Astronomy Scope

Celestron Travel Scope 70 Review [Should You Buy It?]

Jeremy Williams Astronomy Scope Founder & Author

Welcome to my Celestron Travel Scope 70 review!

As an avid amateur astronomer who loves to take my telescope on the road, I was eager to test out the Travel Scope 70.

This lightweight, compact telescope seemed like the perfect option for portability without sacrificing quality.

But was the purchase the right one? Am I pleased? Am I satisfied?

Well, after taking it out for many observation sessions over the past few months, I’m ready to share my thorough review.

If you’re looking for a telescope to take with you on camping trips, air travel, or just quick jaunts out to dark skies from the city, keep reading.

I’ll give you an in-depth look at the Travel Scope 70’s optics, accessories, ease of use, and performance under different conditions.

You’ll get the real scoop on how well this scope stands up to its claims of being a great grab-and-go telescope for beginners and experts alike.

Short of time? Here is my Celestron Travel Scope 70 Review:

celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

Quick Verdict

I would wholeheartedly recommend the Celestron Travel Scope 70.

Its effortless setup and remarkable portability promise a hassle-free experience, ensuring you can get observing the cosmos/nature quicker and never miss a moment.

It looks fantastic, is built to last and can easily be transported around in (the included) padded backpack.

You’ll struggle to find a telescope of its quality anywhere near this price point.

Table of Contents

Celestron Travel Scope 70 Review

I recommend the Celestron Travel Scope 70 for novice and traveling astronomers seeking an affordable, portable telescope. Despite its compact size, it provides quality views of lunar, planetary, deep sky and terrestrial targets.

Personal Testing Results

Having spent considerable time with the Celestron Travel Scope 70, I have conducted a thorough evaluation of this telescope across various key aspects.

This involved scrutinizing the optical quality for clarity, sharpness, and color fidelity, essential for a rewarding stargazing experience.

I also examined the magnification power and the aperture size of the telescope to determine its effectiveness in celestial viewing.

The build quality was another critical area of my assessment, focusing on the telescope’s durability and the comfort it offers during extended observation sessions.

I tested the Celestron Travel Scope 70 under various lighting conditions, with a special emphasis on its performance in low-light scenarios to understand its capabilities in night sky observation.

Furthermore, I conducted a comparative analysis, positioning the Celestron Travel Scope 70 against similar telescopes in the market to gauge its standing.

Below are the results of my comprehensive testing of the Celestron Travel Scope 70:

Overall Score: 7

My Testing Criteria

Below are the various tests I ran, and a brief description as to what each testing feature/aspect included:

  • Test clarity and sharpness by observing known celestial objects.
  • Check for chromatic aberration around bright objects.
  • Evaluate light gathering ability in low light conditions for faint stars or deep sky objects.
  • Test different eyepieces for various magnifications.
  • Assess the field of view for observing large objects or star fields.
  • Evaluate the stability of the mount and vibration transmission.
  • For motorized mounts, test tracking accuracy for long exposure astrophotography.
  • Assess the ease of setup and portability.
  • Evaluate the simplicity of the alignment process.
  • Check the quality of materials and overall construction.
  • Assess weather resistance against dew or light moisture.
  • Test compatibility with cameras and assess the quality of astrophotography.
  • Evaluate the quality of photos, especially for deep-sky objects.
  • Test functionality and user-friendliness of smart features like GPS or Go-To technology.
  • Review the quality and usefulness of included accessories.
  • Consider the ergonomics, such as eye relief and viewing position.
  • Assess the learning curve for both beginners and advanced users.
  • Compare features and performance with other telescopes in the same price range.
  • Gather information about the warranty, customer service, and availability of replacement parts.
  • Conduct multiple observation sessions in various conditions.
  • Compare with other telescopes of similar specifications .

My Video Review

My photos of the telescope.

celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

What I Like About The Celestron Travel Scope 70

Speed of setup/dismantling.

One of the best things about the Travel Scope 70 is how fast you can get it set up and ready to observe.

As an impatient stargazer, I love that I can have it fully assembled in just 5 minutes once I got the hang of it.

Even if you’ve never used it before, it only takes 10-15 minutes to get it up and running.

With just 8 simple steps to put the components together, setup is a breeze.

Over time you’ll get even faster at assembling and dismantling this portable scope.

General Design and Instrument Quality

The overall design and quality of this little refractor telescope punches above its weight class.

The manual alt-azimuth mount makes pointing intuitive without complex levers or knobs.

I also appreciate the fully multi-coated optics that maximize light transmission for bright, vivid images.

The telescope has a nice look and feel that belies its affordable price tag.

Use and Versatility

A major plus is that the Travel Scope 70 isn’t just for astronomy – it doubles as a killer terrestial telescope for wildlife viewing, scenery, and more.

The image diagonal delivers correctly oriented views which is great for daytime sightseeing.

Whether I’m scoping out birds at sunrise or gazing at the moon at midnight, this scope has me covered.

Accessories

The included accessories enhance functionality for a great out-of-the-box experience.

The 10mm and 20mm eyepieces provide nice low and higher magnification options.

The padded travel bag has compartments to securely hold all the components.

And the erect image diagonal allows you to see vistas right-side up – very handy.

Value For Money

Considering the optical quality, versatile capabilities, and useful accessories, the Celestron Travel Scope 70 delivers excellent value.

Sure if you compare its optics to some of the premium telescopes it does not compare, but this telescope delivers a lot at its price point and is between 5-20x cheaper than those at the top of the market.

Who Is The Celestron Travel Scope 70 Best For?

The Celestron Travel Scope 70 is perfect for beginning stargazers, travelers, and anyone who wants an easy-to-use grab-and-go telescope, such as young kids.

The manual alt-azimuth mount and accessories like the finderscope make pointing and tracking objects straightforward. Total beginners will appreciate how intuitive it is to use.

Kids love this scope too! It’s simple enough for children but still shows amazing lunar, planetary and star cluster views to spark their interest in astronomy.

Final Verdict: Should You Buy The Celestron Travel Scope 70?

For anyone seeking an affordable, portable scope that delivers quality views, the Travel Scope 70 is a fantastic option. It excels in versatility – great for night sky watching or daylight nature/birding.

While serious astrophotographers may want a more advanced scope, I think the Travel Scope 70 is ideal for casual astronomy.

It’s budget-friendly, easy to use, and compact enough to take wherever your adventures may lead.

So if you’re eager to explore the skies but need a grab-and-go telescope, I highly recommend adding the Travel Scope 70 to your astronomy toolkit!

When it comes to getting your hands on it, without doubt the best place to do so is on Amazon. You’ll benefit from speedy delivery and more often than not, the best price.

Click here to visit the Amazon Celestron Travel Scope 70 product page directly here.

In the market for a telescope? Read my other telescope reviews:

  • Celestron StarSense Explorer LT 114AZ Review
  • Celestron PowerSeeker 50az Telescope Review
  • Celestron PowerSeeker 127EQ Review

Jeremy Williams Astronomy Scope Founder & Author

Hey, my name is Jeremy. I’m a passionate and seasoned astronomer who loves nothing more than observing the night sky. I also love researching, learning, and writing all things Space and the Universe. I created Astronomy Scope to share my knowledge, experience, suggestions, and recommendations of what I have learned along the way while helping anyone to get into and maximize their enjoyment of the hobby.

American Eclipse USA

Celestron Travel Scope 70 Telescope Review – Model 21035

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links and we may earn a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.

In my opinion the Travel Scope 70 is an entry-level telescope for those on-the-go or for a beginner user.

It comes with all the gear necessary to start observing the night sky or to see groupings from hundreds of yards away. Most importantly, it’s not a wallet-buster.

I really like that you’ll save some cash and your back with this lightweight, better than expected, portable telescope.

Celestron Travel Scope 70 Telescope Review

Celestron Travel Scope 70 350px

Celestron Travel Scope 70 Telescope

Compare Prices at:

✔️ Best Feature: Lightweight and portable

❌ Worst Feature: Some false coloring

👌 Ideal For: Terrestrial Viewing, Celestial Viewing, Travel, Range Use, Birdwatching

  • Optical Design: Refractor
  • Aperture: 70 mm/2.8”
  • Focal Length: 400 mm/15.74”
  • Focal Ratio: f/5.7
  • Eyepieces Included: 20 mm, 10 mm

Our Verdict: I like that the Travel Scope 70 is designed specifically to be a take-and-go, portable telescope for both terrestrial and celestial viewing. It is great for the observer who wants a short-focus and wide-field telescope on a budget.

Who is the Celestron Travel Scope 70 Best Suited to?

Travel Scope 70 eyepiece

This Celestron Scope is made with ultimate portability in mind, so essentially, it’s designed for any observer who does a lot of traveling with their scope . This could mean anything from traveling across the country and globe-trotting to hikes, camping, and other sites in which you’d need to travel to get there.

Unfortunately, I believe its optical build has limitations for the intermediate and experienced user, so professional use is out of the question. Hence, it’s a great scope for the beginner observer or for an experienced one looking for recreational use with reasonable quality while sticking to the lowest budgets.

There are several factors in which I judge the Travel Scope: portability for travel, daytime viewing, as a spotting scope, astronomical scope, and wildlife scope. It has a lot to live up to and having been priced under $100, expectations shouldn’t be set too high.

The Travel Scope 70 is one of my favorite telescopes under $100 and is an excellent daytime scope when you need it for terrestrial viewing for activities like spotting rifle and archery groupings at the range and observing wildlife activity from a distance. For birdwatching, there is some chromatic aberration that limits this observation for professional use or photography, but it suffices for the amateur birder. As a nighttime scope for casual astronomical use, expect reasonable performance for lunar, planetary, and open star clusters.

