This includes baby formula, breast milk, and baby food. While you’re allowed to bring breast milk, formula, and baby food in reasonable quantities, it’s important to note that these items do not need to fit into the quart-sized bag required for other liquids. However, you may still consider placing them in a translucent bag for easy identification.

Checking Destination Regulations

When preparing for international travel, it’s equally important to be aware of regulations and cultural considerations at your destination:

1. International Regulations: Different countries may have varying regulations concerning baby formula and other baby-related items. Some places may require special documentation for formula or breast milk. Research your destination’s customs and regulations to avoid any surprises upon arrival.

2. Cultural Considerations: Beyond regulations, consider cultural norms and practices at your destination. This is particularly crucial when it comes to breastfeeding or formula feeding in public. Understanding cultural sensitivities will help you navigate feeding your baby comfortably during your trip.

Calculating the Amount of Formula Needed

Determining the right amount of formula to bring on your journey is key to avoiding stress and ensuring your baby is well-fed throughout the trip:

1. Duration of the Flight and Layovers: Calculate the number of formula bottles, baby food, or feeds your baby will need based on the duration of the flight and any layovers. Consider whether you’ll have access to facilities on the plane for feeding or if you’ll need to rely solely on your carry-on stash.

2. Contingency Planning for Delays: Flights can sometimes experience unexpected delays. Pack extra formula to account for potential delays and unexpected situations. Having a surplus can make all the difference in keeping your baby happy and well-fed during unforeseen circumstances.

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Packing Baby Formula

As you prepare to embark on an adventure with your little one, the task of packing baby formula might seem like a puzzle with numerous pieces. Fear not, dear parents, for in this column, we’re here to guide you through the intricate process of packing baby formula for your journey. From choosing the right formula type to mastering packaging and labeling, let’s dive into the essentials that will keep your baby well-fed and content during your travels.

Choosing the Right Formula Type

Before you even begin packing your carry on bag, it’s essential to decide on the formula type that suits your travel plans and your baby’s needs:

1. Ready-to-Feed vs. Powder Formula: Ready-to-feed formula offers convenience and eliminates the need for preparation, making it a hassle-free choice for travel. On the other hand, powdered formula is compact and lightweight, making it easier to pack and carry. Consider the duration of your journey, the availability of clean water, and your baby’s feeding preferences when making this decision.

2. Considerations for Breast Milk and Formula Combination: If you’re combining breast milk and formula, plan accordingly. Breast milk can be stored in travel-friendly containers, while powdered formula can be measured and packed separately for mixing later. This way, you can cater to your baby’s needs while on the move.

Packaging and Storage

Ensuring the freshness and safety of your baby’s formula is of utmost importance when traveling:

1. Original Packaging vs. Travel-Friendly Containers: Many baby formulas come in large and bulky packaging. To save space in your carry-on bag, consider transferring a reasonable quantity of formula into travel-sized containers. This will make feeding on-the-go much more manageable. Also, limit the frozen gel packs or ice packs that you need to bring to keep the temperature of your cool formula.

2. Importance of Airtight and Spill-Proof Containers: Opt for airtight and spill-proof containers to prevent formula from spilling during turbulence or pressure changes. These containers not only preserve the formula’s quality but also spare you from any unnecessary messes.

Labeling and Documentation

Effective labeling and documentation can ease your journey through airport security and ensure your baby’s needs are met:

1. Clearly Labeling Containers: Label each container with your baby’s name and the contents. This prevents any confusion and helps TSA officers quickly identify the items during the security screening process.

2. Medical Documentation for Special Formulas: If your baby requires a special formula due to allergies or medical conditions instead of breast milk, consider carrying documentation from a healthcare professional. This can be especially helpful if your formula needs to undergo additional screening procedures.

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In-flight Feeding

As you settle into your airplane seat with your precious little one, the thought of ensuring a smooth feeding experience at 30,000 feet might seem a tad daunting. But fear not, parents, for in this column, we’re here to guide you through the ins and outs of in-flight feeding. From utilizing airline facilities to proper formula preparation, and adapting to changing time zones, we’ve got you covered for a stress-free feeding journey.

Familiarize with Airline Facilities

Before takeoff, it’s wise to familiarize yourself with the facilities your airline offers for baby feeding:

1. Availability of Hot Water and Microwaves: Some airlines provide hot water and microwaves to assist with baby feeding. Knowing this in advance can help you decide whether to bring your own supplies for formula preparation or rely on the amenities provided on the plane.

2. Requesting Assistance from Flight Attendants: Flight attendants are often more than willing to assist parents with formula preparation and other baby feeding needs such as breast milk feeding. Don’t hesitate to reach out and inquire about available facilities or help you might need during the flight.

Formula Preparation on the Plane

Proper formula preparation is crucial to ensure your baby’s safety and well-being during the flight:

1. Proper Use of Sterilized Water: If you’re using powdered formula instead of breast milk, ensure you have access to clean and sterilized water. If the airline provides hot water, use it to mix the formula, but make sure it’s not too hot for your baby’s consumption.

2. Mixing Formula Safely: When mixing formula on the plane, follow the instructions provided by the formula manufacturer. Proper mixing ensures your baby gets the necessary nutrients and hydration during the flight.

Feeding Schedule and Adapting to Time Zone Changes

Long flights often involve crossing multiple time zones, which can impact your baby’s feeding schedule:

1. Feeding Schedule: Try to stick to your baby’s regular feeding schedule as much as possible. Plan ahead and bring enough formula for scheduled feeds, taking into account potential delays.

2. Adapting to Time Zone Changes: If your flight involves crossing time zones, consider gradually adjusting your baby’s feeding schedule to match the local time at your destination. This can help minimize disruptions to their routine, especially when you’re feeding your baby with breast milk.

drinking formula

As the wheels of your journey touch down and you gather your belongings, there’s a profound sense of accomplishment that comes with successfully navigating the skies with your little one. In this comprehensive guide, we’ve embarked on a journey of our own, exploring the intricacies of traveling with baby formula on a plane. From meticulous planning to in-flight feeding strategies, we’ve covered every step of the way to ensure a seamless and stress-free experience.

Through research and preparation, you’ve become well-versed in the nuances of airline policies, destination regulations, and the art of packing baby formula. Armed with knowledge, you’ve confidently chosen the right formula type and harnessed the power of well-packaged, labeled, and documented supplies.

Remember, each flight is a unique chapter in your family’s story, and as you write those chapters, you’re crafting memories and imparting invaluable lessons of resilience and adaptability. You’ve shown that with preparation, patience, and a touch of flexibility, you can soar to new heights with your baby by your side.

Did this article help? Please let us know in the comments. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask.

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The Baby's Brew

How to Travel with Baby Formula (By Plane or In the Car)

Posted by Jane Springston on May 12, 2021

Going on vacation with your baby is both exciting and daunting. At this point you’ve likely reached a comfort level caring for your little one and have even mastered outings during the day. Now you’re ready to take on traveling with your baby, but you know there is a lot to consider. And that includes managing all those feedings and what the heck is the best way to travel with baby formula?!

It can seem challenging when you’ve never done it before, but with the right knowledge and a few expert tips, traveling with your little one and her formula doesn’t have to be hard. 

Planning Ahead for Feeding Your Formula-Fed Baby While You Travel

Whether you are heading to your destination by airplane or car, planning ahead is going to make all the difference in making your vacation with your baby a positive experience. We cover many our top suggestions in our article, “ Tips for Traveling With Your Baby .”

You’ll want to take extra time to plan out what you need for your baby’s formula feedings. You can utilize the following checklist to ensure you have everything you need:

  • Formula - If you’re traveling domestically, chances are that there will be a store nearby that sells the type of formula you give to your baby. But be sure to do your research ahead of time to ensure this is the case. We recommend bringing more than enough formula along with you anyway, so that you don’t have to be rushing out on your vacation trying to buy more. 
  • Bottles - Once you get to your hotel or destination, you’ll be able to sanitize your baby’s bottles. But until then, you’ll want to have enough to get you through your trip. For example, if you’ll be on a plane, you don’t want to have to worry about cleaning any bottles mid-flight so make sure you bring enough to get you through.
  • Portable Bottle Warmer - A travel bottle warmer is a life-saver when traveling with your baby. It’s going to be difficult to access warm water to make your baby’s formula bottle, so a bottle warmer will do the trick. The Baby’s Brew portable bottle warmer is perfect because it easily fits in a diaper bag and will warm your baby’s formula in advance so it’s ready when they are. 
  • Formula Dispenser - These take the mess out of bottle making while making portioning out your baby’s bottle super simple. We list our favorites in this article !
  • Water - You can’t make a formula bottle without it (unless of course you use ready-to-feed formula). In terms of what water to use for your baby’s bottles, tap water is generally regarded as safe to use, but if you can bring your own sterilized water from home that’s even better. 

Along with what you’ll need to make the bottle, you’ll also want to have what you need to keep your little one clean. Burp cloths and baby wipes are something you’ll want to have on hand. Our checklist works great for both plane and car travel, but these trips will bring different challenges so let’s get into the specifics.

Traveling with Baby Formula By Plane

baby formula for travel

Because there are so many rules about what you can and can’t take with you on a plane, of course you’re going to be a bit concerned about how you’re going to manage your baby’s formula feedings on the airplane.

Many parents wonder, “ Can you travel with baby formula on a plane?”

Luckily, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is much less strict about bringing liquids onto a plane that are for babies and young children. 

The rules in regard to formula, breast milk and juice, according to their website, is as follows:

“ Formula, breast milk and juice for infants or toddlers are permitted in reasonable quantities through the security checkpoint. Remove these items from your carry-on bag to be screened separately from the rest of your belongings.”

The part about “reasonable quantities” can be a bit confusing, but they likely won’t question the amount you have especially if your little one is with you. Just be sure to notify the TSA officer right away that you have formula in your bag that exceeds the typical maximum of 3.4 ounces.

You can also skip putting it through the x-ray machine or tell them you don’t want them to open it, but they will need to use a different method of screening.

Going through security is often stressful enough even without a baby and all of their formula, so it’s important to be relaxed about the process and give yourself plenty of extra time to get through this portion of the travel process. Remember that you aren’t the first parents to pass through security with a little one, so the process should go smoothly.  

Top Tips for Easy Plane Traveling with Formula

So you can rest easy knowing you’ll be able to take your baby’s formula on the plane with you (whether that’s already liquid in a bottle or stored in powdered form), but the next step is navigating bringing it along and giving it to your baby in the easiest way possible.

From avoiding messes to timing those feedings just right, here are our top tips for bringing that formula along as you cruise the friendly skies.

  • Prepare Bottles Ahead - You will already have plenty to worry about as you’re navigating the airport and boarding the plane, so don’t add bottle-making to the list if you don’t have to. According to Kids Health , formula may be prepared up to 24 hours in advance, as long as it's refrigerated. We suggest taking advantage of this and storing your baby’s bottles in a cooler bag. That way when it’s time to warm one up, you just pull a bottle out of the bag.
  • Warm Bottles Ahead - Above we recommended taking along a travel bottle warmer. We suggest using one like the Baby’s Brew where you can begin warming the bottle at the push of a button and that can be warmed well in advance. That way, the minute your baby gets hungry, you’ll have the bottle ready and you can avoid the tears. 
  • Feed Your Baby During Take-Off - We suggest trying to time your baby’s feed with take-off. Even if it’s not technically “meal time” you may try offering your little one a bottle. This can help with plugged ears and make for a peaceful transition into your flight. (And of course cross your fingers that it will soon send them off to dreamland for a good portion of the flight.)

Traveling with Baby Formula By Car

baby formula for travel

For many, traveling with a baby by car can seem a little less overwhelming. Because they’ve likely been in the car many times before and you don’t have to worry about your baby crying and bothering other passengers, it’s usually a little less stressful. However, car trips often mean more time spent traveling. This means you’ll have to be a bit more strategic about your baby’s bottle feedings.

Even if your baby is old enough to hold their own bottle, it’s not recommended that you feed your baby while the car is moving. According to Hygeia Health , “Bottles become projectiles in the event of the crash,” and “Motion sickness is something to consider.” Therefore, you’ll have to plan out when you’ll need to stop to feed your little one - whether that’s at a rest stop or when your family stops to get a bite to eat. 

Top Tips for Easy Car Travel with Formula

Formula-feeding while road tripping gets easier the more times you do it, especially when you have the right strategies in place to keep your baby happy with a full tummy. 

  • Prepare Bottles Ahead - This tip we recommended for plane travel works great for car travel as well. Because it’s so important to have clean hands to prepare bottles, it’s just better to have this already done. Pit stops on road trips don’t usually make for the cleanest places anyway. Just be sure you keep the bottles of pre-made formula cold and use them within 24 hours. 
  • Keep Everything Up Front - There is nothing worse than finally getting on your way and realizing that something you need is in the back of your car. Even though we don’t recommend giving your baby their bottle while the car is moving, we DO suggest getting the bottle prepped ahead of time. Be sure you have access to your baby’s bottles and bottle warmer so that you can start the warming process ahead of time so that it’s ready to go when it’s time to stop. 
  • Be Ready to Store Used Bottles - Because you probably won’t be able to clean your baby’s bottles until you arrive at your final stop of the day, we suggest having a wet bag to store them in. That way you won’t have bottles cluttering up your car and you can sanitize them later on while easily wiping up your wetbag so it’s ready to use again. 

Formula Feeding When You Arrive

You’ve arrived at your hotel or your final stop and you can finally breathe a sigh of relief!

It definitely feels good to get to this point when you’ve been traveling with a baby all day. At this point you’ll want to get your baby’s bottles all sanitized and ready for the next day. If you have formula bottles that you didn’t use and it’s still within 24 hours, be sure to transfer those to the fridge. (Pro tip: ALWAYS stay somewhere that has a fridge when you have a baby.)

The last thing to do is fill your baby up with one more formula bottle before you all crash into bed...because after all that travel, you will surely be ready for sleep!

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Have Baby Will Travel

How to Travel with Baby Formula

How to Travel with Baby Formula - Have Baby Will Travel

Feeding our babies is the most important thing we do as parents. And the amount of pressure we put on ourselves over what to feed them and how to feed them carries over into travel. Travel with baby formula definitely requires planning in advance. The length of your journey and your destination will determine exactly how much you need to bring and how you need to bring it.

Packing Formula

You’ll need to pack formula for your travel day, and for the duration of your vacation if you aren’t certain your brand will be available where you’re going. Depending on the age of your baby and their tolerance for change, switching brands or formulations while on vacation is not recommended. Baby items are difficult to come by in airports and on the road. Always, always pack more feeds than you think you will need in your carry-on . And even if your brand is available at your destination, not having to rush out to a store when you arrive is worth packing extra.

FAA regulations allow for more than the allowed liquid requirements when traveling with a baby under two. Within reason . They aren’t going to allow you to go through security with a gallon of distilled water. However, it is safe to prepare powdered formula with bottled water. It must be below 200 mg/litre of sodium and no more than 250mg/litre of sulphate. Most brands fall well within these amounts.

Powdered Formula vs. Ready-to-Drink

If you are already feeding ready-to-drink formula, and you don’t think it will be available at your destination, it’s safe to say your luggage will be very heavy. Consider switching before your trip if possible. For ease of identification, travel with a can of the formula powder. The travel formula containers make life very easy in terms of portioning and mixing while en route. Although having the can handy for identification makes life easier while going through security.

Mixing Formula

Probably my biggest and best tip for travel with baby formula is to get baby accustomed to drinking room temperature bottles. Mixing formula while traveling is not such a big deal, however heating it up might be. Juggling cups of boiling water is no picnic if you’re also managing a hungry baby. Certainly there are portable baby bottle warmers designed for travel. If you have the money and the carry-on space for an extra gadget, and baby can’t tolerate a non-warmed bottle, then it’s worth the investment.

Traveling with Bottles

Bottles take up a lot of space. Although the powdered formula doesn’t take up a lot of room, the pre-sterilized bottles do. If your travel day is 12 hours, and baby feeds every four hours, that’s three bottles (plus at least two extra in case of delays). So there’s five empty bottles (plus nipples, plus caps) you need to pack and keep clean.

The pre-sterilized bottle liners definitely save space and make life easier for travel.

Washing and Sterilizing Bottles

Is it really a vacation if you’re still washing and sterilizing bottles? Of course! It’s not necessary to travel with a bottle sterilizer if you have access to (or pack) a travel kettle. However, if your accommodation has a kitchen or at least a microwave, the steam sterilizers are fairly compact and the sterilizer bags even more so.

Making bottle maintenance a part of your routine while on vacation is just part of travel with baby formula and once it’s done you can enjoy your evening together.

Have Baby Will Travel  is a participant in the  Amazon Services LLC Associates/Influencer Program . If you make a purchase through this site, we may receive a small commission.  Click here to check out our Amazon Store .

  • Tips for Feeding Baby on Holiday
  • How to Sterilize Bottles in a Hotel Room Sink
  • Bottle Feeding Travel Tips
  • How to Travel with a Breastfeeding Baby
  • Infant Travel: Planning Your First Trip with Baby
  • Everything You Need to Know About Traveling with a Newborn

Photo by  Jaye Haych  on  Unsplash

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How To Travel With Baby Formula And Food

Travelpro Travel Expert Editor

Tips & Tricks

How To Travel With Baby Formula And Food

Planning a family trip is exciting, but packing for it can be overwhelming, especially if you plan to fly with your little ones. You can travel with milk, formula, or baby food no matter where you are. When you must pass through airport security and have enough supplies on hand for days, handling these items requires some simple preparation.

Before packing your bags, here are a few tips on traveling with baby formula and food so that you – and the whole family – stay happy.

Can you bring baby formula on a plane

The TSA classifies baby formula as medically necessary, so you can pack as much baby formula as you need for the trip without being limited to the 3.4-ounce rule that applies to other liquids. When you go through security screening, inform airport security of the amount of baby formula you’re carrying. Remove the formula from your carry-on so the agent can screen it separately. TSA officers may test the liquid to confirm it is baby formula and not a prohibited liquid.

Can you bring powdered formula on a plane?

You can pack unmixed baby formula in your carry-on. As with premixed powder, inform the TSA agent you have the baby formula during screening. Ideally, keep the formula in its original packaging. Security may test a small portion of the formula for prohibited substances but will not add anything to the formula package.

Breast or Store-Bought Milk

The rules for breast milk are the same as for baby formula. You can bring as much breast milk as you need for the trip in your carry-on, preferably stored in transparent bottles. The same rules apply if you’re wondering how to travel with milk for a 1-year-old. Milk for older children will be subject to the same 3-1-1 rules as other liquids.

Can you bring baby food on a plane

You can bring baby and toddler food on a plane in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces, including jars and baby food pouches of fruits, vegetables, and meat/poultry purees. Store the food in well-sealed containers separate from the rest of your personal belongings.

Can you bring homemade baby food on a plane?

Homemade baby food is allowed in carry-on bags but may be subject to additional screening by TSA agents. Label all homemade baby food before packing, and have it stored in an accessible location in your carry-on bag.

How to keep baby formula and food safe on board

Once you have figured out just how much baby formula powder/ breastmilk and food you should pack, you need to plan how to keep the food safe. Some trips can be long and involve many more hours than just your flight time. How can you ensure your baby’s food stays fresh?

Here are a few things you can do to ensure that your baby's food and formula are safe during travel:

  • A travel cooler  bag is your best bet for day trips to week-long adventures. Some are made for wet and dry foods and can be used to keep food warm or cold.
  • Check baby food and formula containers for expiration and refrigeration requirements
  • Use ice packs to keep food and formula cold when needed.
  • Avoid giving your baby food from open containers that have been sitting out at room temperature for more than two hours.
  • Do not heat baby food or formula using the airplane's microwave.

Being prepared by following these few guidelines will give you peace of mind for a safe and healthy trip. Check out more of our family travel blogs for other helpful tips and tricks on kid- and baby-friendly travel.

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Tsa rules for traveling with baby formula.

If you’re traveling with an infant, then bringing baby formula with you is essential. It can be confusing to figure out what the TSA’s rules are when it comes to bringing baby formula on a plane. This guide will provide an overview of the TSA’s rules for traveling with baby formula, so you can be prepared and have a stress-free trip.

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TSA Rules For Flying With Baby Formula

Traveling with a baby can be stressful, especially when it comes to navigating airport security with their essentials like baby formula. However, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has rules in place to make sure that baby formula is allowed on board planes without any issues.

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Firstly, the TSA allows travelers to bring an unlimited amount of baby formula or breast milk through security. It does not have to be stored in a clear, plastic bag like other liquids, but it must be declared to the TSA officer during the screening process. Additionally, travelers are allowed to bring ice packs, freezer packs, and gel packs to keep their baby formula cold. However, if these items are not completely frozen or solid when going through security, they may be subject to additional screening or even confiscation.

baby formula for travel

When it comes to bringing baby formula on the plane, it can be brought in either carry-on baggage or checked baggage. If bringing it in carry-on baggage, it is recommended to place it in a clear plastic bag for easy inspection by the TSA officer. If bringing it in checked baggage, it is still important to pack it properly and securely to prevent any leakage or damage. It may be a good idea to pack it in a separate bag within the checked baggage for extra protection.

In summary, the TSA rules for flying with baby formula are that it can be brought through security without any limitations, it can be brought in carry-on or checked baggage, and ice packs or freezer packs can also be brought to keep the formula cold. By following these rules and properly packing the baby formula, traveling with a little one can be much less stressful.

TSA Rules For Flying With Breast Milk

If you’re traveling with breast milk, there are specific TSA rules you’ll need to follow to ensure that you can bring it with you on the plane. Here are some key guidelines to keep in mind:

  • Breast milk is exempt from the TSA’s liquids restrictions. This means you can bring as much breast milk as you need, as long as it’s for your baby.
  • Breast milk must be in a container that holds no more than 5.4 ounces (or 160 milliliters).
  • Breast milk can be in either a bottle, storage bag or packing cube .
  • You must inform TSA officers that you have breast milk in your carry-on luggage before going through security.
  • You may be asked to undergo additional screening procedures to verify the contents of your breast milk.
  • If you’re traveling with a breast pump, you may bring it as a carry-on or checked baggage.

It’s also worth noting that some airlines have their own policies regarding traveling with breast milk. For example, some airlines may allow you to bring an ice pack to keep your breast milk chilled during the flight. Others may require you to inform them in advance that you’ll be traveling with breast milk. As always, it’s a good idea to double-check with your airline and the TSA before you travel to ensure that you have all the information you need to make your trip as smooth as possible.

Rules For Flights In The USA

When it comes to traveling with baby formula in the USA, the TSA has specific guidelines that must be followed. First and foremost, you are allowed to bring baby formula in your carry-on bag in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces. This includes ready-to-feed formula, powdered formula, and liquid concentrate formula.

It is important to note that you may be required to undergo additional screening at the security checkpoint. This could include a thorough inspection of your baby formula, so it is best to keep it in its original packaging and make it easily accessible. If you prefer to bring your baby formula in your checked baggage, you can do so as well. Just make sure it is packed securely and labeled clearly. It is also recommended to bring a copy of the manufacturer’s instructions in case TSA needs to inspect it. While the TSA does allow for the transportation of baby formula, it is important to remember that the 3-1-1 rule still applies to other liquids, such as water and juice. Any liquids that are not related to your baby’s needs will need to adhere to the standard TSA guidelines.

In summary, traveling with baby formula in the USA is allowed, but it is important to follow TSA guidelines and be prepared for potential additional screening. Whether you choose to bring it in your carry-on or checked baggage, ensure it is packed securely and labeled clearly to avoid any confusion.

Rules For Flights In Other Countries

If you’re planning on traveling internationally with your baby and need to bring formula, you’ll need to be aware of the rules for flights in other countries. In general, most countries follow similar rules as those in the US, but there may be slight variations to be aware of. Firstly, it’s always a good idea to check the airline’s specific policies for bringing baby formula onboard. Some airlines may have additional requirements or restrictions, so it’s best to double check before your flight.

When traveling to another country, you should also research their specific customs and border protection agency’s rules for bringing in baby formula and other liquids such as honey . For example, some countries may have restrictions on the amount of baby formula that can be brought in or require a doctor’s note or import permit.

In addition, if you plan to transfer flights or have a layover in another country, you’ll also need to be aware of their rules for bringing baby formula onboard. It’s possible that you may need to adhere to the stricter of the rules between the countries you are traveling to and through. As always, it’s recommended that you bring only what you’ll need for the duration of your trip to minimize any potential issues at customs or security checkpoints. And remember to properly label and store your baby formula and any other baby food or snacks to ensure their safety during your travels. By understanding the rules for flights in other countries, you can be well-prepared for a stress-free journey with your little one.

Bringing Baby Formula In Your Carry-On

If you’re flying with a baby , it’s important to pack their baby formula carefully to ensure it’s allowed on the plane. Luckily, TSA has specific rules for traveling with baby formula, and as long as you follow these guidelines, you shouldn’t have any problems getting through security.

When it comes to carrying baby formula in your carry-on, there are a few rules you need to be aware of. First and foremost, any baby formula or food that is liquid, gel, or aerosol must be placed in containers that are 3.4 ounces or less and stored in a clear, quart-sized plastic bag. This bag should be placed in an easily accessible location in your carry-on so that it can be quickly and easily removed at security. It’s important to note that this 3.4-ounce limit is per container, so if you’re carrying a larger bottle of formula, it will need to be divided into smaller containers. This may be a bit of a hassle, but it’s necessary to comply with TSA regulations.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you may be asked to open the containers of baby formula or food during the security screening process. This is to ensure that the contents are indeed baby formula and not a prohibited item. If you’re uncomfortable with opening the containers, you can request that a TSA officer use a swab to test the contents instead.

Finally, if you’re traveling with pre-mixed liquid baby formula, you can bring as much as you need for the flight in your carry-on. However, if you’re traveling internationally, you may be subject to different rules depending on the country you’re visiting, so be sure to check ahead of time. Overall, as long as you follow the rules outlined by TSA, you shouldn’t have any problems bringing baby formula in your carry-on. Just make sure to pack it carefully and have it easily accessible for security screening.

Bringing Baby Formula In Checked Baggage

If you are traveling with a larger amount of baby formula, you may choose to bring it in your checked baggage. In general, the same rules apply for checked bags as they do for carry-on bags. You can pack as much formula as you need in your checked baggage, but it is important to make sure that it is properly stored and secured to prevent spills and leaks. Consider placing the formula in a plastic bag or container to avoid any messes in your suitcase.

It is also recommended to pack the formula in your checked baggage if you will not need it during your flight. This way, you will have more space in your carry-on for other essentials. Remember that some countries may have restrictions on bringing certain liquids or powders into the country, so be sure to check with your airline or the destination country’s regulations before packing baby formula in your checked baggage.

Overall, bringing baby formula in your checked baggage can be a convenient option for parents traveling with a larger supply. Just make sure to pack it carefully and follow any applicable regulations to ensure a smooth and stress-free travel experience.

Do I Have To Take Out Baby Formula At Security?

Yes, you do. According to TSA regulations, all liquids, including baby formula and your baby car seat , should be taken out of your carry-on bags and screened separately. This means that you need to take your baby formula out of your carry-on and place it in a separate bin for screening. TSA officers may ask you to open the container and test the formula for security reasons. To make the screening process smoother, you can keep your baby formula in an easily accessible spot in your carry-on bag. TSA recommends packing your formula in a clear plastic bag to keep it organized and make the screening process easier.

baby formula for travel

Note that you don’t have to take out your baby formula from checked baggage. You can keep it in its original packaging or a clear plastic bag and pack it in your checked luggage. It’s also worth noting that TSA may allow a reasonable amount of formula, breast milk, or juice in excess of 3.4 ounces in your carry-on if you’re traveling with a baby or a young child. However, you may need to declare these items at the security checkpoint for inspection. To avoid any delays or issues at security, it’s always a good idea to check the TSA guidelines before your trip and pack your baby formula accordingly.