Features & Benefits

Celestron Travel Scope 70

Lightweight & Portable

As a portable scope, it’s compact and lightweight. Most of this is due to its plastic components to shave off weight and cost. Yes, the objective lens is housed in a plastic cell and the focuser is mostly made of plastic, but fortunately, the scope tube and bracket are made from aluminum.

What I like is the telescope itself weighs 1.5 lbs and is 17”x 3.87” in size – extremely lightweight and compact. The included full-size tripod weighs 1.8 lbs, so everything comes in together at around 3.3 lbs. With all the accessories loaded into the included backpack for travel, you truly have a portable setup that can conveniently be taken on the go. Hiking, biking, driving, and flying – the Travel Scope is built for easy travel.

Makeshift Aperture Stop

Below, I address false coloring and its issues. Fortunately, there’s a makeshift fix to tone down bright objects, improve visibility on details, and remove most chromatic aberration. The objective lens cap is made in two parts. By removing the center part and attaching the lens cap, you essentially have an aperture mask that provides the benefits mentioned. You may find this to be incredibly helpful to improve astronomical viewing at night on those bright star and open clusters.

Two Eyepieces Included

A 20 mm 20x eyepiece and 10 mm 40x eyepiece are included in the telescope bundle which I think is great. While the 10 mm eyepiece boasts of higher magnification, it has little performance benefits through this scope other than magnifying an image, particularly to see lunar and planetary details. However, field of view is restricted, and image resolution degrades.

The 20 mm eyepiece will do well for most purposes with its wider viewing, bright and sharp image resolution, and good power. It provides up to a max useful magnification of 140x but I found pushing it to 168x magnification that the manufacturer states will result in picture degradation.

Not only are the two eyepieces included but a 45-degree image correct diagonal is also provided.

As a daytime spotting scope, it has a lot of benefits. Using the diagonal is comfortable to use for most terrestrial needs. One area in which I found it provides better than average performance is resolving bullet holes and arrow impacts at the range.

See groupings at 90 yards at the archery range and see bullet holes at several hundred yards, even 500 yards and maybe 1000 yards if mirage and weather don’t interfere first. Of course, you can use shoot ‘n see targets to improve visibility. However, the included tripod will need to be retracted for bench-top use.

YouTube video

Limitations

Some false coloring.

This became apparent as I was looking through the scope at bright objects like the moon or at targets with high contrast such as a white poster against the setting sun. While the included 45-degree diagonal provides an upright and correct image view, it is in an all-plastic housing and combining  this with a short focal length, you’ll inevitably have false coloring on the fringes of target images, also known as chromatic aberration (CA).

While the amount of CA present is acceptable for amateur users and recreational use, it is unacceptable for photography, professional astronomy, and professional wildlife and fauna observation including birdwatching.

Mediocre Accessories

I like that the Travel Scope 70 comes with a lot of accessories including a full-size tripod, but again, expectations shouldn’t be set too high. Although the tripod is a fully-extendable one, it’s best suited for bench and table-top use. Fully extended, it’s too flimsy to support the lightweight frame of the scope and I feel it becomes very unstable to look through.

Additionally, even though the Celestron travel scope comes with two eyepieces, I feel the 20 mm one is the only useful eyepiece. The 10 mm lens has a restrictive field of view, is dimmer, and introduces more chromatic aberration.

Other Telescopes to Consider

Two other standout telescopes with similar features and around the same price point are the Orion SkyScanner 100mm and the Emarth Travel Scope . I think these are worth checking out.

Popular Questions

It is not sealed and so is not waterproof. You’ll want to pack it up if it starts to pour on you. Additionally, it’s probably best if you use a waterproof backpack for trips where it might take you longer than you expect to get back to shelter in inclement weather.

The lenses themselves are glass and are fully-coated. However, the objective lens is held within a plastic lens cell within an optical tube made of aluminum. The eyepiece bodies are also plastic, but the barrels are made of metal with a chrome finish.

Yes. You can clearly see the moon with either the 20 or 10 mm eyepieces, and this is true of seeing Venus and Jupiter and its moons. Using the 10 mm eyepiece, you can view Saturn and its rings although it may appear as a line running through it or connected to the planet. Of course, local light pollution will play a role in its visibility, but the view is better than expected.

This specific scope has been bought for children from ages 8 and up. Young users will need supervision and guidance on how to use and care for the telescope. However, this is also a beginner’s telescope for adults. It’s not marketed as a kid’s telescope but due to its ease of use, compact size, and light weight, it’s suitable for many types of observers.

No. Images are seen as you would see with your own natural sight. Since it’s designed as a both a terrestrial and celestial telescope, the included 45-degree diagonal provides right-side up images. This has been said to be extremely useful for terrestrial viewing, but not so comfortable for astronomical use as you look towards the sky.

The Celestron Travel Scope 70 has impressed me with its key benefits include 2x eyepieces, a 45-degree diagonal, and its lightweight and portable size. Since it’s a beginner and entry-level telescope, it’s geared towards amateurs, recreational users, and those who need both spotting scope and astronomical viewing in one package.

While I found it may do better at terrestrial viewing than celestial, it does give you a leg up into developing skills needed to eventually upgrade to something bigger and better. For the price, the Travel Scope is a budget model that helps you get started into the hobby without breaking the bank.

celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

The allure of the cosmos captivates Fern, with its endless wonders and celestial majesty. There’s a unique tranquility, yet an undeniable thrill, in uncovering the intricacies of our vast galaxy. Away from her telescope, Fern finds solace in the pages of a gripping novel, often accompanied by a cup of her favorite tea.

Astronomy Source

Review: Celestron TravelScope 70 Telescope

Author: Luna Gregoria

Updated: Nov 7, 2022

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When it comes to the telescopes we review, our editorial board (which is comprised entirely of astronomers) make unbiased judgments. Please keep in mind that our performance rating system on this page is completely unrelated to any kind of monetary gain.

I want to like the Celestron TravelScope 70, I really do. I have had fun with it. But I just can’t recommend it to beginners for astronomy. And though I’m not an expert on daytime spotting scopes, I’d probably advise against getting one for that purpose as well. It is a nice optic ruined by poor mechanical design and accessories, and unless you’re willing to spend more time and money replacing its accessories (or if you have them already lying about, as I do), I can not recommend it.

The advertising on the box describes it as a nature observing telescope which can be used for casual astronomy. This seems to sort of explain (or disclaim) some of the... peculiarities of this instrument.

Total Score

5/10: Downsides outweigh upsides

Score Breakdown (out of 5)

Moon & Planets: 3

Rich Field: 3

Accessories: 3

Ease of use: 2

Portability: 5

Read our scoring methodology here .

  • A nice 70mm f/6 achromatic objective.
  • Lightweight and portable.
  • Sturdy enough.
  • Decent eyepieces.
  • Stopped down effective aperture.
  • Useless optical finderscope.
  • Terrible 45-degree erecting prism.
  • Useless, extremely wobbly tripod.

The Competition

I picked mine up used for $50, and I think at that price it’s just about right. But at full price? There are better options in most cases.

If you want a telescope that is small, lightweight, and very easy to use, consider the Orion SkyScanner 100 or Zhumell Z100, a 4” tabletop reflector. And at this price point, if you want to scan wide fields of view across the sky searching for bright deep-sky-objects and star fields, consider a pair of binoculars instead. A 10x50mm or 7x50mm pair of binoculars have the same overall light gathering.

Our Verdict

If you’re already a telescope owner, this might be a good portable option for you, for the same reason as the ST80. I find the TravelScope 70 is lightweight enough that it plays much nicer on photo tripods than the ST80 that I own, and despite getting the ST80 specifically as a grab-n-go scope, I found that I would end up taking the TravelScope 70 outside instead, especially if I wanted a peek at something behind the trees, visible from a different part of my yard. It’s a bit like a ShortTube 70 , in overall design and in application, and for an astro-tinkerer you may be able to fix some of its shortcomings.

But for a beginner? There are probably better options. Even Celestron’s TravelScope 80, though it has some similar bad accessories, has the beloved Synta-made ShortTube 80 optics and mechanical design, and it’s only around $20 more expensive. Meade’s AdventureScope 80 is like the TravelScope 80 but with a marginally better diagonal. (And if you’re considering getting a TS80 or AS80, why not go for the fully kitted out ST80-A or ST80-EQ?)  

Just be sure, before you buy, that you’re ok with buying a telescope without a tripod or mount, because that’s effectively what you’ll be getting--the tripod must be replaced to do astronomy with it, and should probably be replaced even if you just want a daytime spotting scope. Treat it as an optical tube and eyepieces only.

celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

Celestron Travelscope 70

Rating: 2.5/5

The Tripod of the Celestron TravelScope 70

I have some bad news and some good news.

I normally discuss the optics first, but I’m going to address the tripod first this time, because it is the most important thing to beware of with this telescope. The tripod belongs in the trash . It might work, barely , for a small point-and-shoot toy camera. But a telescope will magnify any small wobble and cause the image to shift and shake tremendously. Even at low magnification, I found that it was almost unusable, but I could just about find focus. At 40x, I couldn’t even find focus–any tap of the focuser knob sent the image into several seconds of shaking. The mount head is soft and plastic, and it feels like it wants to break instead of move where I want it to. It is hopelessly unbalanced in the altitude axis, which means pointing above about 45 degrees is futile. (Of course, for reasons I’ll get into, it’d be futile anyway). It’s also so short that even when fully extended, I had to take a chair out and sit down to reach the eyepiece. It’s too short even for terrestrial use, pointing around the horizon.

That was the bad news. The good news is that the TravelScope 70 is small enough that it can easily be used on any good tripod. So if you already have a nice and sturdy tripod, tall enough for the mount head to get above your face when observing while sitting down (or ideally, when standing as well), then the TravelScope 70 will probably work fine there.