What Other Baby Foods Are Allowed On Plane?

Aside from baby formula, there are other types of baby food that are allowed on planes. These include:

  • Breast Milk : If you are breastfeeding, you are allowed to bring breast milk on a plane. You do not have to worry about the liquid restrictions that apply to other types of liquids, but you may be required to declare it to TSA officers at the security checkpoint.
  • Baby Food In Jars Or Pouches : You are allowed to bring jars or pouches of baby food on a plane. These are considered to be liquid, so they must be packed in your checked luggage if they exceed the 3.4-ounce limit.
  • Snacks For Toddlers : If your child is eating solid food, you can bring snacks like crackers, cheese, fruit, and veggies on the plane.
  • Teething Biscuits : Teething biscuits are also allowed on a plane, but be aware that they can crumble and make a mess.

It’s important to note that TSA may inspect your baby food items to ensure that they are safe for travel. Be prepared to have your items inspected and be patient with TSA officers during the process.

Can You Use Your Baby Formula On A Plane?

Yes, you can use your baby formula on a plane. However, it is important to keep in mind that once the plane has taken off, you may not have access to hot water to warm the formula. Additionally, if you are traveling with pre-mixed formula, it is best to bring enough for the duration of the flight since flight attendants may not be able to provide additional formula during the flight. It is also important to ensure that the formula is stored properly and remains within a safe temperature range.

If you are traveling with a baby under two years old, many airlines, such as American Airlines , will allow you to bring a car seat on board the plane. This can be helpful for keeping your baby safe and comfortable during the flight, as well as for securely holding the bottle while your baby feeds. Alternatively, you may choose to hold your baby and feed them the bottle directly. Overall, using baby formula on a plane is allowed and common. Just be sure to plan ahead and take necessary precautions to keep your baby safe and comfortable during the flight.

Can I Breast Feed On A Plane?

Yes, you can breastfeed on a plane. The TSA permits breastfeeding on board, and most airlines also allow mothers to breastfeed their babies during the flight. You don’t have to cover up, but you may want to use a nursing cover for privacy if you prefer. However, if you are concerned about the potential for turbulence, you may want to consider breastfeeding before takeoff or after landing. Additionally, if you need assistance finding a comfortable spot to breastfeed, don’t hesitate to ask a flight attendant for help. They are usually happy to assist mothers in finding a comfortable spot. Remember, you have the right to breastfeed your baby in public, and the same applies when you are traveling by air.

How Much Baby Formula Can You Take On A Plane?

One of the most common questions asked by parents traveling with young children is how much baby formula they are allowed to bring on a plane. The answer depends on a few factors, including the length of your flight, your destination, and the policies of the airline you’re flying with. In general, TSA regulations allow you to bring a reasonable amount of baby formula or breast milk on board a flight. This means that you are allowed to bring enough for the duration of your journey, plus a little extra just in case of delays.

For domestic flights within the USA, there are no specific limits on how much baby formula you can bring, but it must be in containers of no more than 3.4 ounces (100 ml) each, and it must be placed in a clear plastic bag for security screening. You are allowed to bring multiple containers as long as they fit in the bag and don’t exceed the volume limit.

For international flights, the rules can vary depending on your destination. Some countries may have restrictions on the amount of baby formula and medical marijuana you can bring, or require a doctor’s note if you’re carrying a large quantity. It’s important to check with your airline and the embassy or consulate of your destination country before you travel to make sure you’re following all the necessary rules. If you’re traveling with a baby, you can also bring pre-mixed formula in ready-to-feed bottles on board the plane, although they can take up more space in your carry-on luggage. Powdered formula is also allowed, but it’s important to note that you may be asked to open the container and have it tested by security.

Finally, it’s important to keep your baby formula and baby food safe and cool during your journey. You can bring a small insulated bag or cooler to store your baby’s food, and ask for ice from the flight attendants if needed. In summary, the amount of baby formula you can bring on a plane depends on your destination and airline, but in general, you’re allowed to bring enough for the duration of your flight plus a little extra. Make sure to follow the TSA rules for carry-on liquids and keep your baby’s food safe and cool during the journey.

Can You Bring Baby Formula Powder On A Plane?

Yes, you can bring baby formula powder on a plane, but it may be subject to additional security screening . Powdered formula is not considered a liquid, so it is exempt from the 3-1-1 rule, which limits the amount of liquids you can bring in your carry-on bag. However, because powdered formula looks similar to other powders, it may be subject to additional screening by TSA agents. This may involve a swab test or a manual inspection of the powder container. To avoid any delays at the security checkpoint, it’s a good idea to pack the formula powder in its original packaging, with the ingredients list visible, and to label it as baby formula.

It’s also worth noting that some airlines have restrictions on the size of containers for baby formula powder. For example, Delta Air Lines allows containers up to 12 ounces in carry-on bags, while American Airlines allows up to 18 ounces. Be sure to check with your airline before packing your formula powder to ensure compliance with their policies. Overall, it is possible to bring baby formula powder on a plane, but it’s important to follow the rules and guidelines set forth by the TSA and your airline to ensure a smooth and hassle-free travel experience.

How To Keep Baby Formula And Baby Food Safe On Board?

Once you have made sure that your baby formula is allowed on board, it is important to ensure that it stays safe during the flight. Here are some tips on how to do that:

  • Pack It Correctly : Whether you are bringing baby formula in your carry-on or checked baggage, it is important to pack it properly as you would your baby stroller . Keep the formula in its original packaging and seal it tightly. If you are bringing bottles, make sure they are tightly sealed as well.
  • Keep It At The Right Temperature : Baby formula needs to be kept at a certain temperature to stay safe. If you are traveling with pre-mixed formula, keep it in an insulated bag with ice packs. If you are bringing powdered formula, mix it with cooled boiled water just before feeding your baby.
  • Use It Before It Expires : Check the expiration date on your baby formula and make sure you use it before it expires. It is best to bring enough formula for your entire trip, as you may not be able to find the same brand or type of formula at your destination.
  • Ask For Hot Water On Board : If you need to mix powdered formula on board, you can ask the flight attendant for hot water. They may be able to provide it, but keep in mind that it may not be at the perfect temperature for your baby’s needs.

By following these tips, you can ensure that your baby formula stays safe during your flight. Remember, always consult with your doctor or pediatrician before making any changes to your baby’s feeding routine or traveling plans.

The Bottom Line

If you are traveling with a baby and need to bring formula, the good news is that the TSA allows you to do so. It’s important to follow their guidelines to ensure a smooth and hassle-free security screening process. Remember to bring only as much formula as you need for the duration of your flight and pack it securely in your carry-on or checked luggage. Additionally, be sure to familiarize yourself with any additional regulations specific to the country you are flying to. By taking these precautions, you can ensure that your baby will have everything they need to stay fed and comfortable during your trip.

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Tips for Flying With a Baby

baby formula for travel

Everything you need to know about flying with your baby.

Whether you're a first-time parent or a seasoned traveler, navigating the skies with a baby gets a lot easier with thoughtful planning and preparation. In this guide, we'll explore essential tips for flying with an infant, discuss age considerations, provide a checklist of must-haves, and offer creative solutions for keeping your baby entertained during the flight.

Checklist for Flying With Your Baby:

  • Identification: Ensure you have a copy of your baby's identification, such as a birth certificate.
  • Car seat or FAA-approved restraint system: Follow airline guidelines for using a car seat on board.
  • Diapers and wipes: Pack more than enough for the duration of the flight.
  • Formula or breast milk: You’ll want to prepare your formula or breastmilk in advance, unless you opt for ready-to-use formulas.*
  • Container for formula: Prepared formula and/or opened ready-to-use formula needs to be refrigerated--many travelers like to designate this as the “baby bag” where they put any snacks, baby food, and medication.*
  • Change of clothes: Accidents happen, so pack an extra outfit for your baby.
  • Comfort items: Bring items that soothe your baby, such as a favorite toy or blanket.
  • Medication: Carry any necessary medications as prescribed by your doctor.

Essential Baby Travel Tips

1. plan ahead for feedings.

Ensure that you have enough formula or breast milk for the entire flight, taking into account potential delays. If you’re using a ready-to-use formula, it can help to purchase smaller containers to make on-the-go storage easier.

2. Pack Extra Diapers and Wipes

Accidents happen, and it's better to be over-prepared. Pack more diapers and wipes than you think you'll need, and have a changing pad for in-flight diaper changes.

3. Choose the Right Flight Time

Ideally there might be flights that align with your baby's nap schedule. A well-rested baby is more likely to be calm and content during the journey.

4. Create a Calm Environment

There’s going to be a lot of stimulation and new experiences for your little one, and every baby will respond differently to that environment. The best thing you can do is to create comfort for your baby with fun and games. Bring your baby's favorite blanket, stuffed animal, or pacifier with you, and if you can, give yourself as much time as possible to get to the airport so that you don’t have to feel rushed. Your baby will likely respond to your cues, and your calmness can help them feel at ease.

5. Check Airline Policies

Understand the specific policies of the airline you're flying with regarding baby amenities, such as bassinets, baby food, and stroller check-in.

What Can Ease Ear Pain for Babies During Flights?

Sometimes cabin pressure changes during takeoff and landing can hurt your baby’s ears. Generally speaking, children and babies can be more sensitive to these changes in pressure than adults, and while the effects are temporary, it can be unfamiliar and therefore scary for your little one to experience at first. Here are some tips for helping them find relief:

  • Bring pacifiers and teething toys: Biting, chewing, and sucking can all help loosen things up behind the ears.
  • Feed just before or during the flight: the motion of swallowing can also help loosen things up behind the ears, and having a full belly can help keep your little one calm.
  • Clear the ear: clogged ears can make the ear popping more painful. Cleaning your little one’s ears (and yours) before the flight can go a long way! Just make sure to safely clean your baby’s ears with a damp washcloth to dab the wax out instead of using a Q-tip to drive it deeper into the ear canal.
  • See your doctor before flying with an ear infection: if your baby has an ear infection, your doctor may recommend that you wait to fly until after recovery.
  • Keep them engaged: As the plane takes off or starts to descend, try keeping your baby engaged with a song or dance– smiles and laughter can always help babies loosen up!

How Old Should a Baby Be to Fly?

It is generally safe for babies to fly as early as a few days old, but it’s always best to consult with your pediatrician before planning a trip, especially if your baby was born prematurely or has a medical condition. Some airlines may have specific age requirements, so be sure to check their policies before booking.

How To Travel With Baby Formula

When traveling with baby formula, you can opt for the convenience of ready-to-use formula–that way you don’t need to worry about measuring and mixing on the go. And for parents looking for hypoallergenic options, there is Nutramigen® Hypoallergenic Infant Formula - Ready to Use , which happens to be the #1 pediatrician recommended formula brand for Cow’s Milk Allergy.

Our Nutramigen infant formula is designed to give nutrition your baby needs for healthy development while helping to provide relief from colic they may be experiencing due to cow’s milk allergy. It’s also lactose-free, and has DHA and ARA, nutrients that are found in breast milk that support baby’s brain and eye development.

Tips for Traveling With Nutramigen®

  • Pack the formula in a separate insulated bag to keep it at the right temperature, and check with the airline for any specific regulations or guidelines regarding the transportation of baby formula.*
  • Ensure you have enough formula for the entire trip and consider bringing a few extra servings in case of unexpected delays.

How To Entertain Babies on a Flight

All the stimulation and new experiences don’t have to be stressful--they can be exciting! Don’t be afraid to show your baby around if they’re excited by all the new things--some little explorers get frustrated if they feel bored or like they’re missing out on the action.

Pack a Variety of Toys

Bring small, quiet toys that capture your baby's attention, like soft rattles or plush books.

Engage in Interactive Play

Play peek-a-boo, sing nursery rhymes, or engage in other interactive games to keep your baby entertained. If you have a window seat, show your baby the clouds passing by. Sit your baby in your lap and help them pretend they’re flying the plane--there’s all sorts of fun and creative ways to keep them occupied--the sky's the limit!

Allow for Exploration

If it's safe to do so, let your baby explore their surroundings within the confines of your seat area. Show them how the tray table opens and closes. When safe to do so, take a walk around the cabin. Introduce them to the flight attendants--sometimes meeting new people and seeing smiling faces can add to the fun! Just keep an eye out for when your baby might be getting tired or overwhelmed, and have a safe space in your seat where they can relax.

Let the Motion Soothe Them

If your baby loves falling asleep in the car, they might also like a flight if it feels like a car ride. If your little one wants to rest, count your lucky stars and let them get that shuteye!

Take to the Skies With Enfamil Family Beginnings®

When you sign up for Enfamil Family Beginnings , not only do you unlock a wealth of expert advice and valuable coupons, but you also gain access to resources that can make flying with your baby a breeze. Enfamil Family Beginnings provides the tools to navigate parenthood with confidence, making your travels with a little one an enjoyable and nourishing experience.

*Follow label instructions for preparation and storage.

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All information on Enfamil , including but not limited to information about health, medical conditions, and nutrition, is intended for your general knowledge and is not a substitute for a healthcare professional's medical identification, advice, or management for specific medical conditions. You should seek medical care and consult your doctor or pediatrician for any specific health or nutrition issues. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment, care, or help because of information you have read on Enfamil .

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Traveling with Children

All passengers are required to undergo screening. However, TSA has developed modified screening procedures for children who appear to be 12 years old and younger. TSA officers will consult parents or the traveling guardian about the child’s screening.

TSA standard screening procedures apply for children 13 years and older. Carry-on property of all passengers, regardless of age, must be screened. All passengers who alarm will undergo additional screening.

Children with Medical Conditions, Disabilities, or Mobility Aids

Inform the TSA officer if the child has a disability, medical condition or medical device.

Let the TSA officer know if your child is able to walk through the metal detector or needs to be carried through the metal detector by a parent/guardian. You may carry your child through the WTMD. The TSA officer will not remove your child from their mobility aid, wheelchair or scooter.

Request Assistance

TSA Cares provides information to passengers with disabilities, medical conditions and those that need additional assistance to better prepare for the security screening process. Call  TSA Cares 72 hours prior  to traveling with questions about screening policies, procedures and what to expect at the security checkpoint. You may also call to request assistance at the checkpoint.

Liquid Formula, Breast Milk, Toddler Drinks, and Baby/Toddler food (to include puree pouches)

Formula, breast milk, toddler drinks and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces or 100 milliliters are allowed in carry-on baggage and do not need to fit within a quart-sized bag. Formula, breast milk, toddler drinks and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) are considered medically necessary liquids. This also applies to breast milk and formula cooling accessories, such as ice packs, freezer packs and gel packs (regardless of presence of breast milk). Your child or infant does not need to be present or traveling with you to bring breast milk, formula and/or related supplies.

Inform the TSA officer at the beginning of the screening process that you are carrying formula, breast milk, toddler drinks and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) in excess of 3.4 ounces. Remove these items from your carry-on bag to be screened separately from your other belongings. TSA officers may need to test the liquids for explosives or concealed prohibited items.

It’s helpful to the officers when formula and breast milk are in clear, translucent bottles and not plastic bags or pouches. Liquids in plastic bags or pouches may not be able to be screened by Bottle Liquid Scanners, and you may be asked to open them (if feasible) for alternate screening such as Explosive Trace Detection and Vapor Analysis for the presence of liquid explosives. Screening will never include placing anything into the medically necessary liquid.

TSA X-ray machines are not harmful to food or medicines. However, if you do not want the formula, breast milk, toddler drinks, and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) to be X-rayed or opened, please inform the TSA officer. Additional steps will be taken to resolve alarms. You or the traveling guardian will undergo additional screening procedures, to include Advanced Imaging Technology screening and additional/enhanced screening of other carry-on property.

Ice packs, freezer packs, frozen gel packs and other accessories required to cool formula, breast milk, toddler drinks and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) – regardless of the presence of breast milk – are also allowed in carry-ons, along with liquid-filled teethers. If these items are partially frozen or slushy, they are subject to the same screening as described above.

Passengers requiring special accommodations or concerned about the security screening process at the airport may request assistance by contacting  TSA Cares  or by phone at (855) 787-2227.

Screening of Children’s Items

  • Place all carry-on baggage such as children's toys, bags and blankets on the X-ray belt for screening.
  • Strollers, umbrella-strollers, baby carriers, car and booster seats and backpacks must be screened by X-ray.
  • Place items in the stroller pockets or baskets, in a carry-on bag or on the X-ray belt for screening.
  • Equipment that does not fit through the X-ray machine will undergo a visual/physical inspection by TSA officers.

Screening Technology

Walk-Through Metal Detector

Children able to walk through the metal detector without assistance may do so separately from their parent or guardian. If they alarm, children are allowed multiple passes through screening technologies and may undergo other procedures to resolve the alarm to reduce the need for a pat-down.

Infants and small children may be carried through the metal detector. Should the alarm sound, additional screening is required.

Advanced Imaging Technology

If your child is able to remain standing in the required position for 5 seconds, he or she may be screened through the advanced imaging technology. If a child 12 and under goes through the machine and alarms, they have an opportunity to go through again or the TSA officer may use other procedures to resolve the alarm to reduce the need for a pat-down.

You may not be screened by this technology when carrying an infant or child.

Screening your Child

  • Children 12 and under can leave their shoes, light jackets and headwear on during screening. For AIT screening, light jackets must be removed and placed on the X-ray belt.
  • Children will not be separated from their parent/guardian.
  • Remove infants and children from strollers and car seats and carry them in arms through the walk-through metal detector.
  • Infants may be carried in a sling/carrier (to include lap baby) through the walk-through metal detector or when being screened in a wheelchair, but may be subject to additional screening
  • Modified screening procedures are in place to reduce the likelihood of a pat-down.

Can You Bring Baby Formula On A Plane? (Powder vs Liquid TSA Rules)

Last Updated on August 7, 2022

So you want to know how to travel with formula…

How much formula can you take? And how should it be packed when going through the airport security checkpoint?

Let’s find out quickly before your baby needs fed or a nappy needs changed!

TSA Baby Formula Rules

The Transportation Security Administration runs airport security. They decide what you can and can’t take on a plane.

Here’s a screen-grab from their website about flying with formula:

Note the special instructions for bringing baby formula in carry-on luggage.

Here’s the deal. The instructions are a little different for baby formula powder and premixed liquid formula.

Flying With Powered Baby Formula

You can bring powered baby formula on a plane in your carry-on bag or checked bags.

But when packing powdered formula in hand luggage the powders rule applies.

There is no limit to the amount of powdered baby formula you can pack in your carry-on luggage.

But if your powdered can is over 12 oz then remove it from your carry-on bag and place it in a separate tray when going through security so it can undergo additional screening.

It doesn’t matter if your baby’s formula is opened or unopened.

Flying With Liquid Baby Formula Or Water

You can also bring bring premixed liquid formula or water to mix with your powdered formula. The usual 3.4 oz liquids rules does not apply and you don’t need to pack the liquid in your quart sized bag.

The same goes for bringing breast milk in carry-on baggage.

You can also bring formula cooling accessories like ice packs, freezer packs, or frozen gel packs. 

So you can cool formula bottles with an ice pack when traveling. Once you are on the plane you can ask a flight attendant for hot water to get your baby’s meal back up to a temperature they will enjoy.

Your baby does not need to be present when going through security (but it helps). In theory you just need to explain to the TSA officer at the checkpoint that you are bringing the water or liquid formula as a medically necessary liquid for your baby.

When an infant is old enough to walk through security unaided they are no longer considered to be an infant by the TSA and this exception to the usual liquids rules no longer applies.

It’s recommended that you transport any liquid baby formula in a clear translucent bottle to help with the screening process.

Liquids stored in plastic bags or pouches can’t be screened by the bottle liquid scanners so you might be asked to open them.

X-ray machines don’t negatively impact formula or breast milk but if you don’t want the TSA to use them you can ask that they are screened separately the liquid using other methods.

How Much Formula Can You Take On A Plane?

Since medically necessary liquids are exempt from the usual liquids rules there is no limit on how much you can bring.

The same goes for powdered baby formula. There is no limit to how much formula you can take on a plane.

So you won’t have any problems with reasonable quantities in carry on bags.

You airlines carry-on luggage size limits do still apply. So check with your airlines if you are bringing a diaper bag in addition to your carry-on suitcase.

Some low cost airlines don’t permit you to bring two bags into the cabin.

The Verdict

When flying with baby formula or baby food the regular security rules don’t apply.

The TSA is sensible enough to know that parents traveling need to always be able to bottle feed their baby and so baby formula is considered medically necessary.

Quantities greater than 3.4 ounces are permitted for liquid baby formula, and their is no limit on how much powdered baby formula you can bring. You can even bring water for babies too!

Happy flying!

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How to Travel with Formula: Tips and Guidelines

Traveling with a baby can be stressful, especially when it comes to packing and transporting formula. However, with a little preparation and knowledge, it can be a smooth and hassle-free experience.

First, it is important to note that baby formula is allowed in both carry-on and checked bags. However, it is recommended to pack enough formula for the entire trip in case of any delays or unexpected situations. When packing baby formula powder in a carry-on bag, it is important to follow the TSA guidelines and notify the officer right away.

When traveling with formula, it is also important to consider the baby’s feeding schedule. Planning tasks and activities around the baby’s usual feeding times can help avoid any hunger-related meltdowns. It is also a good idea to pack extra bottles, nipples, and cleaning supplies to ensure everything stays sanitary and accessible during the trip.

TSA Guidelines

Preparing formula for travel, storing formula, sterilizing bottles, packing essentials, choosing the right formula for travel, navigating airport security with baby formula, managing feedings on a plane, using formula dispensers for convenience, cleaning bottles after travel, checking formula expiration dates, additional tips for traveling with formula, how much powdered formula can i bring on a plane, can i bring unopened baby formula on a plane, can i bring powdered formula on a plane, can i bring hot water for baby formula on a plane, do airports sell baby formula, what is the best way to travel with baby formula, understanding the basics of traveling with formula.

Traveling with a formula-fed baby can be challenging, but with the right preparation, it can be a stress-free experience. Here are some basics to keep in mind when traveling with formula:

According to TSA guidelines, formula, breast milk, juice, and baby food in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces (100ml) are allowed in carry-on baggage and do not need to fit in a quart-sized bag. You are permitted to bring acceptable amounts of breast milk and baby formula with you on your trip. It is recommended to inform the TSA agent of any formula, baby food items or breast milk in your carry-on baggage during the security screening process.

When packing formula for a flight, it is essential to plan ahead and pack enough for the duration of the trip. It is better to have too much than not enough. A formula dispenser can be a helpful tool for measuring out the correct amount of formula for each feeding. It is important to note that not all formula dispensers are TSA approved, so it is best to check with the airline before packing one in your carry-on.

When traveling with formula, it is crucial to ensure that it is stored properly to prevent spoilage. Powdered formula should be stored in a cool, dry place, while ready-to-feed formula should be kept in a cooler or insulated bag with ice packs. It is also recommended to bring a few extra bottles and nipples in case of spills or unexpected delays.

When traveling with formula, it is important to ensure that bottles are properly sterilized to prevent the spread of germs. One option is to bring sterilized bottles from home, but disposable sterilizing bags can also be a convenient and space-saving option. It is also recommended to bring a sterilizing tablet and ask the crew for water on the flight.

By keeping these basics in mind, traveling with formula can be a smooth and stress-free experience for both parents and babies.

Preparation Before Travel

A mother is packing the luggage - How to Travel with Formula - Baby Journey

Traveling with a bottle-fed baby requires some preparation to ensure that feeding goes smoothly, especially when traveling by air. Here are some tips to help parents prepare for a trip with baby formula.

When packing for a trip with baby formula, parents should consider the following essentials:

  • Formula: Bring enough formula to last the entire trip, plus a little extra in case of delays.
  • Bottles: Pack enough bottles for each feeding, plus a few extra in case of spills or leaks.
  • Water: Bring clean water for mixing formula, or plan to buy bottled water after passing through security.
  • Bottle brush: Pack a bottle brush for cleaning bottles on the go.
  • Burp cloths: Bring a few burp cloths to clean up after feeding.
  • Insulated bag: Use an insulated bag to keep formula and bottles cool.

When choosing a formula for travel, parents should consider the following factors:

  • Powdered formula: Powdered formula is the easiest to travel with because it is lightweight and does not require refrigeration.
  • Ready-to-feed formula: Ready-to-feed formula is convenient but heavy and expensive.
  • Formula dispensers: Formula dispensers are useful for pre-measuring powdered formula for each feeding.
  • Cooling accessories: Cooling accessories, such as freezer packs or gel packs, can keep formula cool while traveling.

Parents should also check with their airline’s policies regarding traveling with baby formula. Most airlines allow a reasonable quantity of baby formula to be brought in carry-on or checked baggage. Formula should be packed in a quart-sized bag and declared at security checkpoints.

By preparing ahead of time and packing the right essentials, parents can ensure that their baby is well-fed during travel.

A little boy dragging his luggage at the airport - How to Travel with Formula - Baby Journey

Traveling with a baby can be stressful, especially when it comes to navigating airport security. However, with a little preparation and knowledge, it can be a smooth and stress-free process.

Formula, breast milk, juice, and baby food in quantities more than 3.4 ounces are permitted in carry-on baggage by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). These items should be removed from the carry-on bag and screened separately from other belongings. At the start of the screening process, parents or guardians should notify the TSA officer that they are carrying formula or other medically essential liquids in excess of 3.4 ounces.

To help speed up the process of going through airport security when traveling with baby formula, here are some tips:

  • Pack formula in see-through bags to make it easier for security officers to inspect.
  • Remove all liquids from the nappy bag before screening.
  • Be aware of prohibited items such as gel packs or ice packs that are not frozen solid. Frozen gel packs or ice packs are allowed in carry-on bags.
  • If traveling with a breast pump, it is allowed in carry-on bags and does not count as a carry-on item.

It is important to note that TSA officers may need to test liquids for explosives or other prohibited substances. If a TSA officer needs to test a liquid, they will ask the passenger to open the container and transfer a small amount of the liquid to a separate screening container.

In summary, traveling with baby formula through airport security can be a smooth process with a little preparation and knowledge of TSA guidelines. Informing the TSA officer at the beginning of the screening process and packing formula in see-through bags can help speed up the process.

Feeding Your Baby During Travel

The baby is drinking milk - How to Travel with Formula - Baby Journey

Traveling with a baby can be challenging, especially when it comes to feeding. However, with proper planning and preparation, feeding your little one during travel can be made easier. Here are some tips to help you manage feedings on a plane and use formula dispensers for convenience.

If you’re flying with a formula-fed baby, you can bring your formula with you. Formula, breast milk, juice, and baby food in quantities more than 3.4 ounces are permitted in carry-on baggage. It is, nevertheless, recommended that you bring additional formula in case of spills or delays.

To warm up bottles, you can ask the flight attendant for hot water or use a portable bottle warmer. It is also helpful to bring wet wipes for cleaning up spills and messes.

If you are breastfeeding, it is recommended to nurse during takeoff and landing to help your baby’s ears adjust to the pressure changes. You can also bring a liquid-filled teether or toddler drinks to help your little one swallow and relieve ear pressure.

Formula dispensers are a convenient way to pack pre-measured formula for travel. They come in various sizes and shapes and can fit easily in a diaper bag or carry-on luggage.