Celestron Travelscope 70

The TravelScope 70 has an achromatic lens objective with an aperture of 70mm and a focal length of 400mm. Its lens elements are nicely coated without bright reflections. My impression is that, for the money, this is a pretty great objective lens. It won’t hold up to any 70mm Apochromat, but you get what you pay for.

There are a few problems with the mechanical design of the TS70. First of all, the (non-collimatable) lens cell, which is similar in design to the ShortTube 80’s and some other cheap achromats I’ve seen, was tightened extremely tight. I put in a lot of elbow grease to loosen the lens cell. The trouble is that this tightened lens cell actually bends the glass, creating “pinched optics.” You might not think glass can bend, but you’re only allowed to bend by 1/1000th the width of saran wrap, so screwing the lens cell down so tight makes the image noticeably fuzzier at high powers. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that the image at first was a mess. After loosening the lens cell just enough that I could hear a slight rattle when shaken (but not too much so that the scope would never be collimated), the image was much cleaner and sharper.

When testing the optics, I did so with and without the 45-degree erecting prism, and I found that without the prism, the image is actually pretty good. It’s got some spherical aberration (in the star test it looks pretty bad, but in actual use, it’s not too noticeable, definitely not at 40x given by the stock 10mm eyepiece) and it is a little rough. It remained out of collimation. It is possible (though tedious) to fix collimation in a lens cell like this, but it wasn’t bad enough to worry about.

The biggest optical problem in the telescope tube is actually part of the mechanical design of the telescope. The focuser used seems to be identical to the one used on a long-focus 70mm achromat, so it’s too long, and it actually protrudes into the light path. For some positions of the focuser, the entire 70mm objective is visible, for others it’s restricted to perhaps only 60mm! Overall, the aperture is probably around 65mm when used with a mirror star diagonal . It’s 60mm or less when the stock prism diagonal is used, since it takes up more focuser travel and vignettes the light path. It may be possible to saw off part of the focuser drawtube to fix this oversight. I haven’t done this for the review. This is a frankly embarrassing error to make since, as far as I can tell, the quality of the objective is easily good enough to justify making full use of all 70mm of it.

The Accessories

The two eyepieces are a 20mm and a 10mm Modified Achromat (a variant of a Kellner eyepiece that has three elements). They have fairly wide fields of view, sharp centers, and passable edges. They’re nothing special, but they’re far better than what many beginner telescopes come with, and they definitely work for this purpose.

The TravelScope 70 comes with a black nylon bag that can hold the tripod and telescope. It’s a nice extra, and it might have come in handy if the tripod that’s meant to go with it was any good. If you get a nice, but small, tripod, you might make use of it.

The two real letdowns among the accessories are the finderscope and the prism diagonal. The finderscope is ridiculous. Galileo’s telescope was probably better. These things barely belong in a McDonald’s happy meal toy, let alone a telescope. It is barely sufficient for sighting through it to find targets, but it isn’t usable on its own as a wide-field finderscope.

The biggest problem with the accessories, other than the tripod, is the 45-degree erecting prism, which goes between the focuser drawtube and the eyepiece. The body is made of plastic, and it feels cheap. It is both an ergonomic and an optical disaster.

Diagonals typically come in 45-degree angles (with erecting prisms) or 90-degree angles (either with a mirror or an erecting prism). This is because, if you imagine pointing a telescope with no diagonal at all high in the sky, you’d have to crane your neck uncomfortably to get your eye to the eyepiece. A 90 degree diagonal is preferred for astronomy since it allows a comfortable viewing angle even when pointed all the way to the zenith (top of the sky). A 45 degree prism can’t go above 45 degrees before you have to start looking up into it. However, 45 degree prisms can be preferred for nature observing if the tripod is tall enough. And for a terrestrial spotting scope, you do want an upright image. Mirror diagonals will show a mirror image, but don’t degrade the image as much. Because the tripod is so short, a 90 degree erecting prism would have been preferred.

The problems don’t stop with ergonomics. Unfortunately, it also degrades the optics of the telescope. The view of the Moon was plenty sharp with a mirror diagonal installed, but going back to the prism, the view became blurry and there was a lot of chromatic aberration (false color fringing). It’s adequate for viewing at low powers, but it causes very noticeable fringing before you even get to 40x. The prism itself is miscollimated–looking into the prism, the view of the objective lens is off-center, and that means you’re getting even less light.

Upgrading the Accessories

Upgrading the eyepieces is a low priority, as they should serve you for a while.

The finderscope should be replaced with a red dot finder. Red dot finders have no magnification at all, they just project a red dot through a small lens/window onto the sky and use some optical trickery to make it look like it’s “at infinity.” (There’s no parallax). When upgrading, be sure to find one with a compatible mounting foot. The mount is done with two screw-stalks that stick up out of the optical tube, the finder mount slips over them, then two thumb-nuts are screwed onto the stalks. This is the same finder mounting system used by other telescopes like the FirstScope/FunScope, Orion SkyScanner, and more.

Finding objects can be done at low power with the telescope itself—it is its own finderscope.

Upgrading the tripod is the most urgently needed fix, but decent tripods are pretty expensive. Don’t buy the scope unless you already have a decent tripod. If you already have the scope and want an upgraded tripod, don’t spend more than $100 on one. For around $100-150, there are better telescope options altogether.

The prism diagonal is the next most urgently needed replacement. Keep it around for comparison or for when you want to do terrestrial observing, but it’s just no good for serious astronomy.

For astronomy, you want an economical mirror star diagonal. Don’t go too expensive, you just need a cheap $30 or so 1.25” diagonal to get the job done. The views of the Moon, planets, and double stars will be sharper and more color free, and you’ll be able to use longer-focus eyepieces with wider fields of view, and you’ll be able to use more of the telescope’s aperture. And to top it all off, it’ll just be more comfortable to use.

General Use

After my first half hour using the telescope, I was exhausted trying to work around its awful mount. However, in that time, I was able to observe the Double Cluster in Perseus, the Orion Nebula, and the Andromeda Galaxy, and I was pleased enough by them to not immediately write off the telescope as a failure.

After a rest indoors, I set the telescope up again with my good tripod, the mirror diagonal off my Orion ST80, and a red dot finder, and I went out and had a lot of fun with it. It isn’t a powerful telescope, but I personally enjoy small telescope observing quite a lot. The wide-field views you can get with small short telescopes make up for the small aperture, so you can fit a lot of stars in the eyepiece.

The Orion Nebula showed its bright core easily, though somewhat softly, and hinted at the tenuous outer layers of gas and dust. Three stars in the trapezium were easily resolved, and the fourth wasn’t too difficult at 40x. At low power, the entire Orion’s Sword stellar association is visible and very pretty, with the nebula showing up as a fuzzy blob in the middle.

I was not able to see any details in the Andromeda Galaxy M31–the satellite galaxy M32 was only suspected, and there was no hint of the fainter M110. All I could see was a ghostly pale core of the galaxy, and this was the one object that was especially disappointing in comparison with what other small scopes of mine had shown.

Some of my favorite small scope targets are the open clusters M35, M37, M36, and M38, which follow a line up from Castor-Twin’s Foot in Gemini up to the middle of Auriga the Chariot. M37 and M36 can be seen together in the same field of view with a wide field 32mm Plossl eyepiece (though not together with the stock 20mm), as well as M36 and M38. The appearance of these clusters is a fuzzy blob that can be resolved into a glittery mess, with varying degrees of sparkle and fuzziness. Each of these are groups of young stars just spreading out into the Milky Way, and they are observed best in winter and spring.

I was able to see the Clown Face Nebula, though it required a higher magnification of 67x to resolve it as a planet-shaped nebula instead of a star, I only suspected it was a nebula at 40x.

I was even able to observe M81 and M82, a pair of galaxies in Ursa Major.

I went out one night to compare my Orion ShortTube 80 (optically identical to the Celestron TravelScope 80’ s objective lens) with the TravelScope 70. By my calculation, the difference between the two shouldn’t have been especially noticeable, but it definitely was. The view of Caldwell 64, the Tau Canis Majoris Cluster, was so much dimmer than the view through the ST80 that it required averted vision to suspect there was more than one star, whereas the ST80 showed it with a sparkly halo easily. The ST80 could just barely do the two bright components in the Leo Triplet, while I couldn’t see them at all in the TravelScope 70. The overall character of the images was the same (to be expected when observing at the same magnification), but the TS70 was dimmer than it should have been, which confirms that the effective aperture was stopped down.

If you go in with the correct expectations (objects will be dim and gray) and look for the right objects (look for objects in guides for small telescopes and binoculars, rather than the famously named nebula you’ve seen in pictures), the telescope can work just fine for deep sky viewing from a suburban or darker sky. In a rural sky, it’d be powerful enough to see every one of the Messier objects. I find that it’s much easier to find and appreciate deep sky objects in a small scope after you’ve gotten familiar with deep sky observing in a larger telescope. But there’s no reason you can’t start small if you set your expectations right.

As I write this, there are no planets worth looking at (Mars is a dot in even the largest telescopes), so the only high-resolution tests I could put the telescope through were of double stars and the Moon.

At high power, the focuser is loose enough to reveal a bit of image shift as you rack the focuser in and out. Without shimming the focuser, this means maintaining good collimation will be difficult. Other than that, the focuser isn’t wobbly or loose, and even at high power, I can find best focus pretty easily.  

With the 45-degree prism, the Moon was aesthetically pretty at low powers but a bit of a rainbow mess at 40x and higher. With the mirror diagonal, the moon became much sharper and you could really begin to appreciate its features. I found the 40mm sub-aperture-mask dustcap it comes with wasn’t really needed; it’s plenty sharp enough even at 67x, and there’s no chromatic aberration noticeable until you overpower the scope to about 167x. (Maximum useful power would be around 100-130x) It held its own against a cheap 70mm long-focus achromat and the ShortTube 80.

At one point, while observing, I dropped the telescope about 5 feet onto the floor. There seems to have been no damage. The story might’ve been different on concrete, but I like the scope enough that I don’t want to intentionally drop-test it.