To use a formula dispenser, simply fill each compartment with the appropriate amount of formula needed for each feeding. When it’s time to feed your baby, pour the formula into a bottle of pre-measured water and shake well.

It is important to note that tap water quality can vary from place to place, so it is recommended to use bottled water or boiled tap water when making formula. Frozen gel packs can also be used to keep pre-made bottles cold during travel.

By following these tips and using formula dispensers for convenience, feeding your baby during travel can be made easier and less stressful.

Post-Travel Care and Maintenance

Washed bottles - How to Travel with Formula - Baby Journey

After a trip, it’s essential to take care of the formula and feeding equipment to ensure the baby’s safety and health. Here are some tips for post-travel care and maintenance:

It’s crucial to clean the bottles thoroughly after every use to prevent bacteria growth. Use a bottle brush and mild soap to clean the bottles and nipples. Rinse them with hot water to remove any soap residue.

If you don’t have access to hot water, you can use bottled water or a water bottle with a built-in filter. Be sure to clean the water bottle before using it to rinse the bottles.

After cleaning, sterilize the bottles and nipples by boiling them in water for at least five minutes. You can also use a sterilizer or microwave sterilizer bags for convenience.

Always check the expiration date of the formula before using it. Expired formula can cause digestive problems and make the baby sick.

Check the expiration date on the formula container before packing it for travel. If the formula expires during the trip, dispose of it and buy a new one.

It’s also essential to check the expiration date of any backup formula you bring along. Don’t forget to check the expiration date of the water you use to mix the formula.

In conclusion, taking care of the formula and feeding equipment after travel is crucial for the baby’s health and safety. Clean the bottles thoroughly and check the expiration date of the formula before using it. By following these simple steps, parents can ensure that their baby is getting the best care possible.

Mom and baby on an airplane - How to Travel with Formula - Baby Journey

When traveling with a formula-fed baby or toddler, there are a few additional tips that can make the experience smoother and less stressful. Here are some practical tips for parents:

  • Pack enough formula: It’s always better to pack more formula than you think you’ll need. This is especially important if you’re traveling to a remote location where it may be difficult to find your preferred brand of formula. A good rule of thumb is to pack at least one extra day’s worth of formula, just in case of delays or unexpected situations.
  • Use translucent bottles: When going through airport security, it’s important to use translucent bottles for your formula. This will make it easier for security personnel to screen your formula without having to open the bottles. If you’re using opaque bottles, consider transferring your formula to translucent bottles before your trip.
  • Consider affiliate links: If you’re looking to purchase formula before your trip, consider using affiliate links to save money and time. Many online retailers offer discounts and free shipping for formula purchases, and using affiliate links can help you earn cashback or other rewards.
  • Pack formula in carry-on baggage: When flying with a formula-fed baby, it’s a good idea to pack your formula in your carry-on baggage. This will ensure that you have easy access to your formula during the flight, and will also prevent any potential issues with lost or delayed checked baggage.
  • Be prepared for spills: Accidents happen, especially when traveling with young children. Be sure to pack extra bibs, burp cloths, and wipes to clean up any spills or messes that may occur during your trip.
  • Know the TSA rules: Make sure you are aware with the TSA rules regarding formula and other liquids before your travel. Formula, breast milk, juice, and baby meals weighing more than 3.4 ounces are permitted in carry-on luggage and do not need to fit in a quart-sized bag. You may be forced to submit them for additional screening, though.

By following these additional tips, parents can ensure a smoother and stress-free travel experience with their formula-fed baby or toddler.

Traveling with baby formula can be a daunting task for new parents. However, with the right preparation and knowledge, it can be a smooth and stress-free experience. Here are some key takeaways to keep in mind when traveling with baby formula:

  • Plan ahead: Consider your baby’s feeding schedule and pack enough formula for the duration of your trip. It’s always better to have more than you need than to run out.
  • Pack smart: Use a formula dispenser to keep pre-measured formula organized and easy to access. Bring empty bottles to mix and serve the formula in. Consider packing a few extra items such as a bottle brush and sterilizing tablets for added convenience.
  • Be aware of regulations: Check with your airline or transportation provider to ensure you are following their guidelines for carrying liquids and baby formula. Remember that TSA regulations allow for empty bottles to pass through security.
  • Practice good hygiene: Always wash your hands thoroughly before preparing formula and use clean, sterilized bottles. Consider packing a portable bottle sterilizer or sterilizing tablets for added peace of mind.
  • Be flexible: Traveling with a baby can be unpredictable, so be prepared to adjust your plans as needed. Don’t be afraid to ask for help or take breaks when necessary.

By following these tips, parents can feel confident and prepared when traveling with baby formula. With a little bit of planning and preparation, it’s possible to enjoy a stress-free trip with your little one.

Frequently Asked Questions

According to TSA guidelines, you are allowed to bring a “reasonable amount” of powdered formula on a plane. However, it is recommended that you bring only enough for your trip and pack it in your checked luggage to avoid any issues during security screening.

Yes, you can bring unopened baby formula on a plane in your carry-on or checked luggage. However, it is recommended that you pack it in your checked luggage to avoid any potential issues during security screening.

Yes, you can bring powdered formula on a plane in your carry-on or checked luggage. However, it is recommended that you pack it in your checked luggage to avoid any potential issues during security screening.

You are allowed to bring hot water for baby formula on a plane, but it must be in a thermos or other insulated container and be presented for inspection at the security checkpoint. It is also recommended that you bring extra water in case of delays or other unforeseen circumstances.

Many airports do sell baby formula, but it is not guaranteed. It is recommended that you bring enough formula for your trip to avoid any potential issues.

The best way to travel with baby formula is to pack it in your checked luggage to avoid any potential issues during security screening. It is also recommended that you bring extra formula and water in case of delays or other unforeseen circumstances.

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Mom Van Up

How To Pack Baby Formula On A Road Trip: 11 Hacks

  • Date: July 18, 2022
  • Time to read: 10 min.

Traveling with a baby can require a lot of packing, and with formula there are a few ways to make packing easier and less stressful. 

These 11 tips from seasoned road trip mamas can make the trip a lot easier, cleaner and less stressful.

1. Pack All You’ll Need

Pack enough formula for the whole trip. I know many mamas who have had trouble finding their formula when traveling. 

Try not to switch formulas while away from home it may cause an unexpected allergy or discomfort for your sweet baby. 

If you are traveling for a long time you can call ahead to stores in the area to see if they stock the formula you use or mail some to your destination. 

2. Pre Measure For Travel Days

Use a formula measuring container to pre measure formula for travel days. This can make stops faster and easier. 

Keep everything you need to feed the baby in one bag that is easy to reach . You need to stop about every two hours when you are traveling with a baby, so be ready to get out quickly. 

I like to make this bag brightly colored so I can easily describe it when I ask someone else to grab it. 

You can use a tote if it fits your packing area better, but keep a grab and go bag handy too. 

3. Pack Dish Soap

The most difficult part about traveling with bottles and formula is the washing. Be sure to pack a small bottle of dish soap so you are ready to wash the bottles. 

Any sink will work, but you want a good dish soap to really get the bottles clean. 

Dollar Tree often has very small bottles that are handy for travel. 

4. Choose Drop In Bottle Liners

If you want to avoid as much washing as possible, you may choose to use bottle liners. 

Playtex makes liners that drop into the bottle and hold the formula. This means you will only have to wash nipples! 

These work best when used with liquid formula, so bring another mixing bottle or choose the pre-mixed liquid formulas if they are available in your preferred brand. 

5. Use Kiinde For Picky Babies

If your baby uses only one kind of nipple , you can use a Kiinde feeding system with their preferred nipple. 

Kiinde comes with a variety of adapters that allow you to add any nipple to their pouch. You have to buy the starter set or gift set (linked above) to get the adapters.  

These work best with liquid formula, so grab premixed or mix the formula in another container before filling the pouches. 

So load up the pouch with the formula and add the nipples that your baby is used to and just throw away the pouch when you are done. 

I used these bottles for trips, but my babies hated the nipple. The adapters fix this problem. 

I do see the sets used on marketplace so you could grab the adapters from a set and just buy the Kiinde bottles and pouches !

6. Get A Water Heater Not A Bottle Warmer

Use this water warmer to warm the water , not the whole bottle on the road. I like this because you can use the warm water for so much more than making warm bottles. 

Use it to prepare instant coffee, make cup noodles or tea! 

This water warmer is designed for making bottles and it has a rechargeable battery so it does not need to be plugged in when in use. Charge it at night and you can use it all day to make warm bottles. 

It even suggests you could use it on your night side table to do night feeds, genius. 

7. Pack a Drying Pad

Pack a bottle brush and drying pad with your dish soap so you can clean and dry bottles wherever you are. 

Clear off a shelf or counter to dry your bottles and you have a very good setup for washing bottles. 

If your baby is younger than 6 months consider using a microwavable sterilizer bag to keep the bottles extra clean. 

8. Use Pre-Mixed Formula

Pre-mixed liquid formula is very convenient for a road trip. It is shelf stable and does not require water to prepare. 

Some of the bottles can even be used by screwing a nipple to the top! 

If you are using drop in liners or Kiinde pouches, I recommend the pre-mixed formula. 

9. Send Ahead If Space Is Limited

If you need to pack lightly you can send yourself a package with your formula to your destination. 

Stock up at home, pack the formula into a box and send it to your destination. Call your accommodations ahead to let them know it will be arriving. 

Hikers do this on long hikes to replenish their supplies while on the trail. 

10. Wash Bottles Daily

Be sure to wash bottles each day to avoid bacteria or mold growth. 

Each night take all your dirty bottles and nipples and wash them in warm soapy water and let them air dry. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated advice and bottle washing tips  in the linked post. 

I like to keep my dirty bottles in a ziploc in the cooler to keep them from getting sour and moldy until I can wash them. 

You can also use a microwave sterilizer bag if you want to be extra cautious or if you pediatrician recommends it for your baby. 

11. Pack Water (Or a Filter?)

If you are using powdered formula, don’t forget to pack water. 

You can use bottled water, but I find that we go through it so quickly on a trip, so I like to have a backup filter as well. 

We love the Travel Berkey for when we are at a hotel or staying away from home, but it would be cumbersome in the car. 

Traveling With Formula Mom and Baby Outside

How to Pack Formula

So when you are packing the car, be sure you have enough formula for the trip within arm’s reach. 

I have found a basket under the seat to be very convenient for diapers, bibs, blankets and feeding supplies. 

Measure your day’s  formula and pack it with the water, bottles, warmer and bag for dirty bottles in a basket that you can reach easily.  

There are a few ways you may want to pack the actual formula. 

Pre measure

Premeasure enough formula for the day into a travel container. This is probably how you prep for any outing with your little one, so you probably already have everything you need for this. 

This will make it faster to get the bottles ready, if you use warm water, warm it in a travel warmer before mixing the formula. 

Use Premixed

If at all possible, use premixed so that you don’t have to worry about water. If you are traveling with a cooler, you can store any opened bottles in there between feeding. 

If the formula you use is not available as a liquid, do not try a new formula while you are away from home. It could result in allergy, gas or constipation. Not worth it. 

Buy smaller bottles so that you will not have to store the opened containers for very long. They are generally available in 4oz, 8oz and quart size bottles. 

If your baby prefers warmed bottles use a travel bottle warmer. 

The unopened bottles do not need to be refrigerated and can be stored at room temperature. 

If you cannot get mixed, be sure to do the math on how much water you will need. My family goes through so much water when we are traveling! We are not used to having to carry all our water with us and it shows. 

You can usually buy water if you run out, but try to keep a special stash of bottle water and replenish it for the trip home. 

How Much Formula To Pack

The best way to know how much formula you will need is to keep a record at home. Use an app or a simple notebook to track how much formula your baby is eating each day. 

This can give you a good idea of how much formula you will need to pack. 

You can also use this chart to give you a good estimate. 

Chart adapted from What To Expect 

Use this chart as a guide, but be sure to talk to your pediatrician about how much your baby is eating as they know YOUR baby and their specific needs. 

It is possible that your baby will eat less on the road trip. All my kids have eaten less, and slept more on long trips. 

If your baby starts eating less just be sure to monitor your baby for signs of dehydration and try to stick to a normal feeding routine as much as possible. 

How to Clean Bottles on the Road

The biggest challenge when traveling with bottles is getting them clean. 

I have a few ideas to get around this problem and a system for using what you have. 

Create Fewer Dishes

One way to deal with dishes is to eliminate as many as possible. There are a few ways you can do this while traveling. 

Be sure to use formula safety guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics and don’t mix it too far ahead and don’t water it down. 

The first time I traveled with bottles I had been given a Kiinde system . My baby did not like the nipple on the original system, but now there is a very affordable bottle kit that allows any nipple type to be used. 

A Kiinde system allows you to pour milk or formula into the pouch, screw the pouch or bag into the bottle and discard the pouch when the feeding is done. 

With this system you would only have nipples to wash. 

Drop In System

Playtex has the drop in bottle inserts that accomplish the same thing. These disposable drop in bottle liners allow you to put the formula into the bag and discard it when the feeding is done. 

Again, with this system you would only have nipples to clean.  

Pre-Mixed Formula

The easiest way to use formula on the go is to use pre pre-mixed formula. These are shelf stable, do not need to be refrigerated until open and do not require you to find water. 

Pre-mixed formula can be purchased in quarts or smaller 4 or 8 ounce bottles. 

Use pre-mixed formula with the Kiinde system or Playtex Drop ins and you will have a very simple formula solution. 

The smaller bottles may allow you to screw the nipple directly to the bottle. Very convenient when traveling. 

So you will just be washing nipples. 

Washing Bottles on a Long Trip

You will need to wash the feeding supplies at least once a day . You can wash them whenever you have a sink available, if you need to sterilize bottles get a microwave sterilization kit to use at a hotel. 

After feeding your baby put the dirty bottles and nipples in a bag or container to store for washing. I like to use a large ziploc and put the dirty stuff in the cooler to keep it from growing mold.  

Whenever you have a sink available, wash the bottles with warm soapy water and air dry them on a clean surface. 

If you would like to you can use microwave sanitizing bags as an extra step to ensure very clean bottles. 

It may be uncomfortable to wash bottles in small sinks, and you can avoid this by using a pouch or liner system, then you will only have to wash nipples and rings. 

11 Hacks for Traveling with Formula

Flying with Formula

We travel by car most of the time, but flying with a formula is very similar. 

The biggest difference between driving and flying with formula is your packing space. When you fly you will need to pack a bit smarter. 

Formula is considered a medical necessity and TSA should be no problem getting through security with your formula.  

In your baby bag you should carry enough bottles for the whole travel day. Pack a large ziploc to keep any dirty items until you arrive. Pack a small amount of soap as well so you can wash things if the need arrises. 

Solid dish soap bars can be easier to carry when you are flying. 

Pack a microwave sterilizer bag and book hotels that provide a microwave and minifridge. 

If your little one is used to warmed bottles, consider how you plan to warm bottles en route or give room temperature bottles a try. 

There are some great rechargeable bottle warmers that can easily be used while traveling. 

You could try to simplify by offering room temperature bottles and see how your baby reacts.

If you find you must warm bottles you may be able to ask for hot water and warm bottles on your flight by placing them in a cup of hot water. 

There are also portable water warmers (affiliate link) available that are a bit more versatile than bottle warmers. I find this a really helpful gadget as you can use it to heat water for instant coffee, mixing formula or making ramen in the car. 

Be sure to pack enough formula to feed your baby for the whole trip and have a plan for washing your bottles and nipples. Pack dish soap and a bottle brush or choose a disposable bottle liner kit. A microwave sterilization bag is a great way to keep everything very clean for young babies. 

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What to Know About Traveling with Infant Formula

Read time: 4 minutes

What should I know about preparing and storing formula while on-the-go?

How to safely travel with formula for short and long trips by car

What to know about bringing formula to a daycare setting

Learn the ins and outs of traveling by airplane with formula

As you feel more comfortable bringing your little one out into the world, being prepared for feedings is likely top of mind. How much formula should you leave with daycare or a babysitter? If you are traveling, what are the rules for bringing formula on planes?

Read on to learn more about formula preparation and storage when leaving home with your baby.

How do I manage formula feeding when I am out of the house with my baby?

Whether it’s running to the grocery store or going to Grandma’s, the next feeding seems to be just around the corner.

For short trips: Prepare bottles and keep in a cooler bag with ice packs

If it’s a short trip, pack your prepared formula in a cooler or insulated bag with lots of ice packs. This can be done with prepared powdered, concentrate, or ready-to-feed formulas.

Prepared formula can be stored within a cooler bag with ice packs for as long as the temperature inside remains cold enough. Usually this is no longer than 2 hours. 1 , 2

For longer trips: Bring infant formula and water separately

If you will be traveling for longer than 2 hours, consider bringing water and formula powder or concentrate separately and preparing feeds as you need them. This will help keep the formula safe for your baby. 1

Many parents purchase formula dispensers with sections that you can pre-measure the correct number of scoops needed per bottle. If you don’t have access to a formula dispenser, feel free to use any container that is clean and sanitized.

For convenience, pre-measure the formula or concentrate you need. Pair this with a few bottles of pre-measured water, and you are ready for your outing.

We know bringing your little one out and about can be intimidating; chat now for free with one of our Happy Experts, who are registered dietitian nutritionists and infant feeding experts. They’re here to help on our live chat from Monday - Friday 8am-6pm (ET). Chat Now !

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How should i send formula to daycare or with a sitter.

Whether you are going back to work or want a night out, you may be wondering how much formula to leave and in what form.

How to prepare formula for the nanny or babysitter

If it’s a nanny, babysitter, or family member, they may be willing to just be given some sanitized bottles, a container of formula, and preparation instructions - and they are good to go. You can also pre-make all the bottles your little one may need ahead of time and refrigerate them until needed. Prepared infant formula can be kept refrigerated for up to 24 hours. 3

Read more: Everything You Need to Know About How to Prepare and Store Infant Formula

How to send in formula to daycare

Some daycare facilities provide an iron-fortified infant formula, but many have you provide your own. 4 If you will be bringing your own, ask the daycare if they prefer formula already prepared or if they are willing to mix it. Some daycare facilities require parents to pre-mix all formula bottles.

To help your daycare maintain order and safety, label all the bottles with your baby’s name and the date the formula was prepared. 4 Note that many daycares will not give formula to your baby that was brought in the day before.

As long as it’s a short trip (an hour or less) to daycare, and the bottles will be put straight into the fridge once at the facility, the prepared formula bottles will be safe without an insulated bag and ice pack. 3

Chat with your daycare ahead of time so you are aware of all their policies and procedures.

Read more: Formula Preparation: What Type of Water Should I Use?

How much formula does my baby need while I’m away?

To know how much formula to send into daycare or leave with the babysitter, take note of how much formula your baby drinks in the time period they will be away from you. Pack that amount, and perhaps a bit more in the case of extra hunger or spills.

Read more: How Much Formula Does My Baby Need?

How do I travel by airplane with infant formula?

If traveling by air, a “reasonable” amount of prepared formula is allowed through security, per the TSA website .

Here are the steps you will be asked to follow if bringing infant formula on the plane:

Remove the formula items from your carry on to be screened separately

Let the TSA officer know that you have formula in larger amounts than 3.4 ounces

The TSA may need to test the formula for prohibited items (by pouring a very small amount out). If you do not want the formula bottle to be opened, let the TSA know and additional screening procedures may be needed.

You are allowed to bring ice packs or frozen gel packs, and a cooler or insulated bag. The ice packs may need additional screening if they are partially frozen or slushy. 5

Plan ahead by locating stores at your destination that carry your brand of formula, just in case.

Bottom Line

Organizing plane travel or even just leaving home for a bit with your little one can be stressful, but with a bit of preparation you’ll be able to meet baby’s feeding needs with ease.

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For more on this topic, check out the following articles:

Should I Formula Feed On Demand or on a Schedule?

Should I Switch Baby Formulas?

Does Your Baby Need a Sensitive Formula?

What is Paced Bottle Feeding?

Introducing Formula to a Breastfed Baby

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Travel On The Fly

Can I bring baby formula on a plane? (TSA’s Rules)

So you’re packing up for your next trip. But you need to get clear on what you can and can’t bring on the plane first.

You might be wondering: can I bring baby formula on a plane?

Yes, you can bring baby formula on a plane. Baby formula is one of a few liquids that does not need to follow the TSA’s 3-1-1 rule. You are allowed to bring more than 3.4 ounces of baby formula on a plane and it does not need to fit in one-quart sized bag. Also, you can bring baby formula in your carry-on even if your child is not on the plane with you.

Can I bring baby formula on a plane? (TSA Rules)

There is no strict limit to how much baby formula you can bring on a plane. But the TSA says you can bring baby formula “in reasonable quantities.”

Here is a great baby formula on Amazon that you might like for your trip.

Table of Contents

How to Pack Baby Formula in Carry-On

When you go through airport security, you need to remove your baby formula for a separate screening. It’s best to pack it in a separate quart-sized bag to make screening quick and easy. But this is not required for baby formula.

Sometimes, items can obstruct the x-ray machine making it difficult for TSA agents to screen your luggage. So it’s best to pack your baby formula separately to minimize delays at the security checkpoint.

How many 3.4 oz containers can you bring on a plane?

You can bring between six and eight 3.4 ounce containers on a plane. Six to eight containers are approximately how many you can fit into one quart-size bag.

Can I bring baby formula in checked baggage?

Yes, you can bring baby formula in unlimited quantities in checked baggage.

Keep in mind that each airline has weight restrictions for luggage. Liquids are quite heavy, so the weight of your luggage can add up quickly. When flying with baby formula in your carry-on, it does not have to fit in one quart-sized bag.

How to Pack Baby Formula in Checked Baggage

When packing baby formula in checked baggage, make sure it is closed tightly and secured to prevent spills in transit. Weigh your luggage before going to the airport to ensure it’s within the weight limit of your specific airline. Otherwise you may have additional fees to pay when you go to check in.

How much baby formula can you take on a plane in checked baggage?

Baby formula does not have restrictions in your checked or carry-on baggage. But you should double check the TSA’s website to review their regulations.

Certain toiletries, like spray deodorant, have limits established by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Read more about traveling with spray deodorant in this article .

Can you bring baby formula powder on a plane?

Yes, baby formula powder is allowed in quantities over 3.4 ounces or 100 mL. Powder and liquid are both allowed in carry-on and checked baggage. You do not have to pack baby formula in a quart-sized bag but it should be screened separately from other items.

Is baby formula considered a liquid by the TSA?

Yes, baby formula is a liquid. But it is not subject to the 3-1-1 rule since baby formula is a necessity for many parents.

What is the TSA’s 3-1-1 rule?

The 3-1-1 liquids rule is a rule implemented by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) that regulates how much liquid you can bring on a plane. This rule states that you can bring up to 3.4 ounces or 100 mL of liquid on a plane. All of your liquids must be in separate containers of 3.4 ounces or less. And they must fit in one quart-size bag. 3.4 ounces, 100 mL, one quart-size bag. Hence, 3-1-1.

The 3-1-1 liquids rule can be misleading because not all the items that follow this rule are technically liquids. It also applies to gels, aerosols, creams, and anything in between. Here’s what @AskTSA has to say about the rule.

Ask TSA Question

You won’t be able to bring more liquid than whatever will fit in the quart-size bag.

TSA Liquid Rule Exceptions

For some liquids, the TSA makes exceptions to the 3-1-1 rule. You can bring more than 100 mL of the following liquids. 

  • Baby formula
  • Breast milk
  • Juice or water for babies
  • Medically necessary liquids, prescription liquids, and gels

To make screening smooth, let the TSA agent know how much of these liquids you are bringing.

Read Also: Can I Bring Creatine On A Plane?

Frequently Asked Questions

Why can’t you take more than 100ml on a plane.

The 3-1-1 liquids rule was implemented in response to a 2006 liquid bomb plot. It was thwarted by British police two weeks before the intended attack.

For airlines, it’s difficult to discern if liquids are a threat to passengers. Limiting liquids was a security measure in response to this plot to make screening easier.

How strict is the TSA on liquids?

The TSA is incredibly strict on liquids. They are committed to ensuring all passengers are safe and there are no liquid explosives in carry-ons. Do not try and get around the 3-1-1 liquids rule. It will just create more trouble for you as you’ll have to throw out any containers larger than 3.4 ounces. To make screening quick and easy, put your liquids in a separate bin.

Related: How would you describe your English level?

Does the TSA allow frozen liquids?

Yes, completely frozen liquids are considered solid and therefore have no restrictions. The liquid must be completely frozen and not slushy. Otherwise, it’ll be subject to the 3-1-1 rule.

What does the TSA do with confiscated items?

The TSA typically sends confiscated items to state agencies where they are distributed and resold. The TSA does not profit from the selling of these items. Some items are donated to non-profit organizations or recycled. TSA employees are prohibited from stealing confiscated items for personal use.

If you bring prohibited items through security, here are a few options aside from giving your items to the TSA.

  • Pass the item to a friend who’s not traveling.
  • Transfer the item to your checked baggage.
  • Throw away the item.
  • If it’s a liquid, dump it out and carry the empty container or bottle.

Recap and My Recommendations

You can bring baby formula on a plane. Just make sure that you follow the TSA’s rules and regulations. The TSA wasn’t specific, but they say you can bring baby formula in “reasonable quantities.” Use your judgment there and avoid bringing too much to make screening quick and easy.

Keep in mind that baby formula may be subject to additional screening at the security checkpoint. You can take it in your checked baggage to avoid that hassle.

Thanks for reading! Check out more ‘can I bring’ articles below to help you pack for your trip. Have fun!

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  • Section 7 - Travel & Breastfeeding
  • Section 7 - Vaccine Recommendations for Infants & Children

Traveling Safely with Infants & Children

Cdc yellow book 2024.

Author(s): Michelle Weinberg, Nicholas Weinberg, Susan Maloney

Children increasingly are traveling and living outside their home countries. Although data about the incidence of pediatric illnesses associated with international travel are limited, the risks that children face when traveling are likely similar to those faced by their adult travel companions.

Compared with adults, however, children are less likely to receive pretravel advice. In a review of children with posttravel illnesses seen at clinics in the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network, 51% of all children and 32% of children visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) had received pretravel medical advice, compared with 59% of adults. The most commonly reported health problems among child travelers are dermatologic conditions, including animal and arthropod bites, cutaneous larva migrans, and sunburn; diarrheal illnesses; respiratory disorders; and systemic febrile illnesses, especially malaria.

Motor vehicle and water-related injuries, including drowning, are other major health and safety concerns for child travelers. See Box 7-03 for recommendations on assessing and preparing children for planned international travel.

Box 7-03 Assessing & preparing children for international travel: a checklist for health care providers

☐ Review travel-related and routine childhood vaccinations. The pretravel visit is an opportunity to ensure that children are up to date on their routine vaccinations.

☐ Assess all anticipated travel-related activities.

☐ Provide preventive counseling and interventions tailored to specific risks, including special travel preparations and any treatment required for infants and children with underlying health conditions, chronic diseases, or immunocompromising conditions.

☐ For children who require medications to manage chronic health conditions, caregivers should carry a supply sufficient for the trip duration.

☐ For adolescents traveling in a student group or program (see also Sec. 9, Ch. 8, Study Abroad & Other International Student Travel ), consider providing counseling on the following:

  • Disease prevention
  • Drug and alcohol use
  • Empiric treatment and management of common travel-related illnesses
  • Risks of sexually transmitted infections and sexual assault

☐ Give special consideration to travelers visiting friends and relatives in low- and middle-income countries and assess risks for malaria, intestinal parasites, and tuberculosis.

☐ Consider advising adults traveling with children and older children to take a course in basic first aid before travel.

☐ For coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) safety measures for children—including mask use, testing, and vaccination—see Sec. 5, Part 2, Ch. 3, COVID-19 .

Travel-Associated Infections & Diseases

Arboviral infections.

Pediatric VFR travelers with frequent or prolonged travel to areas where arboviruses (e.g., chikungunya, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, and Zika viruses) are endemic or epidemic could be at increased risk for infection. Children traveling to areas with arboviruses should use the same mosquito protection measures described elsewhere in this chapter (also see Sec. 4, Ch. 6, Mosquitoes, Ticks & Other Arthropods ). Unlike mosquitoes that transmit malaria, the Aedes mosquitoes that transmit chikungunya, dengue, yellow fever, and Zika are aggressive daytime biters; they also bite at night, especially in areas with artificial light. Consider dengue or other arboviral infections in children with fever if they recently returned from travel in endemic areas. Vaccination against dengue, tick-borne encephalitis, and yellow fever could be indicated for some children (see Sec. 7, Ch. 4, Vaccine Recommendations for Infants & Children , for details).

Diarrhea & Vomiting

Diarrhea and associated gastrointestinal illnesses are among the most common travel-related problems affecting children. Infants and children with diarrhea can become dehydrated more quickly than adults. The etiology of travelers’ diarrhea (TD) in children is similar to that in adults (see Sec. 2, Ch. 6, Travelers’ Diarrhea ).

Adults traveling with children should ensure the children follow safe food and water precautions and frequently wash their hands to prevent foodborne and waterborne illness. For infants, breastfeeding is the best way to reduce the risk for foodborne and waterborne illness (see Sec. 7, Ch. 2, Travel & Breastfeeding ). Infant formulas available abroad might not have the same nutritional composition or be held to the same manufacturing safety standards as in the traveler’s home country; parents feeding their child formula should consider whether they need to bring formula from home. If the infant is fed with formula, travelers should consider using liquid formula, which is sterile. Use of powdered infant formula has been associated with Cronobacter infection; infants <3 months old, infants born prematurely, and infants with weakened immune systems are at greatest risk. Parents should take extra precautions for preparing powdered infant formula .

Travelers should disinfect water served to young children, including water used to prepare infant formula (see Sec. 2, Ch. 8, Food & Water Precautions , and Sec. 2, Ch. 9, Water Disinfection , for details on safety practices). In some parts of the world, bottled water could be contaminated and should be disinfected to kill bacteria, viruses, and protozoa before consumption.

Similarly, travelers with children should diligently follow food precautions and ensure foods served to children are cooked thoroughly and eaten while still hot; caregivers should peel fruits typically eaten raw immediately before consumption. Additionally, adults should use caution with fresh dairy products, which might not be pasteurized or might be diluted with untreated water. For short trips, parents might want to bring a supply of safe snacks from home for times when children are hungry and available food might not be appealing or safe (see Sec. 2, Ch. 8, Food & Water Precautions , for more information).

Adult travelers with children should pay scrupulous attention that potable water is used for handwashing and cleaning bottles, pacifiers, teething rings, and toys that fall to the floor or are handled by others. After diaper changes, especially for infants with diarrhea, parents should be particularly careful to wash hands well to avoid spreading infection to themselves and other family members. When proper handwashing facilities are not available, hand sanitizer containing ≥60% alcohol can be used as a disinfecting agent. Because alcohol-based hand sanitizers are not effective against certain pathogens, however, adults and children should wash hands with soap and water as soon as possible. In addition, alcohol does not remove organic material, and people should wash visibly soiled hands with soap and water.

Chemoprophylaxis with antibiotics is not generally used in children; typhoid vaccine might be indicated, however (see Sec. 5, Part 1, Ch. 24, Typhoid & Paratyphoid Fever ).

Antibiotics

Azithromycin.

Few data are available regarding empiric treatment of TD in children. Antimicrobial options for empiric treatment of TD in children are limited. In practice, when an antibiotic is indicated for moderate to severe diarrhea, some clinicians prescribe azithromycin as a single daily dose (10 mg/kg) for 3 days. Clinicians can prescribe unreconstituted azithromycin powder before travel, with instructions from the pharmacist for mixing it into an oral suspension prior to administration. Although resistance breakpoints have not yet been determined, elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations for azithromycin have been reported for some gastrointestinal pathogens. Therefore, counsel parents to seek medical attention for their children if they do not improve after empiric treatment. Before prescribing azithromycin for empiric TD treatment, review possible contraindications and the risks for adverse reactions (e.g., QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmias).

Fluoroquinolones

Although fluoroquinolones frequently are used for empiric TD treatment in adults, these medications are not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this purpose in children aged <18 years because of cartilage damage seen in animal studies. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) suggests that fluoroquinolones be considered for treatment of children with severe infections caused by multidrug-resistant strains of Campylobacter jejuni , Salmonella species, Shigella species, or Vibrio cholerae .

Fluoroquinolone resistance in gastrointestinal organisms has been reported from some countries, particularly in Asia. In addition, use of fluoroquinolones has been associated with tendinopathies, development of Clostridioides difficile infection, and central nervous system side effects including confusion and hallucinations. Routine use of fluoroquinolones for prophylaxis or empiric treatment for TD among children is not recommended.

Rifaximin is approved for use in children aged ≥12 years but has limited use for empiric treatment since it is only approved to treat noninvasive strains of Escherichia coli . Children with bloody diarrhea should receive medical attention, because antibiotic treatment of enterohemorrhagic E. coli , a cause of bloody diarrhea, has been associated with increased risk for hemolytic uremic syndrome (see Sec. 5, Part 1, Ch. 7, Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli ).

Antiemetics & Antimotility Drugs

Antiemetics generally are not recommended for self- or family-administered treatment of children with vomiting and TD. Because of the association between salicylates and Reye syndrome, bismuth subsalicylate (BSS), the active ingredient in both Pepto-Bismol and Kaopectate, is not generally recommended to treat diarrhea in children <12 years old. In certain circumstances, however, some clinicians use it off-label, with caution. Care should be taken if administering BSS to children with viral infections (e.g., influenza, varicella), because of the risk for Reye syndrome. BSS is not recommended for children aged <3 years.

Use of antiemetics for children with acute gastroenteritis is controversial; some clinical practice guidelines include the use of antiemetics, others do not. A Cochrane Collaboration Review of the use of antiemetics for reducing vomiting related to acute gastroenteritis in children and adolescents showed some benefits with dimenhydrinate, metoclopramide, or ondansetron. Guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America suggest that an antinausea and antiemetic medication (e.g., ondansetron) can facilitate tolerance of oral rehydration in children >4 years of age, and in adolescents with acute gastroenteritis.

A recent systematic review and network meta-analysis comparing several antiemetics in acute gastroenteritis in children showed that ondansetron was the best intervention to reduce vomiting and prevent hospitalization and the need for intravenous rehydration. Routine use of these medications as part of self-treatment for emesis associated with TD in children has not yet been studied, however, and is not generally recommended.

Antimotility drugs (e.g., the opioid receptor agonists loperamide and diphenoxylate), generally should not be given to children <18 years of age with acute diarrhea. Loperamide is particularly contraindicated for children aged <2 years because of the risks for respiratory depression and serious cardiac events. Diphenoxylate and atropine combination tablets should not be used for children aged <2 years, and should be used judiciously in older children because of potential side effects (see Sec. 2, Ch. 6, Travelers’ Diarrhea ).

Fluid & Nutrition Management

The biggest threat to an infant with diarrhea and vomiting is dehydration. Fever or increased ambient temperature increases fluid loss and accelerates dehydration. Advise adults traveling with children about the signs and symptoms of dehydration and the proper use of oral rehydration solution (ORS). Advise adults traveling with children to seek medical attention for an infant or young child with diarrhea who has signs of moderate to severe dehydration, bloody diarrhea, body temperature >101.3°F (38.5°C), or persistent vomiting (unable to maintain oral hydration). Adequate hydration is the mainstay of TD management.

Oral Rehydration Solution: Use & Availability

Counsel parents that dehydration is best prevented and treated by ORS in addition to the infant’s usual food. While seeking medical attention, caregivers should provide ORS to infants by bottle, cup, oral syringe (often available in pharmacies), or spoon. Low-osmolarity ORS is the most effective agent in preventing dehydration, although other formulations are available and can be used if they are more palatable to young children. Homemade sugar-salt solutions are not recommended.

Sports drinks are designed to replace water and electrolytes lost through sweat, and do not contain the same proportions of electrolytes as the solution recommended by the World Health Organization for rehydration during diarrheal illness. Drinks with a high sugar content (e.g., juice, soft drinks) can worsen diarrhea. If ORS is not readily available, however, offer children whatever safe liquid they will take until ORS is obtained. Breastfed infants should continue to breastfeed (for more details, see Sec. 7, Ch. 2, Travel & Breastfeeding ).

ORS can be made from prepackaged glucose and electrolytes packets available at stores or pharmacies in almost all countries. Some pharmacies and stores that specialize in outdoor recreation and camping supplies also sell ORS packets.

ORS is prepared by adding 1 packet to boiled or treated water (see Sec. 2, Ch. 9, Water Disinfection ). Advise travelers to check packet instructions carefully to ensure that the contents are added to the correct volume of water. Once prepared, ORS should be consumed or discarded within 12 hours if held at room temperature, or within 24 hours if kept refrigerated. A dehydrated child will usually drink ORS avidly and should continue to receive ORS if dehydration persists.

As dehydration lessens, the child might refuse the salty-tasting ORS, and adults can offer other safe liquids. An infant or child who has been vomiting will usually keep ORS down if it is offered by spoon or oral syringe in small sips; adults should offer these small sips frequently, however, so the child can receive an adequate volume of ORS. Older children will often drink well by sipping through a straw. Severely dehydrated children often will be unable to drink adequately. Severe dehydration is a medical emergency that usually requires administration of fluids by intravenous or intraosseous routes.

In general, children weighing <22 lb (10 kg) who have mild to moderate dehydration should be administered 2–4 oz (60–120 mL) of ORS for each diarrheal stool or vomiting episode. Children who weigh ≥22 lb (10 kg) should receive 4–8 oz (120–240 mL) of ORS for each diarrheal stool or vomiting episode. AAP provides detailed guidance on rehydration for vomiting and diarrhea.

Diet Modification

Breastfed infants should continue nursing on demand. Formula-fed infants should continue their usual formula during rehydration and should receive a volume sufficient to satisfy energy and nutrient requirements. Lactose-free or lactose-reduced formulas usually are unnecessary. Diluting formula can slow resolution of diarrhea and is not recommended.

Older infants and children receiving semisolid or solid foods should continue to receive their usual diet during the illness. Recommended foods include cereals, fruits and vegetables, starches, and pasteurized yogurt. Travelers should avoid giving children food high in simple sugars (e.g., undiluted apple juice, presweetened cereals, gelatins, soft drinks) because these can exacerbate diarrhea by osmotic effects. In addition, foods high in fat tend to delay gastric emptying, and thus might not be well tolerated by ill children.

Travelers should not withhold food for ≥24 hours. Early feeding can decrease changes in intestinal permeability caused by infection, reduce illness duration, and improve nutritional outcome. Although highly specific diets (e.g., the BRAT [bananas, rice, applesauce, toast] diet) or juice-based and clear fluid diets commonly are recommended, such severely restrictive diets have no scientific basis and should be avoided.

Malaria is among the most serious and life-threatening infections acquired by pediatric international travelers. Pediatric VFR travelers are at particularly high risk for malaria infection if they do not receive prophylaxis. Among people reported with malaria in the United States in 2017, 17% were children <18 years old; 89% had traveled to Africa. Seventy percent of the children who were US residents also were VFR travelers, and 61% did not take malaria chemoprophylaxis.

Children with malaria can rapidly develop high levels of parasitemia and are at increased risk for severe complications of malaria, including seizures, coma, and death. Initial symptoms can mimic many other common causes of pediatric febrile illness, which could delay diagnosis and treatment. Among 33 children with imported malaria diagnosed at 11 medical centers in New York City, 11 (32%) had severe malaria and 14 (43%) were initially misdiagnosed. Counsel adults traveling with children to malaria-endemic areas to use preventive measures, be aware of the signs and symptoms of malaria, and seek prompt medical attention if symptoms develop.

Antimalarial Drugs

Pediatric doses for malaria prophylaxis are provided in Table 5-27 . Calculate dosing based on body weight. Medications used for infants and young children are the same as those recommended for adults, except atovaquone-proguanil, which should not be used for prophylaxis in children weighing <5 kg because of lack of data on safety and efficacy. Doxycycline should not be recommended for malaria prophylaxis for children aged <8 years. Although doxycycline has not been associated with dental staining when given as a routine treatment for some infections, other tetracyclines might cause teeth staining.

Atovaquone-proguanil, chloroquine, and mefloquine have a bitter taste. Mixing pulverized tablets in a small amount of food or drink can facilitate the administration of antimalarial drugs to infants and children. Clinicians also can ask compounding pharmacists to pulverize tablets and prepare gelatin capsules with calculated pediatric doses. A compounding pharmacy can alter the flavoring of malaria medication tablets so that children are more willing to take them. The Find a Compounder section on the Alliance for Pharmacy Compounding website (281-933-8400) can help with finding a compounding pharmacy. Because overdose of antimalarial drugs, particularly chloroquine, can be fatal, store medication in childproof containers and keep out of the reach of infants and children.

Personal Protective Measures & Repellent Use

Children should sleep in rooms with air conditioning or screened windows, or sleep under mosquito nets when air conditioning or screens are not available. Mosquito netting should be used over infant carriers. Children can reduce skin exposed to mosquitoes by wearing long pants and long sleeves while outdoors. Clothing and mosquito nets can be treated with an insect repellent/insecticide (e.g., permethrin) that repels and kills ticks, mosquitoes, and other arthropods. Permethrin remains effective through multiple washings. Clothing and mosquito nets should be retreated according to the product label. Permethrin should not be applied to the skin.

Although permethrin provides a longer duration of protection, recommended repellents that can be applied to skin also can be used on clothing and mosquito nets (see Sec. 4, Ch. 6, Mosquitoes, Ticks & Other Arthropods , for more details about these protective measures). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)–registered repellents containing one of the following active ingredients: DEET ( N,N -diethyl- m -toluamide); picaridin; oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE); PMD (para-menthane-3,8-diol); IR3535; or 2-undecanone (methyl nonyl ketone). Repellent products must state any age restriction; if no age restriction is provided, EPA has not required a restriction on the use of the product. Most EPA-registered repellents can be used on children aged >2 months, except products containing OLE or PMD that specify they should not be used on children aged <3 years. Insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, or 2-undecanone can be used on children without age restriction.

Many repellents contain DEET as the active ingredient. DEET concentration varies considerably between products. The duration of protection varies with DEET concentration; higher concentrations protect longer; products with DEET concentration >50% do not, however, offer a marked increase in protection time.

The EPA has approved DEET for use on children without an age restriction. If used appropriately, DEET does not represent a health problem. The AAP states that the use of products with the lowest effective DEET concentrations (i.e., 20%–30%) seems most prudent for infants and young children, on whom it should be applied sparingly. For more tips on protecting babies and children from mosquito bites , see  Box 7-04 .

Combination products containing repellents and sunscreen are generally not recommended because instructions for use are different, and sunscreen might need to be reapplied more often and in larger amounts than repellent. In general, apply sunscreen first, and then apply repellent. Mosquito coils should be used with caution in the presence of children to avoid burns and inadvertent ingestion. For detailed information about repellent use and other protective measures, see Sec. 4, Ch. 6, Mosquitoes, Ticks & Other Arthropods .

Box 7-04 Protecting infants & children from mosquito bites: recommendations for travelers

Dress children in clothing that covers arms and legs.

Cover strollers and baby carriers with mosquito netting.

Properly use insect repellent

  • Always follow all label instructions.
  • In general, do not use products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD) on children <3 years old.
  • Do not apply insect repellent to a child’s hands, eyes, mouth, cuts, or irritated skin.
  • Adults should spray insect repellent onto their hands and then apply to a child’s face.

Depending on travel destination and activities, animal exposures and bites might be a health risk for pediatric travelers. Worldwide, rabies is more common in children than adults. In addition to the potential for increased contact with animals, children also are more likely to be bitten on the head or neck, leading to more severe injuries. Counsel children and their families to avoid all stray or unfamiliar animals and to inform adults of any animal contact or bites. Bats throughout the world have the potential to transmit rabies virus.

Travelers should clean all bite and scratch wounds as soon as possible after the event occurs by using soap and water, or povidine iodine if available, for ≥20 minutes to prevent infections, (e.g., rabies). Wounds contaminated with necrotic tissue, dirt, or other foreign materials should be cleaned and debrided promptly by health care professionals, where possible. A course of antibiotics might be appropriate after animal bites or scratches, because these can lead to local or systemic infections. For mammal bites and scratches, children should be evaluated promptly to assess their need for rabies postexposure prophylaxis (see Sec. 4, Ch. 7, Zoonotic Exposures: Bites, Stings, Scratches & Other Hazards ; and Sec. 5, Part 2, Ch. 18, Rabies ).

Because rabies vaccine and rabies immune globulin might not be available in certain destinations, encourage families traveling to areas with high risk for rabies exposure to seriously consider preexposure rabies vaccination and to purchase medical evacuation insurance, depending on their destination and planned travel activities (see Sec. 7, Ch. 4, Vaccine Recommendations for Infants & Children , and Sec. 6, Ch. 1, Travel Insurance, Travel Health Insurance & Medical Evacuation Insurance ).

Soil & Water Contact: Infections & Infestations

Children are more likely than adults to have contact with soil or sand, and therefore could be exposed to diseases caused by infectious stages of parasites in soil, including ascariasis, hookworm, cutaneous or visceral larva migrans, strongyloidiasis, and trichuriasis. Children and infants should wear protective footwear and play on a sheet or towel rather than directly on the ground. Clothing should not be dried on the ground. In countries with a tropical climate, clothing or diapers dried in the open air should be ironed before use to prevent infestation with fly larvae.

Schistosomiasis is a risk to children and adults in endemic areas. While in schistosomiasis- endemic areas (see Sec. 5, Part 3, Ch. 20, Schistosomiasis ), children should not bathe, swim, or wade in fresh, unchlorinated water (e.g., lakes, ponds).

Noninfectious Hazards & Risks

Although air travel is safe for most newborns, infants, and children, people traveling with children should consider a few issues before departure. Children with chronic heart or lung problems might be at risk for hypoxia during flight, and caregivers should consult a clinician before travel.

Ear pain can be troublesome for infants and children during descent. Pressure in the middle ear can be equalized by swallowing or chewing; thus, infants should nurse or suck on a bottle, and older children can try chewing gum. Antihistamines and decongestants have not been shown to be of benefit. No evidence suggests that air travel exacerbates the symptoms or complications associated with otitis media.

Travel to different time zones, jet lag, and schedule disruptions can disturb sleep patterns in infants and children, just as in adults (Sec. 8, Ch. 4, Jet Lag ).

Safety Restraints

Travelers also should ensure that children can be restrained safely during a flight. Severe turbulence or a crash can create enough momentum that an adult cannot hold onto a child. The safest place for a child on an airplane is in a government-approved child safety restraint system (CRS) or device. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) strongly urges travelers to secure children in a CRS for the duration of the flight. Car seats cannot be used in all seats or on all planes, and some airlines might have limited safety equipment available. Travelers should check with the airline about specific restrictions and approved child restraint options. FAA provides additional information .

Altitude Illness & Acute Mountain Sickness

Children are as susceptible to the deleterious effects of high elevation travel as adults (see Sec. 4, Ch. 5, High Elevation Travel & Altitude Illness ). Slow ascent is the preferable approach for avoiding acute mountain sickness (AMS). Young children unable to talk can show nonspecific symptoms (e.g., loss of appetite or irritability, unexplained fussiness, changes in sleep and activity patterns). Older children might complain of headache or shortness of breath. If children demonstrate unexplained symptoms after an ascent, descent could be necessary.

Acetazolamide is not approved for pediatric use in children aged <12 years for altitude illness but is generally safe for use in children for other indications. Some providers prescribe acetazolamide to prevent AMS in pediatric travelers <12 years of age when a slow ascent is not feasible. The dose is 2.5 mg/kg every 12 hours, up to a maximum of 125 mg per dose, twice a day. No liquid formulation is available, but tablets can be crushed or packaged by a compounding pharmacy for a correct dose.

Drinking Water Contaminants

Drinking water disinfection does not remove environmental contaminants (e.g., lead or other metals). Travelers might want to carry specific filters designed to remove environmental contaminants, particularly for travel where the risk for exposure is greater due to larger amounts of water consumed (e.g., long-term travel or when living abroad). Filters should meet National Science Foundation (NSF) and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards 53 or 58 .

Accommodations: Hotels & Other Lodgings

Conditions at hotels and other lodgings abroad might not be as safe as those in the United States; adults traveling with children should carefully inspect accommodations for paint chips, pest poisons, inadequate balcony or stairway railings, or exposed wiring.

Adult caregivers should plan to provide a safe sleeping environment for infants during international travel. Caregivers should follow general recommendations from the AAP task force on preventing sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related causes of infant death. Cribs in some locations might not meet US safety standards. Additional information about crib safety is available from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission .

Motor Vehicles

Vehicle-related injuries are the leading cause of death in children who travel. Whenever traveling in an automobile or other vehicle, children should be properly restrained in a car seat, booster seat, or with a seat belt, as appropriate for their age, height, and weight. See information about child passenger safety . Car seats often must be brought from home because well-maintained and approved seats might not be available (or limited in availability) in other countries.

In general, children ≤12 years of age are safest when properly buckled in the rear seat of the car while traveling; no one should ever travel in the bed of a pickup truck. Advise families that cars might lack front or rear seatbelts in many low- and middle-income countries. Traveling families should attempt to arrange transportation or rent vehicles with seatbelts and other safety features.

All family members should wear helmets when riding bicycles, motorcycles, or scooters. Pedestrians should take caution when crossing streets, particularly in countries where cars drive on the left, because children might not be used to looking in that direction before crossing.

Water-Related Injuries & Drowning

Drowning is the second leading cause of death in young travelers. Children might not be familiar with hazards in the ocean or in rivers. Swimming pools might not have protective fencing to keep toddlers and young children from accessing pool areas unattended. Adults should closely supervise children around water. An adult with swimming skills should be within an arm’s length when infants and toddlers are in or around pools and other bodies of water; even for older children and better swimmers, the supervising adult should focus on the child and not be engaged with any distracting activities.

Water safety devices (e.g., personal flotation devices [lifejackets]) might not be available abroad, and families should consider bringing these from home. In addition, adults should ensure children wear protective footwear to avoid injury in many marine environments.

Sun Exposure

Sun exposure, and particularly sunburn before age 15 years, is strongly associated with melanoma and other forms of skin cancer (see Sec. 4, Ch. 1, Sun Exposure ). Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is greatest near the equator, at high elevations, during midday (10 a.m.–4 p.m.), and where light is reflected off water or snow.

Physical, also known as inorganic, UV filters (sunscreens) generally are recommended for children aged >6 months. Less irritating to children’s sensitive skin than chemical sunscreens, physical UV filters (e.g., titanium oxide, zinc oxide) should be applied as directed and reapplied as needed after sweating and water exposure. Babies aged <6 months require extra protection from the sun because of their thinner and more sensitive skin; severe sunburn in young infants is considered a medical emergency.

Advise parents that babies should be kept in the shade and dressed in clothing that covers the entire body. A minimal amount of sunscreen can be applied to small, exposed areas, including the infant’s face and hands. For older children, sun-blocking shirts made for swimming preclude having to apply sunscreen over the entire trunk. Hats and sunglasses also reduce sun injury to skin and eyes.

If both sunscreen and a DEET-containing insect repellent are used, apply the sunscreen first and the insect repellent second (i.e., over the sunscreen). Because insect repellent can diminish the level of UV protection provided by the sunscreen by as much as one-third, children should also wear sun-protective clothing, reapply sunscreen, or decrease their time in the sun, accordingly.

Other Considerations

Identification.

In case family members become separated, each infant or child should carry identifying information and contact numbers in their clothing or pockets. Because of concerns about illegal transport of children across international borders, parents traveling alone with children should carry relevant custody papers or a notarized permission letter from the other parent.

As with adult travelers, verify insurance coverage for illnesses and injuries while abroad before departure. Travelers should consider purchasing special medical evacuation insurance for an airlift or air ambulance transport to facilities capable of providing adequate medical care (see Sec. 6, Ch. 1, Travel Insurance, Travel Health Insurance & Medical Evacuation Insurance ).

Travel Stress

Changes in schedule, activities, and environment can be stressful for children. Travelers can help decrease these stresses by including children in planning for the trip and bringing along familiar toys or other objects. For children with chronic illnesses, make decisions regarding timing and itinerary in consultation with the child’s health care providers.

The following authors contributed to the previous version of this chapter: Michelle S. Weinberg, Nicholas Weinberg, Susan A. Maloney

Bibliography

Ashkenazi S, Schwartz E. Traveler’s diarrhea in children: new insights and existing gaps. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2020;34:101503.

Fedorowicz Z, Jagannath VA, Carter B. Antiemetics for reducing vomiting related to acute gastroenteritis in children and adolescents. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;2011(9):CD005506.

Goldman-Yassen AE, Mony VK, Arguin PM, Daily JP. Higher rates of misdiagnosis in pediatric patients versus adults hospitalized with imported malaria. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2016;32(4):227–31.

Hagmann S, LaRocque R, Rao S, Jentes E, Sotir M, Brunette G, et al.; Global TravEpiNet Consortium. Pre-travel health preparation of pediatric international travelers: analysis from the Global TravEpiNet Consortium. J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc. 2013;2(4):327–34.

Hagmann S, Neugebauer R, Schwartz E, Perret C, Castelli F, Barnett ED, et al. Illness in children after international travel: analysis from the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network. Pediatrics. 2010;125(5):e1072–80.

Han P, Yanni E, Jentes E, Hamer D, Chen L, Wilson M, et al. Health challenges of young travelers visiting friends and relatives compared with those traveling for other purposes. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2012;31(9):915–9.

Herbinger KH, Drerup L, Alberer M, Nothdurft HD, Sonnenburg F, Loscher T. Spectrum of imported infectious diseases among children and adolescents returning from the tropics and subtropics. J Travel Med. 2012;19(3):150–7.

Hunziker T, Berger C, Staubli G, Tschopp A, Weber R, Nadal D, et al. Profile of travel-associated illness in children, Zurich, Switzerland. J Travel Med. 2012;19(3):158–62.

Mace K, Lucchi N, Tan K. Malaria surveillance—United States, 2017. MMWR Surveill Summ. 2021;70(2):1–40.

Niño-Serna LF, Acosta-Reyes J, Veroniki AA, Florez ID. Antiemetics in children with acute gastroenteritis: a meta-analysis. Pediatrics. 2020;145(4):e20183696.

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How to Travel with Baby Formula on a Plane

By the time my son turns two, we will have taken him on over 100 flights from shorter jaunts to nearby states to international flights that lasted for 16+ hours. Over that time we’ve gone from combo feeding him to transitioning to 100% formula.