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Celestron Travel Scope 70DX

Celestron Travel Scope 70DX Review

The Celestron Travel Scope 70DX is a 70mm aperture refractor telescope from Celestron that is part of the Travel Scope Series which also include the original Travel Scope 70 (that has been a best-seller for years) and the Celestron Travel Scope 60DX . This is the ideal purchase for a beginner that is looking for a portable telescope that comes with a backpack and smartphone adapter equipped with Bluetooth control .

celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

  • THE PERFECT ALL-IN-ONE TELESCOPE KIT: Travel Scope DX features fully-coated glass optics, a potent 70mm objective lens, a full-height tripod, a smartphone adapter and Bluetooth remote to capture images PLUS bonus accessories—all in a custom backpack.
  • POWERFUL EYEPIECES FOR UP-CLOSE VIEWING: Our telescope for astronomy beginners is equipped with two high-quality eyepieces (20mm and 10mm) that provide low- and high-power views. Observe celestial objects at night and land-based objects during the day.
  • LARGE 70MM OBJECTIVE LENS: This refractor telescope features a large, 70mm aperture objective lens that provides brighter, more detailed views compared to the 50mm model while adding very little additional weight.
  • CAPTURE IMAGES AND VIDEO THROUGH THE EYEPIECE: Attach your smartphone to the telescope and use the Bluetooth shutter release to capture & share your own images of the Moon and planets at night or wildlife during the day.
  • INCLUDED ACCESSORIES: Full-height tripod, Moon filter, 2x Barlow lens, Bluetooth shutter release and smartphone adapter, plus a custom backpack to carry it all. You'll also receive a FREE download of one of the top-rated astronomy software programs.

What’s in the box

Celestron-Travel-Scope-70DX-What-s-in-the-Box

Optical Tube

5×24 Finderscope

2 eye pieces (10mm and 20mm)

Erect image diagonal

#58 Green Glass Moon filter,

Digiscoping Smarthpone adapter with Bluetooth remote control

Lunar Landscapes eBook

Tripod & Mount

When it comes to tripods for telescopes under $100 I’m very warry of their quality. I was happy to see a more than decent aluminum tripod with a photo mount here that does it’s job with a passing grade.

@samiialvz My first telescope ✨🌖🔭 #telescope #celestrontelescope #fy #unboxing ♬ Lazy Sunday – Official Sound Studio

About The Author

Ryan Eldon

celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

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celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

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Celestron - 70mm Travel Scope DX - Portable Refractor Telescope - Fully-Coated Glass Optics - Ideal Telescope for Beginners - Bonus Astronomy Software Package - Digiscoping Smartphone Adapter

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Celestron - 70mm Travel Scope DX - Portable Refractor Telescope - Fully-Coated Glass Optics - Ideal Telescope for Beginners - Bonus Astronomy Software Package - Digiscoping Smartphone Adapter

Purchase options and add-ons, about this item.

  • THE PERFECT ALL-IN-ONE TELESCOPE KIT: Travel Scope DX features fully-coated glass optics, a potent 70mm objective lens, a full-height tripod, a smartphone adapter and Bluetooth remote to capture images PLUS bonus accessories—all in a custom backpack.
  • POWERFUL EYEPIECES FOR UP-CLOSE VIEWING: Our telescope for astronomy beginners is equipped with two high-quality eyepieces (20mm and 10mm) that provide low- and high-power views. Observe celestial objects at night and land-based objects during the day.
  • LARGE 70MM OBJECTIVE LENS: This refractor telescope features a large, 70mm aperture objective lens that provides brighter, more detailed views compared to the 50mm model while adding very little additional weight.
  • CAPTURE IMAGES AND VIDEO THROUGH THE EYEPIECE: Attach your smartphone to the telescope and use the Bluetooth shutter release to capture & share your own images of the Moon and planets at night or wildlife during the day.
  • INCLUDED ACCESSORIES: Full-height tripod, Moon filter, 2x Barlow lens, Bluetooth shutter release and smartphone adapter, plus a custom backpack to carry it all. You'll also receive a FREE download of one of the top-rated astronomy software programs.
  • UNBEATABLE WARRANTY & SUPPORT: Buy with confidence from Celestron, a leading telescope brand in California since 1960. Your purchase includes a 2-Year US Warranty and unlimited support from our team of US-based experts.

Frequently bought together

Celestron - 70mm Travel Scope DX - Portable Refractor Telescope - Fully-Coated Glass Optics - Ideal Telescope for Beginners -

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Celestron - AstroMaster 90EQ Refractor Telescope - Refractor Telescope for Beginners - Fully-Coated Glass Optics - Adjustable

From the manufacturer

Travel Scope 70DX Portable Telescope

Travel Scope 70DX Portable Telescope

Grab the Celestron Travel Scope 70DX and go anywhere—from your backyard to another continent. Ample optical performance is packed and ready in this ultra-portable backpack kit.

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Customer Review: It's a great little travel telescope. Highly recommend.

celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

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celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

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celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

What's in the box

  • Optical tube
  • mount/tripod (preassembled)
  • 20mm eyepiece
  • 10mm eyepiece
  • Erect image diagonal, 5x24 finderscope, Smartphone adapter, Bluetooth shutter release button, #58 Green Glass Moon Filter, SkyPortal app, Starry Night Basic Edition, Manual and Backpack

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Looking for specific info, product information, warranty & support, product guides and documents, product description.

Designed with American innovation for beginner stargazers, the Celestron Travel Scope 70DX is a professionally engineered refractor telescope that is perfect for celestial or terrestrial viewing on the go. It’s the perfect telescope for adults and kids to use together with its fully-coated, high-quality glass optics, including a refractor-style 70mm objective lens. Added coating on the large 70mm lens allows more light to enter, providing sharper, crisper viewing of celestial and terrestrial objects during the day or at night. The Celestron telescope for beginners is designed with several operating features that make it exceptionally user-friendly. We’ve included two quality eyepieces (20mm and 10mm), 2x Barlow lens, and a star diagonal for crisp low- and high-power viewing during the day or night, allowing you to enjoy close-ups of wildlife in nature or stargaze. This telescope also comes with a smartphone adapter that allows you to connect any smartphone to any telescope eyepiece with an outside diameter of 45mm or smaller for digiscoping opportunities. To capture the best image, we provided a Bluetooth shutter release that allows you to trigger the camera’s shutter on any Android or iOS smartphone remotely, without disturbing the placement of your phone and telescope.

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Customers say

Customers like the portability and value of the telescope. They mention that it's very light weight, compact and easy to take on a hike. They are also happy with appearance. However, some customers are disappointed with ease of movement. Opinions are mixed on quality, scope, ease of use, and performance.

AI-generated from the text of customer reviews

Customers are mixed about the ease of use of the telescope. Some mention that it's easy to use and set up, and the registration process was simple and fast. However, others say that the instructions are confusing, the telescope is overly complicated to set up and takes some patience to get going.

"...Portability - doesn't kill my back to haul it outside. Sets up in minutes . So easy to take outside, I use it all the time...." Read more

"...in our lives so we had no idea what to do but the instructions were easy to follow ...." Read more

"...The fact that it comes with it's own backpack is a plus. It was super easy to assemble and I was able to view the full moon beautifully...." Read more

"My only complaint is that the smartphone adapter is very difficult to attach to the telescope lens...." Read more

Customers like the portability of the telescope. They say the eyepieces are very light weight, and the backpack makes it super easy to pack in the car and take it with them to the park. They also say the telescope is compact and powerful, and it inspires exploration. The backpack makes the telescope easy to take on a hike. Customers also mention that it sets up in minutes and is easy to carry outside.

"...The eyepieces feel cheap, very light weight , but are surprisingly good. Better than I expected for the price...." Read more

"...and not great for fine tuning your movements but for kids it is light weight , come with a backpack. They can take it where you can get a good dark sky" Read more

"...The backpack makes it super easy to just pack in the car and take it with us to the park and even on vacation to the beach...." Read more

"...So I prefer this one just for its compactness and ease of use. Price evens out to the other more expensive one after the add ons." Read more

Customers appreciate the value of the telescope. They say it is great for its price.

"...All in all, I think this is an amazing scope for the price . Too bad the tripod isn't as good as the scope...." Read more

" Affordable …. But run far away...." Read more

"...Very flimsy to begin with. Telescope is decent for the price , that is the only reason it got 2 stars." Read more

" Good for price and beginners . Easy set up and take down. Tripod isn't the sturdiest with all parts fully extended, but can't complain at this price." Read more

Customers are satisfied with the appearance of the telescope. They mention that the moon looks awesome through the scope, and that it's a really cool little telescope.

"...from the city (I live on the outskirts of Salt Lake City) It was really beautiful on one especially dark night, but most nights it's not dark enough..." Read more

"This is a really cool little telescope , I haven't had a chance to star gaze with it yet but there are a few hurdles to get past for that...." Read more

"...But was immediately impressed. Said too cool ." Read more

" Cool telescope ..." Read more

Customers are mixed about the quality of the telescope. Some mention that the view is totally worth it, and it's great for beginners and gets great views of the moon. It's also very good for pictures of wildlife and looking out on the ocean. However, others say that the style, lightweight and flimsy, making everything a little shaky. They also say the tripod is very floppy so it shakes all over the place.

"...Better than I expected for the price. They have enough eye relief that They work ok with my eyeglasses, but I prefer to take my glasses off when..." Read more

"...options; the only issue i had was with the trypod cause it wasnt stable enough so when you are trying to focus it gets a lot of noise on the image;..." Read more

"...They are having fun with it - perfect beginner telescope " Read more

"...I was a bit disappointed with the quality of the diagonal , spotting scope, and tripod...." Read more

Customers are mixed about the scope. Some mention it's a great product, while others say it'll make the unit unusable.

"...The telescope overall seems to have nice power and quality to it, but the mount is terrible...." Read more

"...quality of the tripod and travel bag are not great but the tripod is slightly better than the one that came with the knockoff...." Read more

"...The tripod it comes with is barely adequate . It works best if placed on a sturdy table with the legs extended just far enough to make it less tippy...." Read more

"The telescope is great . Super light and easy to use.I upgraded the spotting scope to one with the laser...." Read more

Customers are mixed about the performance of the telescope. Some mention that it works great for more local purposes, and does decently well. However, others say that it never worked, has poor quality, and doesn't work well for astronomy.

"...noticed when we changed the eyepice, the set-screw is stripped and does nothing ...." Read more

"...They have enough eye relief that They work ok with my eyeglasses , but I prefer to take my glasses off when looking thru the scope...." Read more

"...with the scope is intended for terrestrial viewing and does not work well for Astronomy ...." Read more

"...Triangle piece doesn’t look like the picture. iPhone doesn’t work with eye piece . Have to look up on YouTube to put it together correctly." Read more

Customers find the telescope difficult to move. They mention that it wobbles a lot, and the motion is not smooth. They also say that the tripod does not lock in for positioning up and down.

"Affordable…. But run far away. It’s very unstable (image wise), doesn’t move with ease , and the slightest movement, air, or blink will shift the..." Read more

"The tripod does not lock in for positioning up and down. Very flimsy to begin with...." Read more

"...Scope didn’t hold up with the flimsy tripod and nothing stayed still when you adjusted ...." Read more

"...and it was easy to set up but I have been having trouble getting the telescope to stay on the stars/planets...." Read more

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Celestron Travel Scope 70 DX Telescope 22035

Celestron Travel Scope 70 DX Telescope 22035

Product Features

  • A portable telescope kit with everything you need to get started: 70mm refractor telescope with fully coated glass optics, full height tripod, travel backpack, plus lots more

Buy From Amazon

Price: 23633.83 inr *, discount: 36 % *, mrp: 37149.04 *, technical details, compare this product with other similar products.

celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

Products Comparison

Product info.

  • ★ Color: Gray/Black
  • ★ Size: 70 DX with Backpack
  • ★ Dimentions(H*W*L): 9.1 * 3.3 * 9.1
  • ★ ReleaseDate: 09/02/2022 00:00:01
  • ★ NumberOfItems: 1

Manufecturing Info

  • ★ Model: 22035
  • ★ Warranty: 1 year manufacturer
  • ★ ItemPartNumber: 22035

Check the price at Amazon

Price: 23633.83 inr, discount: 36 %, mrp: 37149.04, related contents.

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  • Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Best of Moscow by high speed train

By shuguley , February 15, 2014 in Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Recommended Posts

Cool Cruiser

Sure would appreciate someone who has taken "Best of Moscow by high speed train" from St. Petersburg could please share their impressions of this shore excursion. From the description this sounds like a very long day.

Wondering how the 4 hour train trip was in terms of accommodations, etc. Also what time did you leave the ship and what time at night did you return? Were both legs of the trip on the high speed rail (I read that slower trains also travel the same tracks)?

My wife and I are considering this excursion. We thought that if we are making all the effort to go to Russia then how could we pass up going to Moscow, walking in Red Square, seeing St. Basil, etc.

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If you are considering this on the 2015 June Baltic cruise on Voyager; my suggestion is don't. There is so much to do in St. Petersburg and although a train is one of my favorite ways to travel the time would be far better spent in St. P.

Thanks for the advice. Yes, this would be on the Voyager during the 2015 season but not yet sure exactly which cruise.

5,000+ Club

We did the Moscow excursion "on a different luxury line", but from your brief description it sounds very much like the same trip, so I will operate on that assumption. It is a VERY long day! We left the ship at 5:30 AM and returned at 12:30 AM. The highspeed train trip is comfortable, and while they call it "Business Class" it does not compare well to the equivalent class on say Rail Europe. When we did it in 2011, we did have highspeed both ways, and the trip back seemed much longer as the adrenaline and excitement had worn off!:D

Moscow itself is not that terribly different from any other big city in the world, but this Cold War kid never thought he would ever stand in Red Square, never mind walk the grounds of The Kremlin, or tour The Kremlin Palace, or see (but not visit) Lenin's Tomb, or visit The Armoury. But he did, and he loved every minute of it! Yes, it is a long day, and you barely scratch a scratch on the surface, but it is worth it. There is a tremendous amount to see in St. Petersburg, but every Baltic cruise goes to St. Petersburg, so you can go back if you choose to. Not every cruiseline offers you the chance to see Moscow.

RachelG

I have not personally done this tour, but our last time in St Petersburg, the private guide that we hired for a day was leading the regent tour to Moscow on the high speed train the next day. He said it was way better than the previous alternative, which was flying to Moscow and back. He said that you actually got to Moscow faster because you didn't have to deal with airline checkin etc. it did seem like a very long day to me, and there is so much to see and do in st. Petersburg that I didn't consider doing it.

countflorida

countflorida

We toured to Moscow from St. Petersburg via the hi-speed SAPSAN train last September, from a Baltic cruise on the Oceania Marina. You need to have a two-night, three day port call in St. Petersburg to take this tour because the tour typically leaves the ship around 5:00 - 5:30 AM and doesn't return until after midnight the next day. We didn't take the ship's tour; we made private arrangements with TravelAllRussia for three days of touring, the first and third days in St. Petersburg and the second day the tour to Moscow by train. Our cost for the private tour for three days was about the same as what the ship charged for the excursion to Moscow alone. There are a number of private tour agencies that operate in St. Petersburg and offer the Moscow train tours; we would strongly recommend them over the ship's tours.

All three days had private guides with car and driver. The second day, the driver picked us up at the ship and took us to the train, but we were alone on the train, and met in Moscow by the guide on the station platform. After our tour and dinner, we were brought back to the train and after the return train trip met by the driver and taken back to the ship. Because you are alone on the train you must have your own Russian visas.

If this is your first visit to St. Petersburg, I would agree there is much more to see there. We found Moscow somewhat a disappointment, particularly Red Square. The Kremlin and the cathedral in Red Square were also worth seeing. But the best thing we saw was the Moscow subway! I worked for the Washington Metro system back in the 1980s as it grew from 40 to 80 miles and although I was in the computer area, I learned a lot about the challenges of running a subway system. We used the Moscow system to get across the city from where we had dinner to the train station, and I was amazed at the cleanliness', speed of operation, the short headways maintained, and the courtesy of everyone involved. A very impressive experience!

We had been to St. Petersburg before, and so had the time to take a day and go to Moscow. Also, I really like trains, and the SAPSAN is a German train set running on Russian rails. Seats are like first class domestic air, spacious but not too plush or comfortable, but with enough room. Not too much recline, and almost 8 hours on the train in two shots is a lot for an old man. They come through and sell drinks, candy, etc. but the sellers don't speak English and no one around us helped, so we had just poor coffee once coming, and brought stuff with us for the trip back. Not too much to see from the train either, particularly on the return when it is night the whole way.

If you decide to go, take a private tour and avoid the overly expensive ship's tour. I'm glad we did it, but wouldn't bother to repeat the tour; we've seen Moscow.

Thanks so much to all of you for the thorough and thought insight. Yhe information you have provided is most helpful.

countflorida: Your detailed post is very helpful. We are not quite ready for a Baltic cruise but should do so within a year. Time enough to do our pre travel research, bookings and visa gathering.:) Thank you!

Emperor Norton

Emperor Norton

Sure would appreciate someone who has taken "Best of Moscow by high speed train" from St. Petersburg could please share their impressions of this shore excursion. From the description this sounds like a very long day.   Wondering how the 4 hour train trip was in terms of accommodations, etc. Also what time did you leave the ship and what time at night did you return? Were both legs of the trip on the high speed rail (I read that slower trains also travel the same tracks)?   My wife and I are considering this excursion. We thought that if we are making all the effort to go to Russia then how could we pass up going to Moscow, walking in Red Square, seeing St. Basil, etc.

I did this on Seabourn. IMO DONT. Take Aeroflop (er Aeroflot). The train has non folding seats where you are literally knee to knee with your fellow passenger (facing each other). Further they don't believe in air conditioning. It's also the worlds slowed bullet train. I think I would have found more enjoyment wandering around the St. Petersburg and Moscow airports.

Countflorida,

This is a little off topic,, however we had planned a river cruise in Russia but decided we would rather stay on land and have booked about two weeks with Travel-All-Russia using the private guide and driver. I'm curious as to how you found them as a tour company.

The guides they provided were fine. We had a different guide each of the days in St. Petersburg, but both were flexible, pleasant, knowledgeable and spoke English very well, as did the guide in Moscow, incidentally. She was a bit aloof, distant, not too friendly, but otherwise fine. In fact, she was the one who suggested taking the Metro, which unexpectedly became one of the highlights of the Moscow excursion. If I have a complaint with AllTravelRussia, it is with their plan and its execution (more later).

I had requested emphasis on World War II (in Russia, the Great Patriotic War) sites and info. In scheduling us, they weren't careful about dates and a couple of the sites we wanted to see were scheduled on the third day, after we'd been to Moscow. But both sites were closed that day of the week, and that info was readily available, right on web sites describing them. Also, the included meals (lunches in St. Pete, dinner in Moscow) were not what we asked for: light meals with some choices, so we could avoid things we didn't like and choose things we did like. My request was ignored; we were given full Russian meals with a fixed menu, no choice. On the first day, a fish dish was the entre, but I am allergic to fish. Fortunately, I had the e-mail I'd sent with me and showed it to the guide, and she was able to change my entre to chicken, which was very good actually. But we didn't want a 3-4 course lunches or dinner (in Moscow). We had the guide drop the lunch the third day, although we never got any credit or refund. But, particularly in contrast to the ship's tours, the prices were so reasonable we didn't worry too much about it.