Thankfully it’s pretty simple to bring your baby’s food along once you know the rules and best practices. Here’s everything to know about how to successfully travel with baby formula when you fly:

Table of Contents

TSA Regulations for Carry-Ons

flying with a baby tips

The first important thing to know is the TSA regulations regarding liquids, as you will most certainly have extra checks. Be sure to budget extra time for this! Whether you have TSA precheck or not, the following considerations all apply:

Liquid amounts

For baby food including breast milk, water for formula, liquid formula, juice, and other forms of milk, you’re allowed to bring “a reasonable amount” of each above the 100ml/container limit.

The amount that is reasonable to take through security is left up to the TSA officer. I have actually run into issues with this when they wanted us to dump one of our water bottles for his formula when our flight was only about an hour and a half. For reference we had 240 mls. I knew we were within our rights to have all of the water, and in case we had delays in the air, which has happened to us before, we needed to have it along. I remained polite but firm that we were allowed to have it and asked to speak to a supervisor, who agreed that the amount we had was, indeed, reasonable. If we’d had to dump, we could have bought water in the terminal, but I preferred to use our own.

I highly recommend printing out or saving TSA rules to your phone in case you run into any issues. Read full TSA rules here.

Extra checks

Almost no TSA experience has been the same for me, but 80% of them have involved extra checks for the liquids. Be sure to let the officer know before you go through security that you have liquids in excess of 100ml/3oz for your baby. They will probably pull them out for extra screening.

They are allowed to put the bottles through an extra machine and they are allowed to unscrew the top for a vapor test, they are not allowed to stick anything into the liquid.

I highly recommend using clear bottles , which usually means easier screening and fewer vapor tests.

Powder checks

If you have powder formula, they will probably run a white test strip over it for bomb testing as well. I have never had them open up the formula, but rather run the strip on the outside of the container. As far as I know there is no limit on the powder amounts. I’ve brought entirely full cans with me many times.

If you’re traveling abroad, be sure to look into the rules for the specific country you’re traveling out of. So far going through customs in Mexico and Japan , the experience has involved no additional checks and was much easier than US security.

Packing Formula Safely and Effectively

The worst thing would be a formula spill en route when it’s difficult to impossible to replace the formula. I’ve never actually seen formula for sale in the airport, and as far as I know Emirates is the only airline that stocks it onboard, so make sure that you bring more than enough with you in case of delays, and pack it securely.

We sometimes transfer formula to a clean Tupperware with locking lids. I also will store a can with a secure lid in the diaper bag. I make sure that I only bring unopened bags and cans of formula in my checked baggage and wrap them in clothing so that they don’t get jostled and burst. Though we don’t use liquid formula, I’d do the same with liquid cans.

That said, weight from liquid can add up quickly, and they tend to take up a lot more space, so if you also use powder, I would recommend only traveling with the powder. Also be sure to check whether your destination has formula you can easily buy. If you use a hypoallergenic or speciality formula, you may need to bring it all with you. We could have easily bought more in Mexico and Japan, though I’ve heard in destinations like Thailand it can be harder to find.

If You Need to Warm the Water

how to travel with baby formula

The best thing we ever did is slowly start only serving our baby room temperature formula. According to the CDC , formula does not need to be warmed to be safe to drink. When he’s hungry, we can just make a bottle on the spot. I like to pre-fill his Comotomo bottles with the exact amount of oz we’ll need for ease.

But what if your baby prefers it warm? No problem, this portable bottle/formula warmer can be charged ahead of time (or in your seat in a pinch). Consider bringing a portable power bank to recharge the warmer as needed.

I have also been offered warm water from flight attendants previously, but since we only use bottled or boiled filtered water for his formula, I’ve used what we brought since I know the origins of it.

Washing Bottles on the Go

baby bottle washing station

I’m in love with our OXO baby bottle brush and drying rack . I joke it’s the best $18 I’ve ever spent. We even use it at home to keep our son’s bottles totally separate from the rest of our dishes.

It folds up for easy portability and fits into our diaper bag with ease. I recommend bringing your own soap in a carry-on size bottle since airport and airplane soap is usually not the kind that you would want to use on bottles. It can be heavily scented, foam, or high in chemicals and antibacterial agents.

You can easily wash bottles in the airport bathroom or lounges. On the flights, I use filtered water from my own water bottle that I get in the terminal. If I’m out of that, I asked the flight attendant for a bottle of water. It’s never been an issue. I tend not to use the water from the top on planes as sometimes it’s not potable and I also I’m not sure about the state of their water trucks. For me I would not care, but for my baby I’m extra cautious.

Where, When, and How to Feed

As formula feeding parents know, the ease of being able to bottle feed anywhere is delightful. We have walked through the airport with our son in a carrier ( I like this one for travel days) feeding him while we walk. We are also always sure to feed during takeoff and landing to help clear his ears.

Formula feeding has been way easier than pumping, though if you combo feed, I have tips for pumping on the go and traveling with breast milk for you, too.

Overall, flying with formula is pretty simple once you know the rules and how to properly store it. It’s a bit more to travel with, but it’s not a big deal, either. Happy flying!

*Some links in this post are affiliate links that support us at no extra cost to you when you purchase through them. We only recommend products we love and use ourselves. Your trust always comes first!

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Kristin is the founder of Parenthood Adventures, combining her love of travel and newfound joy of motherhood. She's the creator of one of the most-read women's travel blogs in the world, bemytravelmuse.com, with a readership in the millions each year.

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Taking our first flight with our daughter (3 months old) next week. It’s a 12 day trip which is a bit intimidating! I am combo feeding so this is helpful! Planning to leave my pump supplies at home and just do breast/formula.

You got this! Have fun! It’s a great age to travel with.

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Flying with breast milk or formula? Don't worry about liquid limits. Here's what to know.

baby formula for travel

Actress Keke Palmer called out airport security officers in Houston this month on Twitter , saying they threatened to throw out more than 16 ounces of breast milk as she was going through security.

The officers were unambiguously in the wrong if they did ask her to get rid of her breast milk.

A Transportation Security Administration spokesperson told USA TODAY the agency was not aware of the incident but said travelers are encouraged to submit comments and concerns to the agency directly if they encounter issues during their screening. 

TSA regulations make generous allowances for milk and formula:

Formula, breast milk, toddler drinks, and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces or 100 milliliters are allowed in carry-on baggage and do not need to fit within a quart-sized bag. Formula, breast milk, toddler drinks, and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) are considered medically necessary liquids. This also applies to breast milk and formula cooling accessories, such as ice packs, freezer packs, and gel packs (regardless of presence of breast milk). Your child or infant does not need to be present or traveling with you to bring breast milk, formula and/or related supplies.

Travelers can also notify the TSA if they plan to travel with medically necessary liquids. 

Nikeytha Ramsey, founder and CEO of Junobie, a company that produces sustainable, plastic-free storage containers for breast milk and baby formula, said it’s important for parents to know their rights when they fly with such liquids and to stick up for them if they run into any problems.

“It says it right here on your website that I am allowed to fly. Breast milk does not count against the 3.4-ounce rule. Neither does baby formula,” she said. “So just like what your website says ... I would appreciate if you can honor this right now for us.”

Ramsey added that it’s usually a good idea to notify TSA agents about any breast milk or formula you may be traveling with before your screening starts.

“You never know what TSA agent you are going to get. You can get a really, really pleasant TSA agent and they're not going to really give you any issues,” she said. “I will inform TSA, ‘Hey, I do have breast milk,’ or if you are a parent that has baby formula or baby food, inform them that you do have these things. That's what I always do. And they will take it over to either the bottle X-ray to screen it, or they will do what we call a vapor test.”

Tell us your story: Mobility device lost or damaged by an airline? USA TODAY wants to hear about it.

Sens. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, and Steve Danes, R-Mont., reintroduced legislation in May that would require the TSA to better educate its officers about its policies, citing reports from constituents of complaints similar to Palmer’s.

“Too often, I hear stories of traveling moms being mistreated and denied access to their breast milk and the breastfeeding equipment that they need to pump and feed their babies,” Duckworth said in a statement . “Many of these incidents are inconsistent with TSA’s screening policies, which is why I’m proud to reintroduce this bipartisan legislation to ensure TSA keeps its employees up to speed on their own policies and updates those policies as necessary. It’s the least we can do to help make sure parents traveling through our airports are given the respect and dignity they deserve.”

The Bottles and Breastfeeding Equipment Screening Enhancement (BABES) Act would require the TSA to:

  • Issue guidance promoting the hygienic handling of any breast milk, baby formula or other infant nutrition products, as well as accessories traveling through checkpoints.
  • Consult with nationally recognized maternal health organizations in establishing and communicating the guidance to officers and travelers.
  • Update its guidance every five years to respond to the emerging needs of parents and to account for developments in technology.

For now, the TSA recommends traveling with breast milk or formula in clear, translucent bottles rather than in bags, which can be harder to screen.

Travelers should know their rights when flying with breast milk, formula or related devices, and they can check out the TSA’s full guidelines linked again here .

Contributing: Ariana Triggs, USA TODAY

Zach Wichter is a travel reporter for USA TODAY based in New York. You can reach him at [email protected]

How to Travel with Baby Formula (Explained)

By: Author Elizabeth Ciobanu

Posted on 06/21/2022

Categories Planning

Traveling with a bottle-fed baby can be overwhelming because there are so many moving parts to keep track of. But considering the comfort and health of your baby, the best approach is to plan ahead for everything you will need for your journey with your baby.

baby formula for travel

You need to consider several things when traveling with baby formula. First is the number of days you will be away and the safety of the formula.

Taking enough formula shouldn’t be an issue when traveling in the car, but if it’s by plane, there are restrictions on how much prepared formula you can bring.

You don’t have to cancel your travel plans because your baby is too young. You can still travel and enjoy yourself with proper planning.

This blog post will guide you on how to travel with baby formula by car or plane. I will also discuss some other topics related to traveling with baby formula to help you feel confident and ready for your trip.

How To Travel With Baby Formula By Car

baby formula for travel

You’ve probably traveled with your baby in the car many times already, but taking a longer trip might seem daunting.

Nevertheless, you will have to be a bit strategic because traveling by car often takes longer than a plane trip.

Also, you have less freedom to move the baby about or offer comfort while she is strapped in her car seat.

One such hassle while traveling with your baby in the car is that it is not safe to feed your baby in a moving car even if they can hold the bottle by themselves. You will need to stop to give the baby her bottle.

But here are some strategies that will help you be more efficient on your car trip with your baby.

Bottle Preparation

Preparing the baby’s bottle of formula before hitting the road is the most important thing to do. Ensure your hands are clean to avoid contamination that might lead to stomach upsets.

Get this done before you leave, as you may not have a clean way of preparing the bottle during those pit stops you make on the road.

Once the bottle is clean, fill it with the baby formula and pack it in an insulated bag or a cooler, but make sure you use any prepared bottles within 24 hours.

baby formula for travel

Keep Everything Within Your Reach

Ensure everything the baby needs is kept up front (not packed under all the suitcases in the trunk!) before hitting the road. Realizing that you left something you need at the back of the car when feeding the baby might be frustrating.

Ensure you can access the baby’s bottle and warmer easily and start warming the formula in time so that it will be ready when you stop.

Have a Place To Store The Used Feeding Bottles

Cleaning used bottles before reaching your destination may not be practical. It is therefore wise to have a wet bag for storing them. This way, you will avoid having your car cluttered with bottles.

You can also sanitize the bottles and wipe the wet bag easily once you have arrived at your destination.

How To Travel With Baby Formula By Plane

baby formula for travel

Parents traveling with infants are allowed to carry bottles of baby formula when traveling by plane. But you must be strategic about carrying it and feeding your baby as easily as possible without missing or delaying the baby’s feeding time.

The following tips should help you think through how to do this.

Prepare The Bottles Ahead of Time

Airport navigation is not easy, not to mention the process of boarding the plane. You will have a lot to worry about, so you should prepare the bottles in advance.

Kids’ health experts advise that you can prepare a baby’s formula up to 24 hours ahead of time, provided you refrigerate it. Take advantage of this and store baby formula in a cooler bag. It will be easier to pull it out and warm it during feeding.

Carry a Travel Bottle Warmer

A baby bottle warmer is essential when traveling by plane or car. It is the only way you can warm the milk well in advance. This way, you won’t have to rush and start warming the milk when your baby gets angry.

You don’t also don’t want to bother passengers with a crying baby, so it’s good to put the formula in the warmer in advance.

Feed The Baby When The Plane Takes Off

A strategic plan is to feed your baby when the plane is taking off. This will come in handy in keeping the baby calm during the transition and helping your baby’s ears adjust to pressure changes.

Also, feeding the young one at this time will increase the chances of falling asleep for a better part of the flight. If this happens, you will get time to relax after the stressful moment of boarding the plane.

Which Baby Formula is Best For Traveling?

There are several baby formula options you can consider when traveling.

One option is to carry some water and a premeasured formula. However, this method demands that you avoid using a vacuum flask for the formulas’ storage since it may cause some security issues, especially at the airport.

The other better option is carrying ready-made formula. It is easy to use because all you are required to do is pour the formula into the baby’s feeding bottle. Some airports have baby shops where you can buy the formula before checking in.

Nevertheless, you must confirm with the airport you will be flying from and know the type of formula they stock, and the cost.

What Are The Must-Haves When Traveling With Baby Formula?

Formula powder dispensers.

Any on-the-go parent must have a formula dispenser when traveling. The containers help in preparing quick bottles. It holds and measures the formula for you. They come in different types and sizes; therefore, you can choose one depending on your preference and traveling schedule.

While it may seem more convenient to just pick up some formula from wherever you’re heading, there’s no guarantee that you’ll be able to find your usual brand. It’s best to take a good supply of what your baby is used to so minimize the chances of stomach upset or baby refusing the bottle.

Convenient Bottle

You need a convenient bottle when traveling, and one that baby has already gotten used to at home. Don’t try to change things up the day you leave, but get her used to the travel bottle well before leaving.

Pick a bottle that’s easy to carry, clean, and use.

Also, bottles that come with pre-sterilized liners are better because they not only ensure your bottle is clean but also reduce the time you take to clean it up, hence perfect for travel.

Water For Baby Formula

If the type of baby formula you are carrying requires some water to make, you should carry the water with you. You can carry distilled, tap, or bottled water since they are considered best for making baby formulas.

Nevertheless, you may have to boil the tap water to kill any microbes that could be in it. Do this before leaving home!

Traveling with your baby doesn’t have to be a nightmare. All you need to do is plan your trip well, whether traveling by air or car.

Also, remember to carry everything you need to make the baby formula when it’s feeding time. This way, you will have an easy time far away from home.

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Best formula dispensers

Sarah Gard Lazarus, D.O.

  • Best formula dispenser overall :
  • Best formula dispenser for travel :
  • Best formula dispenser and mixer :
  • Best formula pitcher :

What to look for in formula dispensers

If you feed your baby formula and buy powder in large cans or tubs, you already know that these sizable containers aren't convenient to carry with you. They're easy enough to use when they're sitting on your kitchen counter, but if you hope to feed your baby away from home you need a different solution. Enter the formula dispenser. 

These small and inexpensive containers, usually made of plastic, easily fit into a diaper bag and allow you to pre-measure formula powder. They generally hold enough powder to make three to five bottles that are 8 to 9 ounces each; all you have to do is pour water into your bottle, add powder, and mix. (And before you ask, mixing the bottles in advance is no good, as the American Academy of Pediatrics says prepared formula must be refrigerated.) 

How we chose the best formula dispensers

  • We spoke with two members of the BabyCenter staff who told us how they used and liked two of the formula dispensers on this list. 
  • Convenience
  • Ease of use
  • Portability  

Best formula dispenser overall

Accmor baby milk powder formula dispenser.

Inexpensive and indispensable, these containers are our favorite because of how well they hold varying amounts of formula. Each of this dispenser's four compartments holds 3.3 ounces (90 grams) of formula — easily enough powder to make four 8- to 9-ounce bottles. "I love that it has multiple containers so I could easily store multiple bottles-worth of formula, which came in handy if we were traveling or going to be out all day," says BabyCenter Associate Director of Commerce Leah Rocketto. “It was also nice that I could store enough formula to make anywhere from 2- to 8-ounce bottles, so I could feed my daughter a snack or a meal.” 

The Accmor dispenser is designed to keep bottle mixing tidy, too. You snap off the clear cap, screw off the top (it comes with or without a carrying handle, your choice), and then you can nestle the open container right into your water-filled bottle. Give the upside-down dispenser a few smacks, and all the powder from the top clear container lands neatly in the water. Then you can screw off the empty container, and replace the lid and cap on the full one below. There: you're ready to make another bottle. 

Another thing we love about this dispenser: It can be repurposed as a snack container, which Leah did when her daughter moved from formula to solids. It does take up more space in a diaper bag than other dispensers, but Leah says it stores easily in the side bottle pockets, which many diaper bags have. 

Heads up This dispenser also comes in a version with five containers. Opens a new window

Parents say "I used these things to keep pre-measured formula in the diaper bag. I also filled a regular water bottle with distilled water to keep in the bag. these containers are also great for keeping snacks in for the diaper bag (puffs, yogurt bites, cheezits, etc)."

  • Number of servings: Four 9-ounce bottles
  • Size: 8.7 x 3.1 inches
  • Material: Plastic
  • Color options: 2  

Best formula dispenser for travel

Dr. brown’s baby formula dispenser.

This dispenser from Dr. Brown's holds formula in three compartments, each one holding enough for 9-ounce bottles. But it's short so it fits well into more types of bags: diaper bags, purses, duffels, and so on. Parents say that the lid snaps on tightly and the powder doesn't spill even if the dispenser gets turned upside down. To dispense formula, simply spin the lid over a fill compartment, open the spout, and pour into your bottle. 

"I keep it in my diaper bag in case I need to mix a bottle for Vivian while we're away from home," says Jamison Hermann, Senior Producer for Everyday Health Group. "The lid is easy to open with one hand, which is helpful when you've got a hungry baby waiting on you. The cap stays shut in my diaper bag even with lots of stuff piled on top of it."

Heads up This product comes in three colors, but retailers often only stock the pink and blue, not the gray. 

  • Number of servings: Three 9-ounce bottles
  • Size: 3.3 x 3.9 inches
  • Color options: 3  

Best formula dispenser and mixer

Popyum anti-colic formula making baby bottles.

For take-along bottles, you can’t get simpler than this ingeniously designed bottle. Measure water into the bottle and powdered formula into the lid. Then, when hunger strikes, press the button on the side to release the formula into the water, shake it, and feed your baby. And The whole job can be done one-handed just in case your other hand is soothing a hungry babe. 

Parents say this multitasking bottle is great for trips to the park, beach, or campgrounds: Since you don't have to open anything, you don't run the risk of dirt and sand getting into the bottle. It's also perfect for middle-of-the-night feeds when you don't trust yourself to carefully measure and pour powder. Parents add that the lid stays on stoutly, and the formula and water stay separate, even if the bottle is turned on its side or shaken up in transit. 

Heads up You'll need a separate PopYum for each bottle you want to feed your baby, which eats up space if you're out a long time. 

  • Number of servings: One 5- or 9-ounce bottle
  • Size: 4.7 x 2.84 inches (5-ounce); 6.3 x 2.84 inches (9-ounce)
  • Color options: 1  

Best formula pitcher

Munchkin smart blend formula mixing pitcher.

Although it’s not ideal for on-the-go dispensing, we’d be remiss not to feature Munchkin’s formula pitcher. Parents of twins call this pitcher a lifesaver, as do other parents who prefer to make a big batch of formula to use throughout the day. 

Munchkin's pitcher looks and operates a bit like a French press. Add water and formula, replace the lid, and use the loop on the top to pump the machine’s blade up and down a few times. The result is up to 24 ounces of lump-free formula. 

We love the clear ounce and millimeter markings on the side and the locking lid that keeps no air from getting into your formula. Another appreciated feature: The spinning ring at the top to mark what time the formula was made. Since prepared formula should be discarded after 24 hours, Opens a new window according to the AAP, the ring prevents any second-guessing.. 

Heads up Some parents complain this mixer makes bubbles, but others say if you keep the mixing element beneath the water's surface you avoid mixing in air. 

Parents say "I have a Munchkin formula pitcher and I highly recommend it. So much easier and more accurate."

"I have the Munchkin Smart Blend Formula Mixing Pitcher. You can turn a dial to mark the time you made the formula."

"I have the munchkin mixing pitcher and it’s great.  I only mix formula once a day!"

"I also have the munchkin formula pitcher for mixing large amounts to make my son's bottles for daycare the next day. Definitely a huge time saver!"

  • Number of servings: 24 ounces of formula
  • Size: 9 x 3.2 inches
  • Color options: 1

When searching for the formula dispensers t, here somethings tolconsider:

  • Compartment size: Make sure that each compartment can hold enough powder for the amount of formula your baby is drinking at each feed. 
  • Number of compartments: You'll want enough compartments to match the maximum number of bottles you may need when out and about. 
  • Dispenser size: Will the dispenser fit neatly in whatever you're using to carry it, whether it's a suitcase, diaper bag, or stroller basket? 
  • Longevity: Is there a way to use your dispenser after your baby is no longer drinking formula? 
  • Price: Formula dispensers are inexpensive, but a few dollars matter. 

Kelly Bailey contributed to this story  

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The Best Baby Formula

Six containers of baby formula from different brands.

No matter how you do it, feeding a baby is hard work.

If you’re using formula, there are the added challenges of deciphering long lists of ingredients and distinguishing among the dozens of brands and types. And formulas can differ drastically in cost, which can create more confusion, not to mention worry.

We spent more than 80 hours researching formulas, interviewing pediatricians and other experts, and reading more than 20 scientific studies and journal articles. And we learned that all FDA-approved formulas made for healthy, full-term infants are safe and nutritionally adequate for normal growth and development from birth through the first year. We then analyzed the ingredients of more than 60 formulas to find the ones that we think offer the best combination of evidence-backed benefits and value.

Everything we recommend

baby formula for travel

Kirkland Signature ProCare Non-GMO Infant Formula

The best traditional formula.

This Costco formula contains lactose (the same sugar that’s in human milk) as the only carbohydrate. And it has many of the same potentially beneficial extras found in more expensive options.

Buying Options

baby formula for travel

Member’s Mark Infant

Another great traditional formula.

This Sam’s Club formula also uses lactose as its only carbohydrate. And it has several potentially beneficial extra ingredients found in much more expensive formulas.

baby formula for travel

Up & Up Advantage Premium Infant Formula

A little more expensive, available in smaller quantities.

This Target formula also uses lactose as its sole carbohydrate, and it has many of the same extra nutrients as formulas that cost twice as much.

baby formula for travel

Parent’s Choice Tender Non-GMO Infant Formula

The best “gentle” formula.

This Walmart formula is made with all partially hydrolyzed whey protein, which may be easier for some babies to digest than the intact milk proteins used in our traditional formula picks.

May be out of stock

baby formula for travel

Up & Up Hypoallergenic Infant Formula

The best hypoallergenic formula.

This Target formula is made with extensively hydrolyzed casein proteins and is typically appropriate for babies who have certain diagnoses, like cow’s milk protein allergy.

baby formula for travel

Aussie Bubs Organic Grass Fed Infant Formula Stage 1

The best organic formula.

This is among the least expensive organic formulas that uses lactose as its sole carbohydrate. It’s also one of the few that contains the potentially beneficial component MFGM.

baby formula for travel

Aussie Bubs Goat Milk Infant Formula Stage 1

The best goat milk formula.

This is currently the only goat milk-based infant formula available in the US. But it is expensive.

What to consider

Experts say most babies do well on formula with lactose (the same sugar in human milk) as the sole carbohydrate.

Protein in formula can be either intact or partially or fully broken down, which may be easier for some babies to digest.

All baby formulas must meet the same basic nutritional requirements. Some include extra nutrients like DHA, ARA, and prebiotics.

Generic formulas are as nutritious as brand-name options and often significantly less expensive.

Because traditional formulas are all required to meet the same basic nutritional standards, we looked for the most affordable formulas that offer the most additional potential benefits. Costco’s Kirkland Signature ProCare Non-GMO Infant Formula (about 64¢ per ounce, and slightly less if you’re a Costco member) uses lactose, the sugar naturally found in human milk. And this formula provides many of the same extra nutrients you’ll find in formulas that cost two or three times as much.

Sam’s Club’s Member’s Mark Infant (around 50¢ per ounce, and a little less if you’re a Sam’s Club member) includes expert-recommended ingredients, such as lactose (the carbohydrate found in human milk), as well as a few desirable extras. This formula is also sold as Up & Up Infant at Target, Parent’s Choice Premium Infant at Walmart, and Mama Bear Infant on Amazon, so it’s easy to find.

Though slightly more expensive than our main picks, Up & Up Advantage Premium (around 60¢ per ounce) is still one of the least expensive formulas we found. Unlike our main picks, this formula is available in a smaller, 35-ounce size. It’s also sold in grocery and drugstore chains, as Walmart Parent’s Choice Advantage Premium , Sam’s Club Member’s Mark Advantage Premium , CVS Health Advantage Premium , and Amazon’s Mama Bear Advantage Premium , among others, so it’s also easy to find.

Parent’s Choice Tender, our “gentle” formula pick, is being discontinued. As alternatives, consider Gerber Good Start GentlePro or Bobbie Organic Gentle . Read on for more information about these formulas .

Most babies do well on traditional formula, but if your pediatrician recommends giving your baby a “gentle,” “tender,” or partially hydrolyzed formula (containing partly broken-down milk proteins, which may be easier for some babies to digest), we suggest the generic Parent’s Choice Tender (around 60¢ per ounce). At around two-thirds the price of brand-name formulas, it’s the cheapest partially hydrolyzed formula we found. But it has many of the same potentially beneficial additives as much more expensive brands.

If your doctor recommends a hypoallergenic formula, Up & Up Hypoallergenic Infant Formula is equivalent to Enfamil Nutramigen and Similac Alimentum but available at a fraction of the price (roughly $1.46 per ounce). It’s also non-GMO and kosher. It’s the same as other store-brand hypoallergenic formulas, including CVS Health Hypoallergenic Infant Formula , Mama Bear Hypoallergenic Infant Formula , Walgreens Well Beginnings Hypoallergenic Infant Formula , and Parent’s Choice Hypoallergenic Infant Formula , among others.

If you want a formula made from USDA-certified organic ingredients, we recommend Aussie Bubs Organic Grass Fed Infant Formula Stage 1 . It’s among the least expensive organic formulas we found that has lactose as its only carbohydrate, and it contains whole milk in addition to nonfat milk. Some evidence suggests that milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), which is naturally found in whole milk, may be beneficial.

Goat’s milk is sometimes considered more similar to human milk than cow’s milk, because, like human milk, it predominantly contains A2 beta-casein protein. (Most cow’s milk contains mainly A1 beta-casein.) Because Aussie Bubs Goat Milk Infant Formula Stage 1 is made with whole goat milk, it also contains milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), which may be beneficial. There aren’t any studies that suggest goat milk is better than other formulas as far as tolerability , though there isn’t an abundance of research on it. It’s the most expensive of our picks, at about $1.70 per powdered ounce.

The research

Why you should trust us, what to know about baby formula, how we picked, our pick: kirkland signature procare non-gmo infant formula, our pick: member’s mark infant, also great: up & up advantage premium infant formula, the best gentle formula: parent’s choice tender infant formula, the best hypoallergenic formula: up & up hypoallergenic infant formula, the best organic formula: aussie bubs organic grass fed infant formula stage 1, the best goat milk formula: aussie bubs goat milk infant formula stage 1, what’s in baby formula, understanding baby formula labels, formula safety and recalls, more baby formulas to consider, what about toddler formula.