The people who were on the ship's tour to Moscow saw us boarding the same train for which they were forced to queue up and wait on the way back, and asked us what we had done. I was candid and open so they were not happy when I explained what we had arranged and particularly what it had cost. Also, when we returned to the ship, we found they had laid on a late supper for those who had gone to Moscow, so up we went and had something. Well, it turns out the late supper was supposed to be just for those on the ship's tour, but we and others on 'independent' tours, there were a dozen or more of us, crashed the party, actually got there first, and they didn't realize it until the larger group arrived and there weren't enough tables/places set. By that time, the 'independents' had all gotten served and were eating; what could they do?

A couple from the larger group sat down with us and asked us about our tour, and they were the ones I told about our arrangement and its cost. They turned to others who’d been with them and announced the details, loudly enough so the whole room heard, which started a lot of bitching and complaining. I gathered they weren't very happy with the ship's tour to begin with, and this was the straw that broke the camel's back. We finished up and beat it out of there, but overheard later that one of the excursion staff came to check on something and ran into a real mess. I caught a cold on the trip, which forced me to bed the second day following in Tallinn, so by the time we reappeared we heard about the contretemps' but apparently no one recalled who started it, thankfully.

Because of what happened to us, I would probably not use AllTravelRussia if I were to go again, or if I did, I would be sure to get confirmation of every detail of the tour. They do have good reviews generally, and we were certainly helped by their visa department and liked the guides and drivers. Their weakness, I say now with full 20:20 hindsight, is that once the sales person who plans the tour, sells it to you and collects your money, he (or she) transfers the plan to their Russia office for implementation; there is no follow-up to make sure it gets done right. And that is where our problems arose; we paid for a custom tour but got a standard package with a few destinations switched, and no one checked them out, even to see when they were open the day we were scheduled to go. If you check every detail that’s important to you, it should be OK, but that’s a hell of a way to have to do business, in my opinion.

Thank you for the 20/20 hindsight observation on your Russian tour operator, and better priced than the ship's excursion cost.

Thanks very much for the feedback.

We had the same experience as you so far as price. We originally booked a Viking Cruise but, hearing some things about the river cruises that made us unhappy, looked into other options. T-A-R cost the same or less than a cruise and had us in hotels for 11 days. We opted for the private tour. They have three tour levels, based on hotels. We originally opted for the four star as it did not cost much more than the three star hotels. Finally we decided to throw it all in and upgraded to five star. In Moscow we will be at the newly opened Kempinsky which is two blocks from Red Square. In St. Petersburg it is the Grand Hotel Europe, one of the most vaunted luxury hotels in Russia. Location is important for us as the tours use up only part of the day so being in the center of everything for our independent touring is important. As with many other cities, the less you pay, the farther out of the center of town you are.

We have been working with our salesman in D.C. and he seems to get back to us with the changes we want. He recently returned from Russia so is up on everything. When I asked they said they paid the full TA commission if I wanted so I got my usual TA on board so he is watching our back and giving us that extra level of comfort. He also set up our air, which I know pays him little or nothing, and got us business class for much less than T-A-R wanted for economy, though it took working for a while with a consolidator. He's happy to get his 10 percent on this trip without having booked it. He also took care of the trip insurance. We've been doing a lot of research on the CC sister site Trip Advisor and will write a report there. We will, I guess, become a source of info for CC members after having spent 5 days in Moscow and 6 in SP.

  • 4 months later...

scubacruiserx2

scubacruiserx2

Anybody considering a day trip to Moscow from St. Petersburg on the Sapsan may want to look at our travelogue filled with pictures.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1927687

greygypsy

Very informative. Thanks dor sharing. Jeff

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NCM Moscow Electric Bike Review

NCM Moscow electric bike

When you purchase through links on our website, we may earn a commission. Affiliate disclosure.

NCM make high-quality, but affordable electric bikes. In this review, I will explain why I believe the NCM Moscow is one of the best budget electric mountain bikes.

About NCM Electric bikes

NCM Bikes, founded in 2014, have quickly become one of the largest electric bike brands in Europe, the parent company, Leon Cycle GmbH is a German company based in Hanover. Their e-bikes are designed in Germany and manufactured in China.

This great e-bike is now available in the US with a higher power output 500w motor and a top speed of 20mph. The NCM Moscow Plus has a high capacity 48v 16ah battery, Tektro hydraulic disc brakes and Suntour XCM forks with 100mm travel.  This model uses the more advanced C7 LCD with increased functionality and has 24-speed gears with Shimano Crankset and Acera 8-speed rear mech. There is also a throttle fitted.

I have ridden the EU spec version and that was fairly nippy, so I would imagine with double the power on tap this US version is an absolute joy to ride!

banner

EU Specification

The centrepiece of this Electric bike is the DAS-Kit X15 geared rear hub motor: This durable 250W rear electric hub motor is known for its efficiency and high torque output. It offers a reduction ratio of 1:5 and a maximum torque of 55 Nm, which is excellent for such a small motor. This German-designed hub motor punches above its weight and it is refreshing to see such a high-quality unit on an affordable e-bike.

das-kit x15 250 watt electric bike hub motor

48v13ah Lithium battery pack with USB charging port for mobile devices:  Usually, electric bike battery packs take up a considerable amount of space in the frame, but the Moscow’s battery is integrated into the down tube of the bike, keeping the weight low and central, which helps to improve stability. The claimed maximum range of 75 miles seems a little optimistic, but possible if the pedal assist is used wisely. The total battery energy capacity is 624wh (watt hours), so if you were consuming 20wh per mile, your range would be 31 miles. My friend owns one of these bikes and gets an average range of around 40-50 miles.

48v 13ah lithium battery pack fits neatly into the ncm moscow's frame and has a usb charger for mobile devices

This is a rugged bike built for the road less travelled:  This is an excellent bike for weekend adventures on trails and gravel tracks. The Suntour XCT front forks have 100mm of travel, which is more than adequate for light off-road riding, and the excellent Schwalbe Smart Sam all-terrain tyres provide grip where it’s needed. The gel saddle is comfortable enough, and the Velo ergonomic handlebar grips not only look great but feel great too!  Gearing is the dependable Shimano Altus 21-speed, and all the gears are indexed perfectly as expected.

ncm moscow electric bike review

Multi-function LCD : The Das-Kit LCD gives you all the information you would expect, including journey time and mileage. It also has 6 power levels of pedal assist, so you can fine-tune the power output to suit your needs.

NCM Moscow electric bike lcd display

Excellent build quality:  One thing that has always impressed me with NCM Electric bikes is the consistency of the build quality. The NCM Moscow is no exception. It looks great, but there is no compromise on functionality and safety.  The Tektro mechanical disc brakes with 160mm rotors provide predictable braking and the brake levers incorporate motor cut-off switches to ensure safe riding.

NCM Moscow electric bike dimensions

The NCM Moscow electric bike offers exceptional value for money. I have tested NCM’s other bikes and this one is no exception. They all offer a lot for the price. The specification is excellent and it is good to see a 48v battery fitted to a 250w bike. This battery is the same capacity as the Milano I reviewed previously and a realistic range of between 30-45 miles, or 31 miles using the 20wh per mile calculation, should be expected. The claimed range of 75 miles may be a little optimistic for everyday use – but it depends on how much you use the electric assist.

The Tektro Mechanical disc brakes provide adequate and predictable stopping power, while the Schwalbe Smart Sam tyres will provide sure-footed grip on a variety of surfaces, as well as a reasonable amount of puncture protection.

It is good to see an integrated battery pack on an e-bike of this price, it does finish the bike off nicely.

As far as electric mountain bikes go, the NCM Moscow is excellent. Not only is it well-made, but it has a decent battery and an excellent motor.

I serviced one of these for a customer last Summer and had to take it for a short test ride.  I was impressed with the way the small motor effortlessly handled the steep Cornish hills. The beefy 29er tyres handled the potholes and bumps of the back lanes with ease.

I had previously ridden the Milano model and there are a lot of obvious similarities. The Milano is made with the daily commuter in mind, whereas the Moscow is geared more toward the recreational rider, who will be venturing off-road more often. If I had to choose between the two, I would go for the Moscow, simply because it has that ‘go anywhere’ feel, and if you decided to use it as an everyday commuter bike, there are provisions to fit mudguards and a rack.

quality shimano altus 21-speed gears fitted to the ncm moscow

As with all the other NCM bikes I have reviewed, I rate this bike. It has to be the best-value electric mountain bike on the market at the moment.

The great thing about this bike is that the build quality is excellent. It feels very rugged and durable, although I would err on the side of caution when taking it off the beaten track. It is not a high-end mountain bike and isn’t designed to take the rigours of extreme downhill riding. The suspension forks are fine for rough surfaces and a few small potholes, but nothing too harsh like rocks and logs.

If you are in the market for an affordable off-road e-bike, then this ticks all the right boxes.

If you are looking for a more commuter-orientated bike check out my review of the Milano . If your budget doesn’t quite stretch to the NMC Moscow, It would be worth looking at the NCM Prague Electric Mountain Bik e .

celestron travel scope 70 dx 22035 review

Meet Tony, a passionate e-bike advocate and enthusiast who discovered the life-changing benefits of electric bikes back in 2016. Tony’s technical experience within the e-bike field was gained while running a successful electric bike conversion business for 5 years in his home county of Cornwall, UK.