We interviewed seven experts and read more than a dozen scientific studies, journal articles , reports , and advances to understand formula ingredients, nutrients, and other components. We looked at information from the FDA and CDC to learn how formula is regulated and tested in the US. Finally, we analyzed the nutrition and ingredients labels of some 50 formulas to understand the differences and similarities among them.

I’m a freelance science writer with a PhD in cell biology and have covered health topics for The Atlantic , Undark , Smithsonian , and more . I have three kids, and I’ve experienced the difficulties that come with infant feeding. Also, I’m fascinated by nutrition science.

Four containers of infant formulas we recommend, shown stacked together.

All babies require either human milk (breast milk), baby formula, or a combination of the two during the first year of life.

Four companies manufacture the vast majority of baby formula for sale in the US. Those companies are Mead Johnson ( Enfamil ), Abbott Nutrition ( Similac ), Nestlé ( Gerber ), and Perrigo (which makes generic formulas sold in many grocery and pharmacy chains and by other brands, including Earth’s Best and Bobbie ). A few smaller manufacturers have more recently entered the market: ByHeart (made in the US), Kendamil (made in the UK), and Aussie Bubs (made in Australia).

All infant formula sold in the US and labeled for healthy babies is safe. It will support normal growth and development from birth through 12 months. The FDA tightly regulates and monitors baby formula and has strict requirements for its nutrients , ingredients, composition, and manufacturing processes.

Brand-name and store-name formulas are nearly identical. A 2017 article on infant feeding in the journal Pediatrics states this. Pediatricians Jenny Thomas and Anthony Porto both told us that parents should feel comfortable using store-brand or generic infant formulas because they contain all of the same FDA-required nutrients and ingredients as formulas made by Enfamil, Similac, and Gerber (which cost two to three times as much).

Much of what you’ll read on a formula container is just marketing. There are formulas marketed for constipation , spit-up , fussiness , and more. Yes, there are differences among formulas, but “in terms of ‘this formula is for colic, this formula is for constipation’—all formulas have to meet the needs of all infants in the US, from 0 to 12 months. So you can’t have a formula that’s just for a baby who is also breastfed, or a 2-month-old baby who is constipated,” baby feeding expert Bridget Young said.

Switching formulas is most often not a big deal. Thomas said that most babies will tolerate changing formula brands and formulations well: “Switching from formula to formula is not a hardship on the baby.” Thomas, Porto, and Young all agree that if your baby is feeding well and happily on a certain formula, there’s probably no reason to change it, though.

But any given baby may have specific needs. Some otherwise healthy babies without allergies do have trouble digesting certain formulas and can exhibit gassiness, spit-up, constipation, or fussiness. Porto said it can be hard to determine whether it’s the formula that might be causing trouble for your baby (and, if so, which component of the formula). If the formulas we recommend in this guide aren’t right for your baby, or you use the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), or you’re interested in what makes other formulas different, take a look at More baby formulas to consider .

Six containers of baby formula from different brands.

Since 2017, we’ve considered every powdered formula available in the US.

Here we focus on powdered formulas because they are the most commonly used (PDF) and most economical, and they come in the most varieties. The 2022 formula shortage led to more imported formulas entering the US market. For a 2023 update to this guide we added imported formulas that remain available beyond the temporary supply brought in to help alleviate the shortage.

Based on our extensive research and conversations with multiple experts, there were only a few criteria we used to whittle down our list of contenders for the best formulas:

Traditional and organic formulas should have lactose as the sole carbohydrate. Since lactose is the energy-providing carbohydrate naturally found in all mammals' milk, and because formula seeks to mimic human milk as closely as possible, infant feeding experts told us it’s preferable to choose a formula that has lactose as the sole sugar. Most healthy babies don’t have issues digesting lactose, and there is little evidence that reduced lactose or lactose-free formulas reduce colic. For this reason, we didn’t consider any “sensitive” formulas that were lactose-free. (Most partially hydrolyzed formulas include another sweetener in addition to lactose, and all fully hydrolyzed formulas lack lactose.)

“Gentle” or “tender” formulas should contain only partially hydrolyzed proteins. If a pediatrician believes your baby would benefit from a “gentle” formula (which may be easier to digest), it should not contain “intact” proteins along with the partially hydrolyzed ones. (If the label lists milk in addition to hydrolyzed milk or hydrolyzed whey, then it contains both intact and partially hydrolyzed proteins.) This is because, according to Young (video) , the presence of some intact proteins will negate any benefits the partially broken down proteins could offer. (Imagine that you’re lactose-intolerant and you order an almond-milk latte but still put whipped cream on top.)

Finally, we considered cost. Formulas can range from just under 50¢ to nearly $2 per ounce of powder or more; this translates to about 45¢ to $1.75 per 6-ounce bottle. We found that many less expensive formulas have most or all of the same extra nutrients as more expensive ones.

We looked only at cow- and goat-milk–based formulas. Pediatricians Anthony Porto and Jenny Thomas told us they recommend soy-based formulas only if the baby has a medical need for it, or if parents want their baby to follow a vegan diet; this is also the guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

We did not look at certain formulas like HiPP and Holle that aren’t regulated by the FDA and aren’t sold in US stores.

We also did not consider formulas intended for babies who are premature or who have certain other medical conditions, including formulas whose proteins come in the form of amino acids (such as Elecare, Puramino, Neocate, or Alfamino).

We didn’t do any testing for this guide, because babies have minds of their own, and it would be impossible to control for all of the variables that might make a baby prefer one formula over another.

A container of Kirkland Signature ProCare Non-GMO Infant Formula.

At about 64¢ per ounce (for a pack of two 42-ounce containers), Kirkland Signature ProCare Non-GMO Infant Formula is among the least expensive traditional formulas we found. Yet it is just as safe and nutritious as formulas that cost much more.

It uses lactose as the sole carbohydrate, and it has added whey protein, in addition to nonfat milk, to make the protein ratio more similar to that of human milk (close to 50% whey and 50% casein). It also includes the extra nutrients DHA and ARA, lutein, taurine, L-carnitine, nucleotides, and two prebiotics (fructooligosaccharides and 2’-FL). This formula uses safflower oil, rather than palm oil, which may be a benefit if you are concerned about constipation (though our experts said palm oil is unlikely to impact a baby’s stool).

Close-up of the ingredient list and nutrients of the Kirkland Signature ProCare formula.

Kirkland Signature ProCare Non-GMO Infant Formula is a generic formula available only at Costco. (However, Instacart now delivers Costco products without a membership—the delivery company’s upcharge makes the formula about 65¢ an ounce). The Costco representative we corresponded with said its policy is to not disclose the company that manufactures its formula, but Perrigo lists the Kirkland formula on its website . Kirkland Signature ProCare Non-GMO has a similar ingredients list to the brand-name Similac Pro-Advance , which costs more than $1 per ounce.

Flaws but not dealbreakers

Some reviewers have complained that the ProCare formula comes with an opaque blue scoop, which makes it harder to gauge the measurement.

This formula is available online only as packs of two or four 42-ounce containers, enough for about 68 or 136 8-ounce bottles. If you want to buy smaller quantities of formula at a time, you can purchase individual Kirkland formula 42-ounce cans in-store.

Although you don’t have to be a Costco member to buy this formula online, non-members pay a 5% surcharge. But even with that charge, this formula remains significantly less expensive than similar formulas from Similac and Enfamil .

Container of Member’s Mark Infant formula.

Like Kirkland Signature ProCare, Member’s Mark Infant is produced by Perrigo. Its ingredients list is largely the same as that of Kirkland Signature ProCare , with protein from nonfat milk and added whey, and lactose as the sole carbohydrate (making this formula’s protein close to 60% whey and 40% casein). Member’s Mark Infant contains both galactooligosaccharides and fructooligosaccharides as prebiotics, and DHA and ARA. It also uses palm oil in addition to other vegetable oils.

Close-up of the ingredient list and nutrients of the Member’s Mark Infant formula.

At about 48¢ an ounce (if you’re a Sam’s Club member; if not, you’ll pay a 10% upcharge), this formula is barely a third the cost of brand-name formulas, like Enfamil Premium Infant (which has a similar ingredients list).

Member’s Mark comes in a smaller quantity than Kirkland Signature ProCare (one 48-ounce container, versus Kirkland’s four 42-ounce containers when bought online). Member’s Mark Infant is sold at Sam’s Club, and the exact same formula is also sold under other brands, including Up & Up Infant at Target, Parent’s Choice Premium Infant at Walmart, Little Journey Infant at Aldi, and Mama Bear Infant on Amazon. Though these versions are often more expensive than the Member’s Mark version, some of them are sold in smaller quantities, which could allow caregivers to try the formula before buying a full 48 ounces from Sam’s Club.

Though slightly more expensive than Kirkland Signature ProCare and Member’s Mark Infant , Target’s Up & Up Advantage Premium Infant Formula is still one of the least expensive formulas we found, yet it contains many of the same beneficial ingredients as much more expensive formulas, and comes in smaller sizes than our top picks.

It uses lactose as the sole carbohydrate, the protein is from nonfat milk and whey protein (making the protein in this formula 52% whey and 48% casein), and includes the extra nutrients DHA and ARA, lutein, taurine, L-carnitine, nucleotides, and a prebiotics (2’-FL). Like Kirkland’s formula, Up & Up Advantage Premium does not contain palm oil.

Like the ProCare and Member’s Mark formulas, this one is manufactured by Perrigo; it is also sold as Walmart Parent’s Choice Advantage Premium , Sam’s Club Member’s Mark Advantage Premium Baby Formula , CVS Health Advantage Premium , and Amazon Brand Mama Bear Advantage Premium , among others.

Up & Up Advantage Premium (and the equivalent generics) are available in smaller, 12.4-ounce and 23.2-ounce sizes, as well as in a 35-ounce size.

Container of Parent’s Choice Tender infant formula.

“Gentle” or “tender” formulas use partially hydrolyzed milk proteins, which are partly broken down and may be easier for some babies to digest. If you or your child’s pediatrician thinks your baby might do well with a partially hydrolyzed formula, we suggest Parent’s Choice Tender Infant Formula , which is also manufactured by Perrigo.

It’s the least expensive partially hydrolyzed formula we found, costing about two-thirds the price of partially hydrolyzed formulas by Enfamil, Similac, and Gerber.

It uses only partially hydrolyzed milk protein, and it contains no intact proteins, as some formulas labeled “gentle” or “tender” do. (If you’re choosing a partially hydrolyzed formula for your baby’s digestion, you should ensure that it doesn’t also include intact proteins, because those larger proteins would negate any benefits the broken-down proteins might have.)

Close-up of the ingredient list and nutrients of the Parent’s Choice Tender infant formula.

Like all partially hydrolyzed formulas currently available in the US, Parent’s Choice Tender has an additional sweetener (maltodextrin). But it’s also one of the few partially hydrolyzed formulas that contain some lactose, which experts recommend. (Parent’s Choice Tender, Gerber Good Start GentlePro , and Enfamil Reguline are the only partially hydrolyzed formulas that contain at least 50% lactose and no intact proteins. Bobbie Organic Gentle is the only partially hydrolyzed formula that is 100% lactose.)

This formula’s protein is 100% whey, with no casein. It also contains several potentially beneficial extra ingredients, including DHA and ARA, taurine, L-carnitine, nucleotides, and a prebiotic (2’-FL).

A container of Up & Up Hypoallergenic Infant Formula.

Hypoallergenic formula contains proteins that are fully hydrolyzed, or broken down, to make them suitable for babies with certain diagnoses, such as cow’s-milk protein allergy. If your doctor says you need to use a hypoallergenic formula, we recommend Up & Up Hypoallergenic Infant Formula . It’s equivalent to Similac Alimentum or Enfamil Nutramigen , but it’s a fraction of the price.

As with Alimentum or Nutramigen, its main carbohydrate is a corn-based sugar (corn-syrup solids), its protein is in the form of casein hydrolysate (a kind of hydrolyzed protein), and it contains soy oil. Unlike Similac Alimentum but like Nutramigen, it contains palm oil.

Like our other store-brand picks, it’s made by Perrigo, and it is also sold as CVS Health Hypoallergenic Infant Formula , Mama Bear Hypoallergenic Infant Formula , Walgreens Well Beginnings Hypoallergenic Infant Formula , and Parent’s Choice Hypoallergenic Infant Formula , among others.

A container of Aussie Bubs Organic Grass Fed Infant Formula Stage 1.

If you want to feed your baby a formula made from organic ingredients, consider Bubs Organic Grass Fed Infant Formula Stage 1 . Organic formulas use ingredients extracted from USDA-certified organic milk and other food products, but they may contain synthetic ingredients that are not approved by the National Organic Standards Board.

Aussie Bubs formula is manufactured in Australia. The company's formulas are Clean Label Project certified , which means they are tested for chemicals of concern, including heavy metals, pesticide residues, and plasticizers. Aussie Bubs came to the US during the formula shortage of 2022, but a company spokesperson says the brand is here to stay.

This organic formula is made from grass-fed whole cow’s milk. Whole milk formula has only been available in the US in the last year, and it naturally contains the potentially beneficial ingredient milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), an ingredient our store-brand picks do not contain.

Close-up of the ingredient list and nutritional information of the Bubs Organic Grass Fed Infant Formula Stage 1.

In addition to grass-fed whole milk, the protein comes from organic whey, and organic nonfat milk, making the whey-to-casein ratio 60 to 40). The carbohydrate is primarily in the form of lactose. This formula contains a prebiotic (galactooligosaccharides), and it contains soy oil but no palm oil.

It is called “Stage 1” because in Australia (and Europe), formulas are sold in two stages—Stage 1 for babies 0 to 6 months old and Stage 2 for babies 6 to 12 months old. Each stage has its own nutrition requirements. However, in the US there is only one set of nutrition requirements, and stage 1 is most similar to other US formulas and can be used for babies 0 to 12 months old. (This formula is also available in Stage 2 for babies 6 to 12 months old.)

Aussie Bubs Organic is currently less expensive than our former choice for organic formula, Earth’s Best Organic Dairy Infant Formula . However, it’s not cheap. It ranges from $1.12 to $1.42 per powdered ounce, depending on where you buy it, making it more than double some of the generic formulas we recommend. If you would like a whole-milk option that’s a bit less expensive, Kendamil Stage 1 is a similar formula made without organic ingredients.

This formula contains less DHA than other organic options—just 4.43 mg per 100 calories ( Bobbie , ByHeart , and Kendamil organic formulas each contain at least 18 mg per 100 calories). While there isn’t consensus about how much DHA babies need (quantities vary considerably in human milk), formula makers in Europe are required to include 20 mg per 100 calories DHA.

Container of the Aussie Bubs Goat Milk Infant Formula Stage 1

If you want a goat milk formula, we recommend Aussie Bubs Goat Milk Infant Formula Stage 1 , from the same Australian manufacturer of our organic pick.

While there aren’t any studies that suggest goat milk is better than other formulas as far as tolerability , there isn’t an abundance of research on it. Goat’s milk is sometimes considered more similar to human milk than cow’s milk, because, like human milk, it contains A2 beta-casein protein . Most cow’s milk contains predominantly A1 beta-casein. (Some cows produce A2 beta-casein, and there are A2 cow’s milk formulas available.) However, goat milk does contain some A1 beta-casein. And if your baby has a cow’s milk protein allergy, goat milk is not a good option because of the similar proteins in both kinds of milk.

Because this formula contains full cream goat milk, like our organic pick , it also contains natural milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), which may be beneficial. And like our organic pick, this formula contains less DHA than some cow’s milk formulas, at 8.8 mg.

Close-up of the ingredients and nutritional information of the Bubs Goat Milk Follow On Formula Stage 2.

The carbohydrates are primarily in the form of lactose. It has a prebiotic (galactooligosaccharides), it contains palm oil but no soy oil, and the protein is from whole goat milk and whey from goat’s milk (making the whey-to-casein ratio 60 to 40).

Stage 1 can be used for infants up to 12 months old, whereas Bubs Goat Milk Follow On Formula Stage 2 is only for babies over six months.

Six containers of infant formulas, shown stacked together.

Baby formula available in the US is based on either cow’s milk, goat’s milk, or soy .

Carbohydrates and fats

Lactose is the carbohydrate occurring naturally in all mammalian milk, and it is the most abundant component of human milk. Some formulas marketed as “sensitive” have reduced lactose or are lactose-free and instead use corn syrup, sucrose, or other sugars. A Pediatrics in Review article states that “primary lactose intolerance is rare in children,” and most healthy babies are able to tolerate lactose, whether from cow’s milk, goat’s milk, or human milk. Pediatrician Anthony Porto said that when a baby is having issues digesting a formula, it’s usually due to the protein and not the carbohydrate.

Each formula brand uses its own standard blend of fats in all of its formulas. Fat is the second-most-abundant component of human milk, after carbohydrates. But all US formulas use plant-based fats, the most common being coconut, soy, sunflower, safflower, or palm oil. Young says for some babies, palm oil might contribute to constipation, but “most infants are able to pass stool while consuming palm oil just fine.” Porto said if a formula-fed baby has hard stools, palm oil wouldn’t be the first thing he would consider as a culprit. He would first make sure that the baby was hydrated, and then maybe recommend a formula with hydrolyzed proteins, since some babies have difficulty digesting intact milk proteins. However, if you want a formula that doesn’t use palm oil—some people may also want to avoid it for environmental reasons — Kirkland Signature ProCare , all Similac formulas , Bobbie , ByHeart , and Kendamil formulas don’t include it.

Milk proteins

Aside from carbohydrates and fats, milk formulas contain different forms of milk proteins:

  • Intact: The milk proteins have not been broken down. Baby formulas with intact proteins, often called “traditional” formulas, are the most commonly used.
  • Partially hydrolyzed: The milk proteins have been partly broken down, which makes them closer to the size of the proteins in human milk. Formulas with this type of protein are often labeled “gentle” or “tender,” and they are marketed as being easier to digest.
  • Extensively hydrolyzed and amino acids: The proteins have been fully broken down into peptides or amino acids. Formulas with extensively hydrolyzed protein are sometimes called “hypoallergenic,” and they’re for babies who are allergic to milk proteins or those who have or are at risk for other medical issues. You should consider these formulas only if your baby has a diagnosed medical need for them.
  • A2: In 2020, Enfamil, Gerber, and Similac released formulas featuring A2 milk . A1 and A2 refer to the type of beta-casein (a protein) found in milk. Human milk contains A2 beta-casein. Most cow’s milk contains predominantly A1 beta-casein. But some cows produce A2 beta-casein, which is used in A2 formulas and is claimed to be more similar to human milk. Porto is skeptical that there would be any benefit, but acknowledged that for a baby who seems to have a milk-protein sensitivity, A2 milk formula could potentially be easier to digest , in the same way that formulas with broken-down (or hydrolyzed) proteins are.
  • Whey versus casein: Most formulas include whey protein in addition to casein protein to make the ratio of the milk proteins more similar to human milk. Young generally advises first-time formula users (especially those whose babies have not yet started solids) to try a “formula that at least has some extra whey added. That’s because breast milk itself is whey predominant.” Human milk settles into a ratio that’s about 60% whey and 40% casein—though in the first few weeks after birth, human milk can be up to 90% whey. Some formulas use whey protein exclusively without any casein protein.

Extra nutrients

There are 29 FDA-mandated vitamins and nutrients that all infant formulas must include. Many formulas also have added nutrients and ingredients , which are intended to make formulas more similar to—or to confer benefits associated with—human milk. Here are some of the “extras” you’ll find (see the chart below for a full list ):

  • DHA and ARA are fatty acids present in human milk. Research suggests that DHA promotes brain and eye development, and that ARA plays a role in reducing inflammation. However, a systematic review of studies on DHA and ARA in formula have not shown conclusive benefits. Though DHA and ARA are not mandated by the FDA, almost all formulas now contain them. Young and Porto both said it’s worth feeding babies formula that includes these fatty acids for the potential benefits.
  • Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is a mix of phospholipids, fats, and proteins naturally coating the fats in human milk. MFGM is found in cow’s milk, too, but it’s only found in whole milk, and most formula brands use nonfat milk. But some companies that use nonfat milk are adding MFGM back in, calling the isolated form “whey protein-lipid concentrate.” There have been several studies on the impacts of feeding formula with MFGM added that suggest a slight increase in a measure of cognition at 12 months, compared with babies fed formula not containing MFGM. Other studies show a slightly lower risk of infection with MFGM formula. However, many of these studies were funded by the formula industry, and overall, researchers conclude that MGFM needs more studies before we can say for sure whether it’s beneficial.
  • Over 200 kinds of prebiotics , or oligosaccharides (sugar molecules), are present in human milk. They feed a baby’s gut microbes, and are the third-most-abundant component of human milk after carbohydrates and fats. Human-milk researcher Lars Bode told us that the unique prebiotic components in human milk positively affect the baby’s gut microbiome and immune system, prevent infection, and have other benefits. Most manufacturers now include at least one prebiotic, either in the form of a human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) called 2’-Fucosyllactose (2’-FL) or in fiber-based forms called fructooligosaccharides or galactooligosaccharides. But there is little evidence that prebiotics added to formula are helpful. Bode and pediatricians Anthony Porto and Jenny Thomas all cautioned that the few prebiotics currently added to formula haven’t been proven to affect a baby’s gut microflora and immune system the same way the many dozens of unique prebiotics found in human milk do.
  • Probiotics are included in some formulas, or you can add your own when mixing formula ( Gerber , Enfamil , and others sell infant probiotics). Porto cautioned to add probiotics only after consulting your child’s pediatrician. The beneficial bacteria found in human milk, Lactobacillus reuteri , has been shown to reduce colic-related gas in human-milk-fed babies. But one study did not find the same effect when babies were fed formula that included the bacteria, and separate studies found limited benefits to using other bacterias. Porto said that one of the best things you can do for a baby’s gut flora is “limiting the use of antibiotics, especially during the first few years of life.”

Though the FDA recognizes all these additives as safe, a 2017 article on infant nutrition in Pediatrics in Review concluded: “The benefits of these additives are still under investigation.” Research into human milk is ongoing. And the makeup, role, and benefits of many of human milk’s bioactive components , like white blood cells, immunological proteins, beneficial microbes (probiotics), and prebiotics, among many others, are still being understood.

“We have come ages in formula development. But [formula makers] are nowhere close to creating human milk,” Thomas said. “I don’t think that any of the newest additions to formula makes any one formula so great that you should stand up and say this is the one that you need.”

Following the guidance of these experts and other medical sources, we considered these formula “extras” to be just that: safe to consume, maybe nice to have, but not yet conclusively beneficial. These ingredients are one of the reasons the cost of formulas can vary so widely, but Young said you don’t need to stretch your budget for them.

And when it comes to formula companies touting certain ingredients as improving babies’ development or cognition, Young tells parents to be skeptical. “Talk to your baby, make eye contact with your baby, snuggle with your baby, read to your child,” she says. “All of those things together make such a bigger impact that there’s just no room for parents to feel any guilt if a formula is out of their financial reach.”

Six containers of baby formulas, stacked together with their ingredient lists facing the camera.

There is a dizzyingly long list of potential ingredients in formula, and understanding the label isn’t easy. Many of the ingredients that fulfill the FDA-required vitamins and minerals have complex names (“iron” might be listed as “ferrous sulfate”). And a formula might proclaim it “contains DHA” on the front, but to find it on the ingredients list, you’d need to know that DHA often comes from Crypthecodinium cohnii oil. Here, we’ve listed the FDA-required ingredients you’ll find in all US formulas.

Required nutrients, vitamins and minerals

We’ve also listed other common minerals and prebiotics, as well as other ingredients added to formulas. These “extras” are not required by the FDA, but they are all considered safe. Formula companies add these ingredients because they may confer potential benefits or are designed to make the formula more similar to human milk. And some ingredients act as emulsifiers or thickeners for the formula’s consistency.

DHA and ARA

Alpha-lactalbumin, beta-carotene, lactoferrin, l-carnitine, milk fat globule membrane (mfgm), nucleotides, non-nutritive ingredients.

Infant formula is one of the most highly regulated foods, and manufacturers are required to test samples of each batch of formula for Cronobacter and Salmonella , bacteria that can contaminate dry foods like powdered formula and can make infants, especially newborns, sick. Recalls due to potential pathogens are rare, but they do happen, and sometimes recalls happen for other reasons (such as things ending up in the formula that don’t belong there).

Though potentially harmful bacteria can sometimes come from powdered infant formulas, they can also be introduced during the process of preparing formula and feeding a baby. To minimize the risk, the CDC recommends sterilizing bottles and the feeding parts (such as the nipples), as well as washing your hands thoroughly before preparing formula or feeding.

For at-risk babies (those who are under 3 months old or are immunocompromised), the CDC and the World Health Organization recommend using premixed liquid formula (often called “ready to feed”) or mixing powdered formula with very hot water (158 degrees Fahrenheit), being careful to let it cool before feeding. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics says you don’t need to boil or otherwise heat the water before mixing in powdered formula, unless you are concerned about water safety. Talk to your doctor about any special instructions for preparing your baby’s formula.

All FDA-regulated infant formula sold in the US is safe and promotes normal growth and development for healthy babies from birth through 12 months. We think our picks offer the best value and meet an array of caregiver preferences. But your baby’s needs may differ, and the list below includes nearly all powdered milk-based formulas available in the US (sorted by brand, alphabetically). We’ve noted which carbohydrate(s) and extra nutrients each formula includes, but for complete information, check nutrition and ingredients labels and refer to our charts and descriptions above.

Enfamil, Similac, and Gerber offer some of their formulas in liquid concentrate (which must be diluted) and ready-to-feed versions. Ready-to-feed formulas, some of which come in 2-ounce or 8-ounce pre-portioned bottles, are the most convenient and foolproof option because they require no mixing or dilution. They are significantly more expensive than powdered formulas, though.

Enfamil traditional

Enfamil’s traditional formulas all cost more than our equivalent picks. Like our picks, all traditional Enfamil formulas have DHA and ARA, taurine, L-carnitine, and nucleotides, and many have polydextrose and galactooligosaccharides (prebiotics).

Infant : lactose; polydextrose and galactooligosaccharides; the protein from nonfat milk and whey is 60% whey and 40% casein

NeuroPro Infant : lactose; polydextrose and galactooligosaccharides; milk fat globule membrane (MFGM); the protein from nonfat milk and whey is 60% whey and 40% casein

Enspire Optimum : lactose; polydextrose and galactooligosaccharides; lactoferrin; milk fat globule membrane (MFGM); the protein from nonfat milk and whey is 60% whey and 40% casein

Premium A2 : A2 milk; lactose; polydextrose and galactooligosaccharides; the protein from skim milk and whey is 60% whey and 40% casein

NeuroPro Sensitive : corn-syrup solids instead of lactose; milk fat globule membrane (MFGM); the protein from milk protein isolate and whey is 55% whey and 45% casein

A.R. : maltodextrin in addition to lactose; rice starch as a thickener (Young points out that there is no solid evidence that rice starch reduces painful spit-up); polydextrose and galactooligosaccharides; the protein is from nonfat milk and has no added whey

Simply Organic : lactose and maltodextrin; galactooligosaccharides; the protein is from organic nonfat milk and does not contain added whey

Enfamil partially hydrolyzed

Like our picks, the Enfamil partially hydrolyzed formulas have DHA and ARA, taurine, and L-carnitine. But they cost more.

NeuroPro Gentlease : corn-syrup solids instead of lactose; milk fat globule membrane (MFGM); the protein from partially hydrolyzed nonfat milk and whey is 70% whey and 30% casein before hydrolysis

Gentlease : corn-syrup solids instead of lactose; the protein from partially hydrolyzed nonfat milk and whey is 60% whey and 40% casein before hydrolysis

Enspire Gentlease : corn-syrup solids instead of lactose; lactoferrin; milk fat globule membrane (MFGM); the protein from partially hydrolyzed nonfat milk and whey is 75% whey and 25% casein before hydrolysis

Reguline : corn-syrup solids and lactose; polydextrose and galactooligosaccharides; the protein from partially hydrolyzed nonfat milk and whey is 60% whey and 40% casein before hydrolysis

Enfamil fully hydrolyzed

Nutramigen : hypoallergenic formula that contains fully hydrolyzed proteins and is meant for babies with milk intolerance and/or allergy

Gerber formulas all include DHA and ARA, taurine, nucleotides, and L-carnitine. Until fairly recently, the proteins in all Gerber formulas were partially hydrolyzed, but now only the Pro versions are partially hydrolyzed. They all contain 2’-O-Fucosyllactose (2’-FL) as a prebiotic, and either B. lactis or L. reuteri as probiotics. Again, they cost more than our picks.

Gerber Good Start Gentle : lactose and maltodextrin; 2’-FL (prebiotic), B. lactis cultures (probiotic); the protein from whey and nonfat milk is 70% whey and 30% casein

Gerber Good Start GentlePro Stage 1 and GentlePro Stage 2 : lactose and maltodextrin; 2’-FL (prebiotic), B. lactis cultures (probiotic); the protein from hydrolyzed whey is 100% whey (no casein)

Gerber Good Start Gentle Supreme (formerly Good Start A2) : A2 milk; lactose; 2’-FL (prebiotic), L. reuteri cultures (probiotic); the protein from nonfat A2 milk and whey is 70% whey and 30% casein

Gerber Good Start SoothePro : maltodextrin instead of lactose; 2’-FL (prebiotic), L. reuteri cultures (probiotic); protein is hydrolyzed and is 100% whey (no casein)

Gerber Extensive HA : hypoallergenic formula that contains fully hydrolyzed proteins and is meant for babies with milk intolerance and/or allergy

Similac traditional

Similac traditional formulas cost more than our picks, and some use other sugars instead of lactose (which our experts preferred since lactose best models human milk). All traditional Similac formulas have DHA and ARA, lutein, taurine, L-carnitine, and nucleotides. They also contain a prebiotic in the form of 2’-Fucosyllactose (2’-FL), fructooligosaccharides, and/or galactooligosaccharides. None of Similac’s formulas contain palm oil.

Advance : lactose; lycopene; galactooligosaccharides; protein from nonfat milk and whey is 48% whey and 52% casein

Pro-Advance : lactose; 2’-FL and fructooligosaccharides; protein from nonfat milk and whey is 48% whey and 52% casein

Organic : sucrose, maltodextrin, and lactose; lycopene; fructooligosaccharides; this formula does not have added whey, only nonfat milk, making the protein 18% whey and 82% casein

Pure Bliss : lactose; galactooligosaccharides; formula is made from milk from grass-fed cows; the protein from nonfat milk and whey is 48% whey and 52% casein

360 Total Care : lactose; five prebiotics (2’-Fucosyllactose, lacto-N-tetraose, 3-Fucosyllactose, 6’-Sialyllactose, 3’-Sialyllactose); the protein from nonfat milk and whey is 48% whey and 52% casein

360 Total Care Sensitive : corn syrup; five prebiotics (2’-Fucosyllactose, lacto-N-tetraose, 3-Fucosyllactose, 6’-Sialyllactose, 3’-Sialyllactose); the protein from milk protein isolate is 18% whey and 82% casein

Sensitive : corn-syrup solids instead of lactose; lycopene; galactooligosaccharides; this formula does not have added whey, and it uses milk protein isolate as the protein source, making the protein 18% whey and 82% casein

Pro-Sensitive: corn-syrup solids instead of lactose; lycopene, 2’-FL, and fructooligosaccharides; this formula does not have added whey, and uses milk protein isolate as the protein source, making the protein 18% whey and 82% casein

For Supplementation : marketed as a formula for babies who are also fed human milk, but it meets the same criteria as all formulas; it has lactose, galactooligosaccharides, and lycopene, and the protein is 48% whey and 52% casein

Similac partially hydrolyzed

Total Comfort : maltodextrin instead of lactose; lycopene; galactooligosaccharides; the protein is 100% partially hydrolyzed whey (no casein)

Pro-Total Comfort : maltodextrin instead of lactose; lycopene; 2’-FL; the protein is 100% partially hydrolyzed whey (no casein)

Similac fully hydrolyzed

Alimentum : hypoallergenic formula that contains fully hydrolyzed proteins and is meant for babies with milk intolerance and/or allergy

More traditional formulas

Aptamil First Infant Milk Stage 1 is an imported milk-based formula from the parent company Danone that contains lactose as the primary carbohydrate. It contains two probiotics (galactooligosaccharides and fructooligosaccharides), it does not contain palm or soy oil, and the protein comes from skimmed milk powder and whey powder. Stage 1 can be used for babies 0 to 12 months. If you choose this formula, it’s important to note that the mixing instructions are different than most US formulas: mix one scoop of powder with one ounce of water (most US formulas are one scoop for two ounces of water). Always use the scoop that comes with the formula.

Bubs Supreme Infant Formula Stage 1 (and Stage 2 ) is made from A2 milk; the carbohydrate is primarily in the form of lactose. It contains two prebiotics (galactooligosaccharides and fructooligosaccharides), it contains soy oil but no palm oil, and the protein is from whey protein and A2 whole milk (making the whey-to-casein ratio 60 to 40). It has more DHA (24 mg per 100 calories) than many formulas. Stage 1 can be used up to 12 months, Stage 2 is only for babies over six months.

Kendamil Stage 1 is made with whole milk and has carbohydrates in the form of lactose, plus a prebiotic (galactooligosaccharides). It has no soy or palm oils, and it contains protein from whole milk, nonfat milk, and whey protein (making this formula’s protein 60% whey and 40% casein). Stage 1 can be used for babies up to 12 months. This formula is similar to our pick, Aussie Bubs Organic Grass Fed Stage 1 , and may be a good choice if you’re looking for a less expensive non-organic whole milk formula. If you choose this formula, note that the mixing instructions are different than most US formulas: mix one scoop of powder with one ounce of water (most US formulas are one scoop for two ounces of water) and always only use the scoop that comes with the formula.

Mama Bear Sensitivity Premium is made by Perrigo, and it is also sold as Up & Up Sensitivity, CVS Health Sensitivity, Aldi Little Journey Sensitivity, and Member’s Mark Sensitivity, among other store brands. It contains corn-syrup solids and sucrose instead of lactose, and the protein comes from milk protein isolate with no added whey.

Nestlé NAN SupremePro 1 is a milk-based formula that contains lactose as the primary carbohydrate plus two prebiotics (human milk oligosaccharides): 2’-Fucosyllactose (2’-FL) and lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT). The protein is from hydrolyzed whey. The types of vegetable oils are not disclosed on the packaging.

Up & Up Complete Comfort Premium , manufactured by Perrigo, is also sold under other store brands as “Complete Comfort” formulas. It is similar to Similac Pro-Total Comfort—both contain corn maltodextrin as the main carbohydrate, partially hydrolyzed whey as the source of protein, and 2’-FL as a prebiotic, and neither contains palm oil.

More organic formulas

Baby's Only Organic Premium Infant Formula is currently the most affordable organic formula available. It has lactose as its only carbohydrate, and it includes added whey. It does not contain palm oil. It also does not contain many other commonly added ingredients like DHA, ARA, lutein, taurine, L-carnitine, nucleotides, and a prebiotic or probiotic. We were surprised that it forgoes DHA, which is found in human milk, and is required in European formulas. Though DHA is not currently required by the FDA, the experts we spoke with say choosing a formula with some DHA may be a good idea.

Bellamy’s Organic Infant Formula Step 1 (and Step 2 ) is an organic-milk-based formula with carbohydrates primarily in the form of lactose. It has a prebiotic (galactooligosaccharides), it contains palm and soy oils, and the protein is from whole and nonfat milk plus whey.

Bobbie Organic , manufactured by Perrigo, fashions itself as a “European-style” formula. It’s made from grass fed organic milk, lactose is the sole carbohydrate, and the formula has added whey (making the protein ratio 60% whey and 40% casein). Bobbie’s blend of oils contains coconut, sunflower or safflower, and canola oils; it has no palm oil. Bobbie contains more DHA (at 20 mg per 100 calories) than any other formula available in the US, aligning with European standards, according to a Bobbie spokesperson. This formula lacks some added ingredients that many other US formulas have, but they are ingredients that many European formulas leave out (a prebiotic, lutein, nucleotides, beta-carotene, and taurine). Like ByHeart and Aussie Bubs, Bobbie is also Clean Label Project certified . Bobbie costs about $1.75 per powdered ounce at Target, making it one of the most expensive organic formulas.

Bobbie Organic Gentle is much like its original formula in many ways, except that the protein is entirely from hydrolyzed whey. And it is the only hydrolyzed, or “gentle,” formula available whose carbohydrate is entirely lactose.

ByHeart , which manufactures its own formula, produces one of the handful of formulas available in the US made with whole milk (ByHeart Whole Nutrition Infant Formula is made with grass-fed organic whole milk), which naturally contains milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), an ingredient added to some formulas. The other ingredient that makes ByHeart’s formula unique is alpha-lactalbumin, which is a prominent protein in human milk, but isn’t found in other formulas. Lactose is the sole carbohydrate, and it has added hydrolyzed whey, making the protein ratio 80% whey and 20% casein. ByHeart contains DHA at a level that is higher than in many of the most common formulas in the US (18 mg/100 calories), it also includes a prebiotic (galactooligosaccharides). This formula leaves out some ingredients commonly added to US formulas, such as nucleotides, beta-carotene, and taurine (beta-carotene and taurine are naturally found in the milk used in many US formulas). It also lacks palm oil and contains lower levels of iron than many US formulas (though it’s still within the FDA’s requirements). It’s also Clean Label Project certified , which means the company tests for concerning chemicals, including heavy metals, pesticides, and plasticizers. Though we like some of the ways this formula stands out, it has had availability issues in the past.

Earth’s Best Organic Dairy Infant Formula has lactose as its only carbohydrate, and it includes added whey (making this formula’s protein 30% whey and 70% casein), as well as the extra nutrients DHA and ARA, lutein, taurine, L-carnitine, nucleotides, and a prebiotic (fructooligosaccharides). It contains palm oil. Previously a pick in this guide, Earth’s Best remains a great choice, but at the time of publication it was more expensive on a per-ounce basis when compared with Aussie Bubs .

Earth’s Best Organic Low Lactose Sensitivity has corn-syrup solids as the main carbohydrate, and the protein sources are organic milk proteins and whey proteins. It also contains palm oil.

Earth’s Best Organic Gentle contains partially hydrolyzed whey proteins, but it also contains intact proteins (in the nonfat milk), which, according to Young , counters the benefits that the partially broken-down proteins could offer. It also contains maltodextrin in addition to lactose, as well as palm oil.

Happy Baby Organic relies on lactose and contains two prebiotics (fructooligosaccharides and galactooligosaccharides), as well as DHA and ARA, and the protein is from organic nonfat milk and whey (making its protein 30% whey and 70% casein). It contains palm oil.

Happy Baby Sensitive is an organic reduced-lactose formula with maltodextrin and corn-syrup solids as the main carbohydrates. It contains palm oil, and the protein is from organic nonfat milk and whey.

Kendamil Organic Stage 1 is from a UK-based brand that has been in business for nearly 60 years and was brought to the US market during the formula shortage of 2022, and it is here to stay. This formula is one of the few made with organic whole milk and has carbohydrates in the form of lactose, plus a prebiotic (galactooligosaccharides). It has no soy or palm oils, and it contains protein from organic whole milk, organic nonfat milk, and organic whey protein (making this formula’s protein 60% whey and 40% casein). This formula is similar to our pick, Aussie Bubs Organic Grass Fed Stage 1 , however, it may be a bit more expensive depending on where you purchase them. Kendamil also has more DHA than Aussie Bubs (20 mg versus 4.43 mg per 100 calories). If you choose this formula, keep in mind that the mixing instructions are different from most US formulas: mix one scoop of powder with 1 ounce of water (most US formulas are one scoop for 2 ounces of water). It’s important to always use the scoop that comes with the formula.

Parent’s Choice Organic (also sold under other store brands, and as Amazon’s Mama Bear Organic ) is comparable to Similac Organic. Like Similac Organic, these generics contain sugars in addition to lactose as carbohydrates, plus fructooligosaccharides as a prebiotic; the protein is from organic nonfat milk and has no added whey. Unlike Similac formulas, these store brands have palm oil. At 80¢ an ounce, Parent’s Choice Organic is cheaper than our organic pick , but because lactose is not the sole carbohydrate in this formula, it did not make our top picks.

Up & Up Gentle , which is manufactured by Perrigo, is also sold as Parent’s Choice Gentle, CVS Health Gentle, Aldi Little Journey Gentle, Member’s Mark Gentle, and Amazon’s Mama Bear Gentle, among others. This formula contains intact proteins (in the nonfat milk) in addition to partially hydrolyzed whey proteins, which would negate any benefits the broken-down proteins might have. It also contains corn syrup as the main carbohydrate.

Enfamil, Gerber, Similac, Perrigo Nutrition, Kabrita, Else, Serenity Kids, LittleOak, Baby’s Only, and a few other companies also produce toddler formula, or toddler milk, which is marketed for babies older than a year. Toddler formula is not regulated by the FDA in the same way infant formula is, and it is not meant for babies younger than 1 year old. When choosing formula for an infant under 1 year old, always be sure that the formula label specifies “infant formula.”

For babies over a year old, toddler formula is unnecessary. There is no evidence that toddler formula is better than whole cow’s milk for growth and development for babies older than a year. In fact, the AAP says toddler formulas are not only unnecessary but could be harmful to young children, because they contain extra sugars compared with whole cow’s milk. Toddler formulas are significantly more expensive than cow’s milk. If you have questions about nutrition for older babies, talk to a pediatrician.

Courtney Schley contributed reporting in 2017 and 2018.

This article was edited by Tracy Vence and Kalee Thompson.

Bridget Young, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and founder of BabyFormulaExpert.com , phone interview, February 9, 2018, September 30, 2020, and March 1, 2022

Anthony Porto, MD, pediatric gastroenterologist and pediatrics professor at Yale University , phone interview, February 21, 2018, October 16, 2020, February 22, 2022, and April 3, 2023

Jenny Thomas, MD, pediatrician and breastfeeding medicine specialist , phone interview , March 8, 2018

Lars Bode, PhD, professor of pediatrics at the University of California San Diego Medical School and director of the Bode Lab , phone interview , March 9, 2018

Laura Modi, CEO and co-founder of Bobbie , phone interviews, October 26, 2020, and May 24, 2022

Ron Belldegrun, CEO and co-founder of ByHeart , phone interview , May 13, 2022

Kristy Carr, founder and CEO of Aussie Bubs , phone interview , June 7, 2022

Grace J. Ahern, et al., Advances in Infant Formula Science , Annual Review of Food Science and Technology, March 2019

The National Academies Press, Institute of Medicine , Infant Formula: Evaluating the Safety of New Ingredients, 2004

Camilia R. Martin, et al., Review of Infant Feeding: Key Features of Breast Milk and Infant Formula , Nutrients , May 1, 2016

Dina M. DiMaggio, et al., Updates in Infant Nutrition , Pediatrics in Review , October 1, 2017

Tracy P. Milbrandt, MD, Standard Infant Formula and Formula Feeding—Cow Milk Protein Formulas , Pediatrics in Review , May 1, 2017

Tracy P. Milbrandt, MD, Specialized Infant Formulas , Pediatrics in Review , May 1, 2017

Lars Bode, PhD, Human milk oligosaccharides: every baby needs a sugar mama , Glycobiology , September 1, 2012

Meet your guide

A headshot of Christina Szalinski

Christina Szalinski

Christina Szalinski is a freelance science writer with a PhD in cell biology.

Further reading

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F lying with a baby adds a layer of complication and planning – but that doesn't mean you can't make it work. To help the trip go as smoothly as possible, book a seat for your baby, plan for the security screening, and pack wisely for you and your little one. For everything even the most seasoned travelers need to know about air travel with a baby , read on.

How old does a baby need to be to fly?

Planning a flight with a newborn? There isn't an official age requirement for air travel, but airlines have varying policies. Some (such as Alaskan Airlines) have no minimum age to fly; others (American Airlines, JetBlue) say babies can fly as young as two or three days old; and still others (Delta, United, Spirit, Frontier) allow babies on board after the first week of life.

Less commonly, airlines will require infants to be slightly older. Southwest, for example, says children must be at least 14 days old for an international flight. Check with your airline to confirm their policy before booking a ticket for your little one.

However, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) discourages parents from flying with a baby too soon after birth. With their delicate immune systems, newborns have a heightened risk of contracting an infectious disease on a plane. That's especially true if your baby was born prematurely or has a condition such as a chronic heart problem that makes them more vulnerable.

Always discuss your travel plans with your pediatrician and ask what they recommend. Depending on your baby's age and your destination, they might suggest an extra dose of certain vaccines .

Do babies fly free?

Babies and toddlers under 2 years old aren't legally required to occupy an airplane seat and can instead travel as a "lap infant" on their parent's ticket. Lap infants are generally free of charge, although you may pay a percentage of the full fare if you're traveling internationally .

Even though you don't officially need to purchase a ticket for your under-2-year-old, leading experts agree that it's much safer to buy an airplane seat for your baby. That's because a baby held in your arms is nowhere near as secure as they'd be buckled into an approved child restraint system should the plane encounter turbulence.

Unrestrained children are the leading cause of pediatric injuries on an airplane, and lap infants have tragically been killed during even moderate turbulence. Although it can be upsetting to think about, human arms are simply not strong enough to hold a child in these events. That's why the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) , and the  National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) all strongly urge parents to purchase an airplane seat for young children.

If you book a seat for your baby or toddler, bring an FAA-approved child restraint on board to strap them in safely. You can use a car seat on a plane (make sure it's approved for both motor vehicles and aircraft) or AmSafe's Child Aviation Restraint System (CARES) device .

Although it can be tough to swallow the additional cost, a baby or toddler in their own seat has other benefits in addition to safety: They're more comfortable during the flight, easier to manage, and more likely to fall asleep, many parents find.

What do babies need to fly?

This depends a little on your child's age, the airline you're flying, and whether you're traveling within the United States or internationally.

For domestic travel, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) doesn't require children under 18 to provide identification. However, it's still smart to check your airline's identification requirements. Some (JetBlue, Alaska Airlines) may ask for an infant's proof of age for domestic flights, which could be a birth certificate, passport, or immunization record.

Other airlines, such as Southwest, might not ask for proof of age but may require you to have a boarding verification document printed for your infant from the ticket counter even if they aren't occupying their own seat. When in doubt, it doesn't hurt to have some extra documentation for your baby just in case.

If you're flying internationally, your baby will need a passport regardless of their age. And if your baby is flying internationally with just one parent, you might be asked to show a letter of consent.

15 tips for flying with a baby

1. check in with your airline.

Regardless of whether you're flying with a lap infant or purchasing a seat for your baby, it's worth connecting with the airline ahead of time to discuss your seating options. A few things to consider bringing up with the agent:

If you're going the lap infant route : Ask the airline if there's an option to reserve a seat in a row with a skycot. These onboard bassinets are designed for babies 6 months and younger and provide a place for your baby to lie down flat during the flight (though you will need to pick them up whenever the seatbelt sign is on, as well as during takeoff and landing). Also confirm whether there are any rules about how many lap infants are permitted per row or section. Alaska Airlines, for example, has a policy stipulating where lap infants can sit on certain aircrafts.

If you're booking your baby their own seat and bringing a car seat : Some airlines require that car seats be placed next to a window so they don't block other passengers. A bulkhead row can also be nice to request when traveling with a car seat since it provides extra legroom. Just keep in mind that in the bulkhead row, it's sometimes trickier to access bags that might contain diapers, milk, and anything else you might need. Because there's no seat in front of you to stash your personal item under, you'll likely be asked to place it in the overhead compartment.

2. Ask whether your child is eligible to earn points

When booking a seat for your child, look into the airline's loyalty program. Some, though not all, will allow children to earn points that you can use towards future travel. Take  JetBlue , which lets parents enroll children 13 and younger in their TrueBlue account. You can then combine points earned within the family through the airline's Points Pooling program.

3. Confirm that your car seat is FAA-approved

If you've bought an airplane seat for your baby, bring an FAA-approved car seat for your child. This is the safest way for babies to fly, plus it ensures you'll have a car seat for your baby at your destination. It's likely that your child's existing car seat is approved for airline travel, but check the product manual or look for a label that says "This restraint is certified for use in motor vehicles and aircraft" to make sure.

If you didn't buy a ticket for your baby, you might get lucky and be able to use the car seat if there are empty seats on board, but there are no guarantees with this approach.

4. Consider your stroller strategy

If you're traveling with a baby or toddler, chances are good that you'll be bringing your stroller along, too. Families have three options when flying with a stroller:

Check it at the ticket counter: If you want a stroller at your destination but don't need it in the airport, you can check it along with your baggage when you arrive. (Note that some airlines always require you to check a stroller at the ticket counter if it weighs over a certain amount.) A stroller usually doesn't count towards your checked baggage, and many airlines allow families to check one stroller and one car seat per child for no extra cost. If you do check a stroller when you arrive at the airport, you may want to use a baby carrier to get your baby to your gate.

Gate-check your full-size stroller: The benefit of gate-checking a stroller is that you have it with you while navigating the airport, which many families find helpful. Waiting in a long security line or racing to the gate with a small child in tow is often much easier with the support of a stroller. Plus, you can use the stroller's storage basket to stash some of your stuff. The downside is that you'll have to wait for your stroller to be unloaded once you arrive, which can slightly prolong the process of getting out of the airport.

Bring along a stroller that will fit in the overhead bin: If you'd prefer not to gate-check your stroller, consider investing in a lightweight travel stroller. Some are compact enough to fit in most overhead compartments when collapsed (though you can check your airline's carry-on bag size guidelines to be sure). Their smaller size can be convenient for travel, and it's also nice not to have to wait for a gate-checked stroller to be brought back up when you land.

5. Look into your baggage options

Airlines have different baggage policies, but call ahead of time to understand exactly what you can bring on board. For example, while lap infants are generally not entitled to their own carry-on bags, many airlines allow families traveling with a child to bring a diaper bag, a breast pump , a cooler bag for milk or formula, an FAA-approved car seat, and a compact stroller onboard in addition to the regular carry-on and personal item allowance.

6. Pack smart

Packing for a flight with a baby is an art form: You need to have access to all the essentials, but you also don't want to overpack and have to rummage through a big bag to find something you need.

Consider what you'll want to have access to during the flight and pack your bags accordingly. For example, it's helpful to have a bag with diapers, wipes, disposable changing mats, disposable diaper bags, and a change of clothes at easy reach. For more ideas, check out our suggested packing list for traveling with a baby .

Definitely pack more spare clothes for your baby than you'll think you'll need – and include a fresh shirt for yourself. Nothing is worse than a blowout on an airplane! (Here's how to handle a blowout or change a diaper on a plane .)

7. Be ready for flight delays and cancellations

When you're traveling with your little one, the last thing you want to deal with is getting stuck at the airport. But it happens, so be prepared. Bring more than enough diapers, formula, and snacks in your carry-on bags, as well as a few changes of clothes for your baby (and perhaps a change of clothes for you, too). Flight delays and cancellations can make it difficult to get your checked luggage, so you want to have the essentials with you. 

In the same vein, consider gate checking your car seat and stroller (rather than checking them at the ticket counter) so you can easily get them back if needed.

8. Plan ahead to bring formula, breast milk, and bottles

Thankfully, not all the TSA rules about traveling with liquids apply to you. Parents are permitted to bring greater volumes of breast milk or formula through security.

Review your airline's policies for bringing formula or breast milk on board and hand it to security officers when you go through screening. You don't need to put bottles into the standard quart-size zip-top bag.

To speed up the process, TSA recommends storing either breast milk or formula in clear, translucent bottles rather than plastic bags or pouches, which may be subject to additional screening. And if you pack all the bottles in a cooler bag, know that most airlines won't count it towards your personal item allowance.

Breast pumps are often considered medically necessary, and ice packs, freezer packs, and other cooling accessories are allowed in your carry-on bags. You can bring all of these items on board even if your child isn't traveling with you.

9. Pack formula safely …

When traveling with baby formula, keep these safe storage tips in mind:

Ready-to-feed formula: Bring an unopened container and clean, empty bottles on board. When your baby is ready for feeding, pour the formula into the bottle and serve it right away.

Powdered formula: Fill bottle(s) with clean water, and bring a small container of powdered formula and a scoop with you on the plane. You can measure, shake, and serve a bottle to your baby when they're ready for a feeding.

Premade bottles: You can also bring premade bottles through security if you prefer, using a cooler to keep them cold. Just keep in mind that if the cooler doesn't keep bottles at 35 to 40 degrees, you'll need to use or refrigerate them within two hours.

10. … and breast milk, too

A cooler will be essential if you're bringing breast milk on a plane. You can pack breast milk in bottles or pre-sterilized, sealable storage bags in a cooler bag, then offer them to your baby on the plane.

Breast milk will stay fresh for 24 hours in a cooler with frozen ice packs. At room temperature, breast milk is good for four hours; in the refrigerator, for four days; and frozen, for up to 12 months, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) . 

11. Bring plenty of snacks

If your little one has started solids , pack baby-friendly foods for your flight. Containers with pre-chopped fruit, steamed veggies, tofu, and crackers are all easy choices. Know that you're also allowed to bring puree pouches through security, as the TSA considers them medically necessary liquids. And make sure to include snacks for yourself, too!

12. Consider whether you want to board early

Most airlines allow families to pre-board. But there are two schools of thought on how to approach boarding with kids: Some families relish the chance to locate their seats early and settle in, while others find it difficult to entertain young children on an airplane that's not moving as other passengers also try to get settled.

If you're traveling with your partner or a loved one, you might decide to split up, with one adult boarding early with the bags while the other lets the kids run around a bit longer by the gate.

13. Bring entertainment for older babies

Younger infants may be mostly content to sleep, eat, and snuggle their parents, but older babies and toddlers can be trickier to keep occupied on an airplane. At this stage, kids are learning how to pull up to a stand and walk , or else have recently mastered these skills and are eager to explore an exciting new environment.

While you don't need to pack tons of toys, a few new items can help hold their attention. Some ideas: a slinky, painter's tape, small board books, coloring books and crayons, and stickers. You can also try classic car games like "I Spy" and "Rock, Paper, Scissors."

14. Take steps to fight jet lag

If you're crossing time zones, try shifting your baby's sleep schedule over a few days leading up to your departure and exposing them to sunlight once you reach your destination. Or, you may want to keep the same schedule in the new time zone if that works best for you. Here are more tips for handling time changes with a baby .

15. Prepare for pressure changes

If your baby's ears seem to hurt from air pressure changes during takeoff and landing, encourage them to breastfeed or suck on a bottle, pacifier , or sippy cup. If your baby's strapped into a car seat, give them something to suck on while in their seat rather than taking them out to breastfeed. It's safest for both of you to be securely buckled in.

Not all babies experience ear pain when flying, so use your judgment. If your baby's sleeping soundly, leave them be and they might get through the takeoff or landing without any trouble.