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39 Comments

Vrai 1er test aujourd’hui du NCM Moscow 48v 13 Ah 26″ 1ere génération : Ballade prévue avec un copain : 55 km et 1000 de dénivelé, jusqu’au col de l’oeillon (massif du pilat – Loire) sur petites routes et chemin. Déjà fait avec VAE à 1000 eur et sa batterie de 500 W pour comparer. La batterie m’avait ramené alors pile à la maison, mais tout juste vidée (donc 55 km et 1000 m). Malheureusement, aujourd’hui, la batterie de mon tout beau tout neuf NCM moscow 1ere génération m’a laché au bout de 32 km, 500 m avant le col. J’ai fait le retour au molet (heureusemnt 90% de descente au retour). Donc 6 barres de batterie au départ, 5 au bout de 12 km, 4 à 20 km, 3, puis 2 barres en qq km seulement. Les 2 barres restantes ont tenus les 5 derniers km. Pour moi, pas normal du tout. Je pèse 65 kgs et j’ai sollicité modérément l’assistance : essentiellement vitesse 2 et 3 dans les cotes. J’ai sollicité le sav Decathlon aujourd’hui et j’attends sa réponse. Donc difficile de noter ce vélo en l’état des choses, car par ailleurs, il possède qq atouts : solidité apparente, confort (j’ai qd meme mis une selle confort), prix, look, poignée confort, béquille et sonnette rigolote (mais ça, c’est pas cher à rajouter), mais aussi qq défauts : poids lourds 27 kgs, dérailleurs avt et arrière déréglés (pas si grave), disque avt très légèrement voilé (frotement), grincement du frein avant (sur 10 kms de descente, ça saoule), pneu ultra fin. J’ai eu le bonheur de créver à l’arrière (pas de pot qd même !), réparation sans pb, mais j’ai alors constaté la finesse de l’épaisseur du caoutchouc des pneus. Une simple epine l’avait traversé. Mais bon, il semblerait que c’est de la bonne marque. Il manque réellement sur le web de vrai test sur la durée, en particulier sur l’autonomie réelle d’un VAE. Pour moi, sauf si le sav me confirme qu’il y a problème et remplace ma batterie, je ne recommande pas ce VAE pour de la rando de 50 Km, au risque de rentrer avec les mollets, sauf si plat.

Merci de partager vos expériences avec le NCM de Moscou, très apprécié.

Hello, Je rentre de ma 1ere vraie sortie avec le NCM Moscow 1ere génération (blanc 26″, 48V 13 Ah). 55 km – 1000 m de dénivelé – Mon poids plume : 65 Kgs – Niveau d’assistance utilisé : modéré. Points – : – Niveau de batterie peu fiable. 1 barre en moins au bout de 15 km – 2eme barre à 20 km – 3 et 4 eme barre entre 25 et 30 km (!) – Les 2 dernières barres sont tombés ensemble à 32 km, en haut du sommet. J’ai fait le retour sans batterie, et c’est dur. J’ai signalé à Decathlon, qui j’espère fera le nécessaire auprès de Leon Cycles. – Tous les réglages sont à reprendre : freins, dérailleurs. Mais bon, ça, c’est rien. – 1ère sortie, 1 ére crevaison, à l’arrière. J’ai pu réparer sans problème sans démonter la roue. Juste sortir la chambre à air roue montée et repérer le trou. Mais ça m’a donné l’occasion de constater que les pneus sont ultra fins (pourtant vtt). Une simple petite épine à traverser le pneu. On va dire pas de chance.

Points + : le confort est là. je mets pour le moment 3/10 pour la fiabilité. Si une nouvelle batterie règle le problème, j’aurai tendance à noter 7/10. A voir dans le temps.

Hello, I have just purchased the NCM Moscow 26″ 1st generation. I am desperately looking for a rack that fits. Do you have a reference? Thank you in advance for your help.

Bonjour, je viens d’acheter le NCM Moscow 26″ 1erer génération. Je cherche désespérément un porte bagage qui s’adapte. avez vous une référence ? Merci à l’avance pour votre aide.

I’ve seen the Topeak MTX Beam rack fitted to the Moscow. It clamps on to the seat post and is a good quality rack.

Regards, Tony

Je réponds à moi meme pour ceux que ça interesserait : j’ai pu adapter mon porte bagage, en rajoutant des entretoises de 15 mm au niveau des vis coté moyeu arrière.

BOnjour, Je pense sauter le pas et acheter le moscow, bien qu’il ne reste plus en ce moment que le 26″. Souhaitant investir dans une tige de selle telescopique, pouvez vous me donner le diametre de la tige de selle svp ? merci d’avance

Le NCM Moscou a une tige de selle de 30,9 mm. La meilleure tige de selle à suspension est la Suntour SP-12 NCX .

Salutations, Tony

I got my Moscow Plus last September and yesterday took it out for my 20th weekly ride from San Francisco across the bridge into the Marin Headlands, usually just over a 33 mile ride. I’m 71 and it is a work out but I don’t ride to work out. I ride to get out into nature. The seat crumbed under me within two months of getting it but some duct take fixed it perfectly. The fixture that has the key slot to use to fit in the battery came loose when I had a flat tire fixed but aside from being loose when the battery is not in it, still works perfectly. The tires handle the sharp rocks on some of the trails. The gas throttle, the bike’s gas pump, is dangerous at first. I learned to turn off the power before taking the bike down stair ramps and before wheeling it into my basement. The bike jumps out of your hands if you touch that throttle while your standing on the ground. Had a bad accident last November on a steep incline when I grabbed the handlebar to stop the bike sliding away under me and it shot off when I accidentally touched the throttle. Me, the bike and my iPad all fell and shattered in different directions. The rear derailleur was jammed into the back wheel so the wheels wouldn’t turn and I didn’t have a tool on me miles away from civilization. But 10 minutes later another cyclist with a mini tool saved the day. So carry that sack of tools they send to assemble the bike when you ride it. You never know when you’ll need them. Sharp turns are almost impossible for me on this bike but wow I love it!!! I can cycle up and down trails till the cows come home. Trails I never could cycle up before. Love that! A super great buy and I’m so glad I got it. And they had super great customer service to help me learn how to use the charger. Did I mention I’d never used an ebike before?

Hi Charlie,

Thanks for sharing your experiences, glad you’re out there enjoying your bike👍

All the best, Tony

Bought my new Moscow bike from Amazon but not long before I had problems with coffee grinder noise and serious vibration, found the cable from the controller to the back wheel had been routed too close to the drive sprocket and had chafed through causing broken wires and short circuits. Leon cycles Germany took the wheel back, but no better, a new controller followed, no better, they then told me I needed a new back wheel and motor, or a rebuilt motor, but due to Brexit they could not help any more. I now have a bike which will run perfectly when running but can take 20+ attempts to get started without grating and vibrating. Can anybody help?

I know this is an old review but I thought I’d ask my question anyway. If it get a reply, good; if not, that’s OK too. I bought a Moscow Plus late in 2020. It’s worked out very well for me. Now that I’ve owned it for a while and gotten the feel of it I’ve worked my riding stamina up to where I’m ready to ride farther and farther out. I love to fish so at some point I hope to make the trek to my nearest trout fishing stream which is approximately 30 or so miles one way. The terrain to get there is generally flat ground with one long stretch of about a mile and a half being a good downhill grade.

For an earth-bound bike rider that’s as close to flying as I’m ever going to get but, I temper that with the knowledge that on the way back I’ll have to hump it a bit to get back up that hill.

All of that to ask; Has anyone that you know of ever ridden their Moscow Plus starting with a full charge, on battery power alone to see exactly how far it would take them on generally flat terrain?

I plan on purchasing a spare OEM battery latter on this year so I won’t be able to do this battery endurance test until I have that spare battery to get me back home. In the mean time I just though I’d ask if anyone has already done this type of test. I could save me the trouble of doing it myself.

Thanks. Tim M.

Buying a new battery, if you can find one is £500.00 plus a bit, so if I were you I would stay close to home and do circuits for for a couple of hours at a time until the battery runs out of power, then walk back home using the walk mode ( there should be enough left in the battery to do that).

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Moscow State Symphony brings muscle to choice program at Kravis Center

By Lawrence Budmen

Pavel Kogan conducted the Moscow State Symphony Orchestra Wednesday afternoon at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach.

Pavel Kogan conducted the Moscow State Symphony Orchestra Wednesday afternoon at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach.

Russian orchestras usually present formulaic programs when touring, especially in South Florida. An overture or ballet suite will be followed by a Tchaikovsky or Rachmaninoff concerto as a showcase for the soloist. Then the performance will conclude with one of Tchaikovsky’s last three symphonies or Rachmaninoff’s 2nd or Shostakovich’s 5th Symphony—flashy scores guaranteed to generate cheers.

The Moscow State Symphony took a refreshingly different approach for its Regional Arts series concert Wednesday afternoon at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach. The blockbuster concerto was indeed played but it was surrounded by an early Rachmaninoff curio and a grandly romantic symphony by the young Alexander Scriabin.

Subtlety is not this orchestra’s strong point. It makes a big corporate sound and seldom plays a true pianissimo. While not quite in the top tier of Russian ensembles, it is several levels above many of the uneven Russian orchestras that have played South Florida in recent seasons. 

The strings produce a sizable, dark tone. Winds display that veiled sonority that is typical in many Russian and Eastern European orchestras but the flute and clarinet principals are first rate. The brass are especially well blended, bereft of the raucousness that characterized many Soviet era orchestras. 

Pavel Kogan, son of the famed violinist Leonid Kogan, has been the orchestra’s music director since 1989 and he is the perfect conductor for this group. Leading with an unusually long baton, Kogan is a fiery presence on the podium. He brings out this orchestra’s gleam and tonal power for all it is worth.

The program opened with The Rock, a brief tone poem by the twenty-year-old Rachmaninoff. The nine-minute score is dedicated to Rimsky-Korsakov (one of Rachmaninoff’s teachers) and much of the work sounds like rejected outtakes from that composer’s Scheherazade or Antar Symphony. Kogan managed to bring a degree of coherence to a rather episodic essay by a composer who has not yet found his voice.