Flying with a baby: 15 tips for an easier trip

Diapers and baby formula are hard to find in Gaza, leaving parents desperate

Medics prepare premature babies for transport to Egypt after they were evacuated from Shifa Hospital in Gaza City.

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Zainab al Zein was forced to make a desperate decision: Feed her infant daughter solid foods that her tiny body may not be able to digest or watch her starve because of a lack of baby formula in the besieged Gaza Strip.

Al Zein chose to give 2½-month-old Linda solids, knowing the choice could lead to health issues.

“I know we are doing something harmful to her, but there is nothing,” said al-Zein, feeding her wailing daughter crushed biscuits in the cold tent they now call home. “She cries and cries continuously.”

The war between Israel and Gaza’s Hamas rulers has sparked a humanitarian catastrophe that has brought shortages of the most basic necessities. Some of the hardest-hit are babies, young children and their parents, with diapers and formula either hard to find or spiking to unaffordable prices, leading parents to resort to inadequate or even unsafe alternatives.

Their plight is further complicated due to sporadic aid deliveries that have been hobbled by Israeli restrictions and the relentless fighting.

Displaced Palestinians are also being squeezed into ever tighter areas of the tiny coastal enclave, prompting outbreaks of illness and disease, to which malnourished children are particularly vulnerable. The U.N. says the population is at imminent risk of famine, with a quarter of people already starving.

Palestinians try to extinguish a fire at a building of an UNRWA vocational training center which displaced people use as a shelter, after being targeted by Israeli tank shill in Khan Younis, southern Gaza Strip, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Ramez Habboub)

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For Palestinians enduring increasingly dire conditions, the most basic of acts — such as changing a child’s diaper — have become a luxury that can require sacrifice.

“I sold my children’s food so I can buy diapers,” said Raafat Abu Wardeh, who has two children in diapers.

Aid is not reaching everyone, and shortages of basic goods have caused prices to skyrocket. With Gaza’s economy decimated, few Palestinians have regular incomes and most are either depleting their savings or subsisting on handouts.

At makeshift street stalls, older children working as hawkers sell individual diapers for three to five shekels ($1 to $1.50) or entire packs for up to 170 shekels ($46). A pack of diapers before the war cost 12 shekels ($3.50).

“The prices of diapers are very ridiculous,” said Anis al-Zein, who was buying them along a street in central Deir al Balah and is not related to Zainab. “A child costs you 20 shekels [$5] a day. Especially in a bad situation like this, all prices are high and there is no income for people. There isn’t even aid.”

JENIN CAMP, OCCUPIED WEST BANK -- JANUARY 31, 2024: A family member shows a video of Basel Al-Ghazzawi, who is partially paralyzed get help from a nurse, in an undated video before Basel was shot and killed alongside his brother Mohammad and a friend Mohammad Jalamna by Israeli agents disguised as medical staff, after they entered the Ibn Sina hospital on Jan 30th, to shoot and kill all three at close range in Jenin Camp, Occupied West Bank , Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2024. Israel celebrated the strike, which it said OneutralizedO a terrorist cell that had taken cover at the medical facility in order to plan an attack. But the raid on Ibn Sina hospital in the embattled West Bank city of Jenin has raised new questions about Israel's war conduct N and in particular its willingness to target civilian medical facilities. Israel is already under scrutiny as the International Court of Justice weighs a case alleging it violated the genocide convention in its ongoing assault on the Gaza Strip, where Israel has frequently targeted schools and hospitals in what it is says is an attempt to root out Hamas fighters. Several legal experts said it's likely that Tuesday's hospital attack violated international laws governing conduct during war, including one that prohibits combatants from posing as doctors or other civilians, and another that bars the killing of adversaries who have been wounded or incapacitated. They pointed out, too, that because Israel may not technically be at war in the West Bank, the killings could be considered as extrajudicial assassinations. (MARCUS YAM / LOS ANGELES TIMES)

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Experts say Israel’s deadly raid on a West Bank hospital may have violated international laws, including a ban on combatants posing as doctors or civilians.

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Some parents are using cloth diapers, but those require washing with water, which is also scarce.

Mohammed al Khatib, the local program manager for the U.K.-based Medical Aid for Palestinians, said some people have been forced to buy smaller diapers and tape them together.

Lack of fresh produce, the proliferation of unregulated food stalls and cold weather has contributed to the spread of illness, including respiratory infections, skin rashes and diarrhea. “It is winter, and the kids are wet most of the time,” al-Khatib said.

The war, triggered by the deadly Oct. 7 Hamas assault on southern Israel, has unleashed unimaginable destruction, with more than 27,000 Palestinians killed and close to 67,000 wounded in Israel’s offensive, according to local health officials.

The Health Ministry in Hamas-run Gaza does not differentiate in its count between civilians and combatants but says two-thirds of those killed were women and children. Israel blames Hamas for the high death toll because the group carries out attacks and militant activities in residential areas.

JERUSALEM, ISRAEL -- JANUARY 24, 2024: Protesters raise awareness for hostages in Gaza and cause a traffic congestion, in Jerusalem, Israel, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2024. (MARCUS YAM / LOS ANGELES TIMES)

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The Hamas attack killed about 1,200 people in Israel, most of them civilians, and roughly 250 were taken hostage.

The lack of diapers has added to the poor sanitary conditions for the estimated 1.7 million displaced Palestinians, many of whom are crammed into overcrowded shelters.

The United Nations’ children’s agency UNICEF said this week that most of the newly displaced have only 1-2 liters (50-67 ounces) of water a day to drink, cook and wash. It said chronic diarrhea among children was ticking up.

UNICEF says aid deliveries into Gaza are not meeting the vast needs.

The agency estimates 20,000 infants up to 6 months old need formula, which UNICEF has been delivering along with necessities that have also included diapers and cash.

“This is far from being enough to address the colossal needs of the children in Gaza,” said UNICEF spokesperson Ammar Ammar.

The needs of infants are part of a broader threat to all 335,000 children in Gaza under 5 years old, who are at high risk of severe malnutrition and preventable death, UNICEF said.

“For many families in Gaza, the threat of dying from hunger is already real,” Ammar said.

The U.N. humanitarian office said Wednesday that recent screenings show that nearly 10% of children under the age of 5 suffer from acute malnutrition, a 12-fold increase from before the war. The rate is even higher in northern Gaza, which has been largely cut off from aid for months.

For Zainab al Zein, the difficult choice to feed her now-4-month-old baby crushed biscuits and ground rice instead of formula has meant frequent trips to the local hospital, which like Gaza’s healthcare system at large is under deep strain from the war.

Healthcare providers typically recommend parents wait until their child is 6 months old before feeding them solids. Research has found that babies who are given solid food too early are at higher risk of developing certain chronic diseases.

Rocking in an infant bouncer and swaddled in a blanket, Linda cried ceaselessly as her mother tried to feed her.

⁠“This is known, of course, as unhealthy eating, and we know that it causes her intestinal distress, bloating and colic,” said al-Zein. “What can I do?”

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Palestinian protesters demand an end to the war with Israel and call for the release of the Israeli hostages held in the Gaza Strip by the Hamas militant group, in Deir al Balah, Gaza Strip, on Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2024. Israel has said it will not end the war without a release of the more than 100 hostages, while Hamas says it will not free the hostages without a halt in the fighting. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

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Palestinians carry a wounded girl after being rescued from under the rubble of buildings that were destroyed by Israeli airstrikes in Jabaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2023. In just 25 days of war, more than 3,600 Palestinian children have been killed in Gaza, according to Gaza's Hamas-run Health Ministry. The advocacy group Save The Children says more children were killed in Gaza in October 2023 than in all conflict zones around the world combined in 2022. (AP Photo/Abed Khaled)

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Jan. 24, 2024

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Sunak is 'sad' parents are forced to water down baby formula due to costs

Sky News revealed last year the lengths some parents have to go to in order to feed their children - including watering down formula, buying it on the black market or even stealing products.

baby formula for travel

Political reporter

Tuesday 6 February 2024 12:58, UK

Baby formula

The prime minister has said it is "sad" that parents are watering down baby formula because they cannot afford to feed their children.

Sky News reported last year on measures parents have turned to after inflation spiked the cost of the powdered milk product.

This included watering down and even stealing products in order to make ends meet amid the cost of living crisis .

Follow live: Sunak responds to criticism of 'depraved bet'

Asked about the situation parents have found themselves in, Rishi Sunak told the BBC: "My job is to make sure everyone has the financial security that they want for them and their families.

"And of course, I'm sad to hear that someone's in that situation."

He added: "Of course it's sad if someone's got a little one in their lives and they're having to do that. That's an incredibly sad thing.

"But my job is to make sure that we can ease those pressures, and actually, if you look at what was causing those pressures, it was inflation: inflation being at 11%, prices going up by that much every year, it was a real struggle for people.

"That's why it was important that we prioritised bringing inflation down. It is now coming down. That is real, that will have an impact on people because it will start to ease some of those pressures."

Britain&#39;s Prime Minister Rishi Sunak gestures as he meets with Belgium&#39;s Prime Minister Alexander De Croo at Downing Street, London, Britain, January 23, 2024. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool

Inflation was still at 4% at the end of 2023 , meaning prices were still rising above the Bank of England's 2% target.

In order to reduce price growth, the Bank - which is independent of the government - has raised interest rates , putting up the cost of borrowing for consumers on loans and mortgages - also leading to increased rents.

At the time of Sky's reporting in summer 2023, the price of the cheapest brand of baby formula had increased by 45% in the previous two years.

Read more: Baby formula prices a 'catastrophe'- MP Mum feels 'attacked' over 'jaw-dropping' prices

Other brands have risen between 17% and 31% in that time period.

Regulations state that all baby formulas must meet the same standards - so the cheapest brand will provide all the same necessary nutrition as the most expensive.

As well as watering down their products, Sky News also spoke to parents who had stolen formula, bought it on the black market or substituted it with condensed milk.

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Laurence Grummer-Strawn told Sky News the government must intervene in the crisis

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baby formula for travel

World Health Organisation technical officer Laurence Grummer-Strawn previously told Sky News that companies were "exploiting" people in a "very vulnerable situation" in order to "increase the profits of these companies, and they have huge profit margins".

He called for the government to intervene "either on the price end or in ways to help those families directly".

"Lowering the prices can help these families, but it needs to be in a sustainable way," he added.

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Diapers and baby formula are hard to find in Gaza, leaving parents desperate

As the fighting between Israel and Hamas continues some parents in the Gaza Strip have resorted to desperate measures to look after their children.

FILE - Medics prepare premature babies for transport to Egypt after they were evacuated from Shifa Hospital in Gaza City to a hospital in Rafah, Gaza Strip on Nov. 20, 2023. The war in Gaza has sparked a humanitarian catastrophe that has prompted shortages of the most basic necessities. Among those hardest hit are babies, young children and their parents. That’s because diapers and formula are hard to find or have prices that are increased to unaffordable prices. Parents are looking to inadequate or even unsafe alternatives. (AP Photo/Fatima Shbair, File)

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FILE - A Palestinian woman displaced by Israeli air and ground offensive on the Gaza Strip holds her baby in a tent near Kerem Shalom crossing in Rafah on Jan. 14, 2024. The war in Gaza has sparked a humanitarian catastrophe that has prompted shortages of the most basic necessities. Among those hardest hit are babies, young children and their parents. That’s because diapers and formula are hard to find or have prices that are increased to unaffordable prices. Parents are looking to inadequate or even unsafe alternatives. (AP Photo/Hatem Ali)

FILE - A Palestinian baby wounded in Israeli bombardment of the Gaza Strip is treated in a hospital in Khan Younis on Dec. 1, 2023. The war in Gaza has sparked a humanitarian catastrophe that has prompted shortages of the most basic necessities. Among those hardest hit are babies, young children and their parents. That’s because diapers and formula are hard to find or have prices that are increased to unaffordable prices. Parents are looking to inadequate or even unsafe alternatives. (AP Photo/Fatima Shbair, File)

FILE - A Palestinian baby wounded in the Israeli bombardment of the Gaza Strip is treated in a hospital in Deir al-Balah on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2023. The war in Gaza has sparked a humanitarian catastrophe that has prompted shortages of the most basic necessities. Among those hardest hit are babies, young children and their parents. That’s because diapers and formula are hard to find or have prices that are increased to unaffordable prices. Parents are looking to inadequate or even unsafe alternatives. (AP Photo/Hatem Moussa, File)

FILE- Premature babies are prepared for transport to Egypt after they were evacuated from Shifa Hospital in Gaza City to a hospital in Rafah, Gaza Strip on Nov. 20, 2023. The war in Gaza has sparked a humanitarian catastrophe that has prompted shortages of the most basic necessities. Among those hardest hit are babies, young children and their parents. That’s because diapers and formula are hard to find or have prices that are increased to unaffordable prices. Parents are looking to inadequate or even unsafe alternatives. (AP Photo/Fatima Shbair, File)

DEIR AL-BALAH, Gaza Strip (AP) — Zainab al-Zein was forced to make a desperate decision: Feed her infant daughter solid foods that her tiny body may not be able to digest or watch her starve because of a lack of baby formula in the besieged Gaza Strip.

Al-Zein chose to give 2 1/2-month-old Linda solids, knowing the choice could lead to health issues.

“I know we are doing something harmful to her, but there is nothing,” said al-Zein, feeding her wailing daughter crushed biscuits in the cold tent they now call home. “She cries and cries continuously.”

The war between Israel and Gaza’s Hamas rulers has sparked a humanitarian catastrophe that has brought shortages of the most basic necessities. Some of the hardest-hit are babies, young children and their parents, with diapers and formula either hard to find or spiking to unaffordable prices, leading parents to resort to inadequate or even unsafe alternatives.

FILE- Premature babies are prepared for transport to Egypt after they were evacuated from Shifa Hospital in Gaza City to a hospital in Rafah, Gaza Strip on Nov. 20, 2023. The war in Gaza has sparked a humanitarian catastrophe that has prompted shortages of the most basic necessities. Among those hardest hit are babies, young children and their parents. That's because diapers and formula are hard to find or have prices that are increased to unaffordable prices. Parents are looking to inadequate or even unsafe alternatives. (AP Photo/Fatima Shbair, File)

Premature babies are prepared for transport to Egypt after they were evacuated from Shifa Hospital in Gaza City to a hospital in Rafah, Gaza Strip on Nov. 20, 2023.(AP Photo/Fatima Shbair, File)

Their plight is further complicated due to sporadic aid deliveries that have been hobbled by Israeli restrictions and the relentless fighting.

Displaced Palestinians are also being squeezed into ever tighter areas of the tiny coastal enclave , prompting outbreaks of illness and disease, to which malnourished children are particularly vulnerable. The U.N. says the population is at imminent risk of famine, with a quarter of people already starving.

For Palestinians enduring increasingly dire conditions, the most basic of acts — such as changing a child’s diaper — have become a luxury that can require sacrifice.

“I sold my children’s food so I can buy diapers,” said Raafat Abu Wardeh, who has two children in diapers.

An Israeli tank in a position on the border with the Gaza Strip, as seen in southern Israel, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov)

Aid is not reaching everyone, and shortages of basic goods have caused prices to skyrocket. With Gaza’s economy decimated, few Palestinians have regular incomes and most are either depleting their savings or subsisting on handouts.

At makeshift street stalls, older children working as hawkers sell individual diapers for three to five shekels ($1 to $1.50) or entire packs for up to 170 shekels ($46). A pack of diapers before the war cost 12 shekels ($3.50).

“The prices of diapers are very ridiculous,” said Anis al-Zein, who was buying them along a street in central Deir al-Balah and is not related to Zainab. “A child costs you 20 shekels ($5) a day. Especially in a bad situation like this, all prices are high and there is no income for people. There isn’t even aid.”

Some parents are using cloth diapers, but those require washing with water, which is also scarce.

Mohammed al-Khatib, the local program manager for the U.K.-based Medical Aid for Palestinians, said some people have been forced to buy smaller diapers and tape them together.

FILE - A Palestinian baby wounded in Israeli bombardment of the Gaza Strip is treated in a hospital in Khan Younis on Dec. 1, 2023. The war in Gaza has sparked a humanitarian catastrophe that has prompted shortages of the most basic necessities. Among those hardest hit are babies, young children and their parents. That's because diapers and formula are hard to find or have prices that are increased to unaffordable prices. Parents are looking to inadequate or even unsafe alternatives. (AP Photo/Fatima Shbair, File)

A Palestinian baby wounded in Israeli bombardment of the Gaza Strip is treated in a hospital in Khan Younis on Dec. 1, 2023. (AP Photo/Fatima Shbair, File)

Lack of fresh produce, the proliferation of unregulated food stalls and cold weather has contributed to the spread of illness, including respiratory infections, skin rashes and diarrhea. “It is winter, and the kids are wet most of the time,” al-Khatib said.

The war, triggered by the deadly Oct. 7 Hamas assault on southern Israel, has unleashed unimaginable destruction, with more than 27,000 Palestinians killed and close to 67,000 wounded in Israel’s offensive, according to local health officials.

The Health Ministry in Hamas-run Gaza does not differentiate in its count between civilians and combatants but says two-thirds of those killed were women and children. Israel blames Hamas for the high death toll because the group carries out attacks and militant activities in residential areas.

The Hamas attack killed about 1,200 people in Israel, most of them civilians, and roughly 250 were taken hostage.

The lack of diapers has added to the poor sanitary conditions for the estimated 1.7 million displaced Palestinians, many of whom are crammed into overcrowded shelters.

The United Nations’ children’s agency UNICEF said this week that most of the newly displaced have only 1-2 liters (50-67 ounces) of water a day to drink, cook and wash. It said chronic diarrhea among children was ticking up.

UNICEF says aid deliveries into Gaza are not meeting the vast needs.

The agency estimates 20,000 infants up to 6 months old need formula, which UNICEF has been delivering along with necessities that have also included diapers and cash.

“This is far from being enough to address the colossal needs of the children in Gaza,” said UNICEF spokesperson Ammar Ammar.

The needs of infants are part of a broader threat to all 335,000 children in Gaza under 5 years old, who are at high risk of severe malnutrition and preventable death, UNICEF said.

“For many families in Gaza, the threat of dying from hunger is already real,” Ammar said.

The U.N. humanitarian office said Wednesday that recent screenings show that nearly 10% of children under the age of 5 suffer from acute malnutrition, a 12-fold increase from before the war. The rate is even higher in northern Gaza, which has been largely cut off from aid for months.

For Zainab al-Zein, the difficult choice to feed her now-4-month-old baby crushed biscuits and ground rice instead of formula has meant frequent trips to the local hospital, which like Gaza’s health care system at large is under deep strain from the war.

Health care providers typically recommend parents wait until their child is 6 months old before feeding them solids. Research has found that babies who are given solid food too early are at higher risk of developing certain chronic diseases.

Rocking in an infant bouncer and swaddled in a blanket, Linda cried ceaselessly as her mother tried to feed her.

⁠“This is known, of course, as unhealthy eating, and we know that it causes her intestinal distress, bloating and colic,” said al-Zein. “What can I do?”

Magdy reported from Cairo.

Follow AP’s coverage of the Israel-Hamas war at https://apnews.com/hub/israel-hamas-war

baby formula for travel

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  1. Traveling with Baby Formula Tips • Flying With A Baby

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  2. Easy Baby Formula Travel Tip

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  3. How To Travel With Baby Formula?

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  4. Top 10 Baby Formula Travel Dispensers of 2023

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  5. Travel Tips for Formula Fed Baby

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  6. Different Types Of Infant Formulas

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COMMENTS

  1. Baby Formula

    Checked Bags: Yes Formula, breast milk, toddler drinks, and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces or 100 milliliters are allowed in carry-on baggage and do not need to fit within a quart-sized bag.

  2. Flying with Your Baby: How to Travel With Baby Formula on a Plane

    1. Security Regulations and Restrictions: Security measures are paramount in air travel. Be prepared for your baby formula to undergo additional screening procedures at security checkpoints. Inform the TSA officers that you're carrying baby formula, whether it's ready-to-feed formula, powdered formula, or breast milk.

  3. Traveling with Baby Formula Tips • Flying With A Baby

    Can you fly with baby formula? Absolutely! If you are wondering " How much baby milk can I take on a plane? " - the first important thing to know about traveling with baby formula is that you are exempt from the normal hand baggage liquid rules which limit liquids at 100ml. Sometimes this is known as the 3-1-1 rule.

  4. How to Travel with Baby Formula (By Plane or In the Car)

    Formula - If you're traveling domestically, chances are that there will be a store nearby that sells the type of formula you give to your baby. But be sure to do your research ahead of time to ensure this is the case.

  5. How to Travel with Baby Formula

    It must be below 200 mg/litre of sodium and no more than 250mg/litre of sulphate. Most brands fall well within these amounts. Powdered Formula vs. Ready-to-Drink If you are already feeding ready-to-drink formula, and you don't think it will be available at your destination, it's safe to say your luggage will be very heavy.

  6. TSA: How to Fly with Baby Formula & Baby Food

    The TSA classifies baby formula as medically necessary, so you can pack as much baby formula as you need for the trip without being limited to the 3.4-ounce rule that applies to other liquids. When you go through security screening, inform airport security of the amount of baby formula you're carrying.

  7. 5 Tips for Traveling with Baby Formula

    1. Think about when your baby normally eats You can often buy yourself a couple of hours to run errands if you plan your day around your baby's usual feeding schedule. Try to schedule tasks for just after you've fed your little one. That way, you can enjoy some time before they're hungry again. 2. Note the number of feedings to prepare

  8. TSA Rules For Traveling With Baby Formula

    Yes, you do. According to TSA regulations, all liquids, including baby formula and your baby car seat, should be taken out of your carry-on bags and screened separately. This means that you need to take your baby formula out of your carry-on and place it in a separate bin for screening.

  9. Tips for Flying With Babies

    Essential Baby Travel Tips 1. Plan Ahead for Feedings. Ensure that you have enough formula or breast milk for the entire flight, taking into account potential delays. If you're using a ready-to-use formula, it can help to purchase smaller containers to make on-the-go storage easier. 2. Pack Extra Diapers and Wipes

  10. Traveling with Children

    Your child or infant does not need to be present or traveling with you to bring breast milk, formula and/or related supplies. Inform the TSA officer at the beginning of the screening process that you are carrying formula, breast milk, toddler drinks and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) in excess of 3.4 ounces.

  11. Can You Bring Baby Formula On A Plane? (Powder vs Liquid TSA Rules)

    You can bring powered baby formula on a plane in your carry-on bag or checked bags. But when packing powdered formula in hand luggage the powders rule applies. There is no limit to the amount of powdered baby formula you can pack in your carry-on luggage.

  12. How To Travel With Formula? Your Ultimate Guide

    According to TSA guidelines, formula, breast milk, juice, and baby food in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces (100ml) are allowed in carry-on baggage and do not need to fit in a quart-sized bag. You are permitted to bring acceptable amounts of breast milk and baby formula with you on your trip.

  13. How To Pack Baby Formula On A Road Trip: 11 Hacks

    1. Pack All You'll Need Pack enough formula for the whole trip. I know many mamas who have had trouble finding their formula when traveling. Try not to switch formulas while away from home it may cause an unexpected allergy or discomfort for your sweet baby.

  14. Traveling with Infant Formula

    For longer trips: Bring infant formula and water separately. If you will be traveling for longer than 2 hours, consider bringing water and formula powder or concentrate separately and preparing feeds as you need them. This will help keep the formula safe for your baby. 1. Many parents purchase formula dispensers with sections that you can pre ...

  15. Can I bring baby formula on a plane? (TSA's Rules)

    Yes, you can bring baby formula on a plane. Baby formula is one of a few liquids that does not need to follow the TSA's 3-1-1 rule. You are allowed to bring more than 3.4 ounces of baby formula on a plane and it does not need to fit in one-quart sized bag. Also, you can bring baby formula in your carry-on even if your child is not on the ...

  16. Traveling Safely with Infants & Children

    Advise adults traveling with children to seek medical attention for an infant or young child with diarrhea who has signs of moderate to severe dehydration, bloody diarrhea, body temperature >101.3°F (38.5°C), or persistent vomiting (unable to maintain oral hydration). Adequate hydration is the mainstay of TD management.

  17. How to Travel with Baby Formula on a Plane

    Liquid amounts. For baby food including breast milk, water for formula, liquid formula, juice, and other forms of milk, you're allowed to bring "a reasonable amount" of each above the 100ml/container limit. The amount that is reasonable to take through security is left up to the TSA officer. I have actually run into issues with this when ...

  18. TSA rules for flying with breast milk or baby formula, explained

    TSA regulations make generous allowances for milk and formula: Formula, breast milk, toddler drinks, and baby/toddler food (to include puree pouches) in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces or 100 ...

  19. How to Pack Formula for Air Travel [Step by Step Guide]

    1. Familiarize Yourself with Airline Regulations Before starting your trip, ensure you know the airline's rules about traveling with baby formula. Every airline has guidelines, so check out their website or call customer service for details.

  20. How to Travel with Baby Formula (Explained)

    Kids' health experts advise that you can prepare a baby's formula up to 24 hours ahead of time, provided you refrigerate it. Take advantage of this and store baby formula in a cooler bag. It will be easier to pull it out and warm it during feeding. Carry a Travel Bottle Warmer. A baby bottle warmer is essential when traveling by plane or car.

  21. Baby Formula Travel Packs : Target

    131 results for "baby formula travel packs" Pickup Shop in store Same Day Delivery Shipping Enfamil Enspire Powder Infant Formula Refill Pack - 30oz Enfamil 2867 SNAP EBT eligible $62.99 ($2.10/ounce) When purchased online Similac Alimentum Non-GMO Hypoallergenic Powder Baby Formula - 12.1oz Similac 825 SNAP EBT eligible $36.49 ($3.02/ounce)

  22. Best formula dispensers

    Best formula dispenser overall: Accmor Baby Milk Powder Formula Dispenser. Best formula dispenser for travel: Dr. Brown's Baby Formula Dispenser. Best formula dispenser and mixer: PopYum Anti-Colic Formula Making Baby Bottles. Best formula pitcher : Munchkin Smart Blend Formula Mixing Pitcher. What to look for in formula dispensers.

  23. Amazon.com: Baby Formula Travel

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  24. The 7 Best Baby Formulas of 2024

    You should consider these formulas only if your baby has a diagnosed medical need for them. A2: In 2020, Enfamil, Gerber, and Similac released formulas featuring A2 milk. A1 and A2 refer to the ...

  25. Flying with a baby: 15 tips for an easier trip

    Powdered formula: Fill bottle(s) with clean water, and bring a small container of powdered formula and a scoop with you on the plane. You can measure, shake, and serve a bottle to your baby when ...

  26. Diapers and baby formula are hard to find in Gaza, leaving parents

    For Zainab al Zein, the difficult choice to feed her now-4-month-old baby crushed biscuits and ground rice instead of formula has meant frequent trips to the local hospital, which like Gaza's ...

  27. Sunak is 'sad' parents are forced to water down baby formula due to

    At the time of Sky's reporting in summer 2023, the price of the cheapest brand of baby formula had increased by 45% in the previous two years. Read more: Baby formula prices a 'catastrophe'- MP

  28. Israel-Hamas war: Parents desperate to find diapers and baby formula in

    Updated 1:53 AM PST, February 7, 2024. DEIR AL-BALAH, Gaza Strip (AP) — Zainab al-Zein was forced to make a desperate decision: Feed her infant daughter solid foods that her tiny body may not be able to digest or watch her starve because of a lack of baby formula in the besieged Gaza Strip. Al-Zein chose to give 2 1/2-month-old Linda solids ...