Dmitry Masleev

Dmitry Masleev

Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor served as a vehicle for Dmitry Masleev, top prize winner of the Tchaikovsky Competition in 2015. This was no ordinary traversal of an oft-programmed warhorse. Playing at competition standard, Masleev charged through the first movement, displaying a steel-fingered monster technique. His playing was not merely a metronomic display at top volume. There was a visceral charge to his performance that made one sit up and listen. He brought Lisztian fury to the first movement cadenza and the barn-burning Allegro con fuoco finale was fleet indeed.

Yet Masleev could also produce finely shaded soft tones and he made the melodic lines of the Andantino semplice really sing. Kogan’s clear beat kept the ensemble in pace with Masleev, which was no small accomplishment, and his detailing of the wind lines was especially strong.

Masleev had the usually unresponsive Kravis matinee audience on their feet cheering and he responded with a transcription of the “Elegy” from Shostakovich’s Ballet Suite No. 3 as an encore. Playing with surprising delicacy, he beautifully dovetailed the haunting melody in the right hand with Chopinesque filigree in the left. Definitely an über virtuoso, Masleev clearly has many facets and it will be interesting to hear him in less flamboyant works.

Scriabin was one of music’s most original creative artists but his Symphony No. 2 in C minor predates his experiments with atonality, mysticism and tonal synesthesia. The five movement, 47-minute work owes much to the  symphonic tradition of Tchaikovsky. Yet an original voice lurks beneath the thick string textures and brass chorales. There are moments when overt bombast holds sway but there is much inspired melodic writing and superb orchestration in this rarely played work which is clearly superior to the symphonies of Glazunov or Glière which sometimes find their way onto orchestral programs.

The richly burnished tone of Evgeny Solovey’s clarinet captured the melancholy aura of the initial Andante. In the second movement Allegro, Kogan marshaled his forces to pile one climax upon another. The shimmer of Aleey Mazur’s flute against enveloping strings melded into  a full-scale  romantic melody right out of Hollywood in the best sense during the third movement. Kogan whipped up a pounding storm in the Tempestoso. The brass fanfare that opens the final Maestoso is a transformation of the moody theme that opened the symphony. Kogan’s full-throttle reading avoided vulgarity while highlighting his ensemble’s corporate impact and color.

For encores Kogan offered an unabashedly brash version of the Waltz from the Masquerade Suite by Khachaturian that did not attempt elegance where there was none and a witty, mock big-band romp through Shostakovich’s Tahiti Trot (after Vincent Youmans’ “Tea for Two”).

The Regional Arts Concert Series continues with pianist Vadym Kholodenko playing Tchaikovsky’s Sonata in G Major and Theme and Variations in F minor, and Scriabin’s Two Poèmes, and Sonatas Nos. 4 and 5 December 4 at 2 p.m. at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach.  kravis.org

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  2. A must have for the range. Spotting Scope

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  4. UNBOXING Celestron Travel Scope 50 #telescope #livestreaming #unboxing #barlow #lens #astronomy

  5. Opening and Setting Up My Celestron Travel Scope 70 Telescope

  6. Product Review: Celestron C70 Mini Mak Spotting Scope. 2022-11-13

COMMENTS

  1. Celestron Travel Scope 70 Review [Should You Buy It?]

    The Celestron Travel Scope 70 is perfect for beginning stargazers, travelers, and anyone who wants an easy-to-use grab-and-go telescope, such as young kids. The manual alt-azimuth mount and accessories like the finderscope make pointing and tracking objects straightforward. Total beginners will appreciate how intuitive it is to use.

  2. Celestron Travel Scope 70 Telescope Review

    Aperture: 70 mm/2.8". Focal Length: 400 mm/15.74". Focal Ratio: f/5.7. Eyepieces Included: 20 mm, 10 mm. Our Verdict: I like that the Travel Scope 70 is designed specifically to be a take-and-go, portable telescope for both terrestrial and celestial viewing. It is great for the observer who wants a short-focus and wide-field telescope on a ...

  3. Review: Celestron TravelScope 70 Telescope

    The TravelScope 70 has an achromatic lens objective with an aperture of 70mm and a focal length of 400mm. Its lens elements are nicely coated without bright reflections. My impression is that, for the money, this is a pretty great objective lens. It won't hold up to any 70mm Apochromat, but you get what you pay for.

  4. Celestron 70mm Travel Scope Review

    SUMMARY. The Celestron 70mm Travel Scope is a reasonably good low cost unit intended for daytime viewing and casual astronomical observation. The package is light and compact, primarily designed for travel. All components can be stored in the backpack, which has enough room for accessories.

  5. Amazon.com: Customer reviews: Celestron

    Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Celestron - 70mm Travel Scope DX - Portable Refractor Telescope - Fully-Coated Glass Optics - Ideal Telescope for Beginners - Bonus Astronomy Software Package - Digiscoping Smartphone Adapter at Amazon.com. Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.

  6. Celestron

    Celestron - 70mm Travel Scope DX - Portable Refractor Telescope - Fully-Coated Glass Optics - Ideal Telescope for Beginners - BONUS Astronomy Software Packag...

  7. Travel Scope 70 DX Portable Telescope with Smartphone Adapter

    During the day, Travel Scope 70 DX doubles as a spotting scope. Enjoy amazing views of birds, wildlife, boats on the water, migrating whales, and so much more. The entire telescope kit weighs just 3.3 pounds, so you can take it anywhere, hassle-free. Smartphone adapter and Bluetooth shutter release. Create your own stunning images and video of ...

  8. Celestron Travel Scope 70DX

    The Celestron Travel Scope 70DX is a 70mm aperture refractor telescope from Celestron that is part of the Travel Scope Series which also include the original Travel Scope 70 (that has been a best-seller for years) and the Celestron Travel Scope 60DX.This is the ideal purchase for a beginner that is looking for a portable telescope that comes with a backpack and smartphone adapter equipped with ...

  9. Celestron Travel Scope 70

    Buy the Travel Scope 70 here ( affiliate link ): https://www.amazon.com/shop/ideascreationsinventions/list/A37SUVGFXMNN?ref_=cm_sw_r_cp_ud_aipsflist_aipsfide...

  10. Celestron

    If you are looking for a portable and affordable refractor telescope, you might want to check out the Celestron - 70mm Travel Scope DX. This telescope features fully-coated glass optics, a bonus astronomy software package, and a digiscoping smartphone adapter that lets you capture stunning images of the night sky. Whether you are a beginner or a seasoned stargazer, you can enjoy the wonders of ...

  11. Celestron 70mm Travel Scope Review!

    Want to see photos from a $90 Celestron telescope? I did some astrophotography with my new toy. After a few weeks, I have the pros and cons of this product f...

  12. Reviews for Celestron Travel Scope 70 DX Portable Telescope

    Read page 1 of our customer reviews for more information on the Celestron Travel Scope 70 DX Portable Telescope. ... Model # 22035Store SKU # 1005515760. Hover Image to Zoom. Travel Scope 70 DX Portable Telescope ... View Full Product Details. Customer Reviews. 1. out of 1 reviews. 0 % recommend this product; 5 0. 4 0. 3 0. 2 0. 1 1. Write a ...

  13. Celestron Travel Scope 70 DX Telescope 22035

    ‎Celestron : Manufacturer ‎Celestron, Celestron, 2835 Columbia St #3877, Torrance, CA 90503, United States : Model ‎22035 : Model Name ‎22035 : Product Dimensions ‎23.11 x 23.11 x 23.11 cm; 1.5 Kilograms : Item model number ‎22035 : Compatible Devices

  14. Celestron Travel Scope DX 70mm f/6 AZ Refractor Telescope

    Buy Celestron Travel Scope DX 70mm f/6 AZ Refractor Telescope featuring 70mm Achromatic Refractor, Anti-Reflection Fully Coated Optics, 1.25" Rack-and-Pinion Focuser, Smartphone Digiscoping Adapter, Bluetooth Remote Phone Shutter Release, Manual Alt-Azimuth Mount with Lock, 40x & 20x Eyepieces, Moon Filter, 2x Barlow Lens and Erecting Prism, Aluminum Photo-Style Tripod, Backpack Holds OTA ...

  15. Best of Moscow by high speed train

    We toured to Moscow from St. Petersburg via the hi-speed SAPSAN train last September, from a Baltic cruise on the Oceania Marina. You need to have a two-night, three day port call in St. Petersburg to take this tour because the tour typically leaves the ship around 5:00 - 5:30 AM and doesn't return until after midnight the next day.

  16. NCM Moscow Electric Bike Review

    This great e-bike is now available in the US with a higher power output 500w motor and a top speed of 20mph. The NCM Moscow Plus has a high capacity 48v 16ah battery, Tektro hydraulic disc brakes and Suntour XCM forks with 100mm travel. This model uses the more advanced C7 LCD with increased functionality and has 24-speed gears with Shimano ...

  17. Travel Scope 70 Portable Telescope

    The Travel Scope 70 is a refractor telescope perfect for terrestrial and celestial viewing on the go. The Travel Scope can view the planets, moon, star clusters and brighter deep sky objects like the Orion Nebula and Andromeda Galaxy at night and with the erect image star diagonal makes the optical tube ideal for using as a spotting scope during the day.

  18. Celestron

    Celestron's award-winning Nature DX binocular gets a major upgrade with the addition of ED objective lenses. NEW: Elements ThermoTank 3 On the trail, at the job site, in the classroom, or simply sitting at home relaxing - the Celestron Elements ThermoTank 3 will keep your hands toasty.

  19. South Florida Classical Review » » Moscow State Symphony brings muscle

    The Classical Review; Moscow State Symphony brings muscle to choice program at Kravis Center. By Lawrence Budmen. Pavel Kogan conducted the Moscow State Symphony Orchestra Wednesday afternoon at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach. Russian orchestras usually present formulaic programs when touring, especially in South Florida. An overture or ...