Dogs Travel Guide

Taking A Dog To France: Rules & Requirements

Before booking your holiday for you and your dog it’s always best to do some research first to learn more about the Rules & Requirements for taking a dog to France .

When traveling to France with your dog you will need to go through some security checks first, this is the same for any pet that’s traveling abroad.

Any dogs that are coming from any non-EU countries, must go through Border Inspection Posts at international airports into France.

Your dog will be examined before he or she enters France. Non-vaccinated puppies or dogs are strictly forbidden to enter France, regardless of their EU membership.

Taking A Dog To France Rules & Requirements

For any dogs that are traveling to France, you will need to follow the EU rules set out below

  • Your dog must have a  microchip
  • You must have a valid  EU pet passport .
  • Your dog will need to be vaccinated against rabies

You must wait 21 days from the date of their first rabies vaccination before travelling with your dogs to France or any other EU member state.

Flying With Your Dog To France

When you are planning on taking your dog to France there are some Airline requirements you need to take into consideration before booking your flight.

Related Article

  •  10 Airlines that accept dogs in the cabin 

Air France Flights  allow dogs and other pets that are under  8kg of weight  this includes the dog carrier, with maximum dimensions of 46 x 28 x 24 cm in size with you in the cabin. Air France does recommend that you use a flexible bag for your own comfort during the flight.

All dogs must be over  10 weeks old to travel in the cabin  and only one per passenger. Dogs weighing between 17-165 lbs 8-75 kg can be transported in the cargo. if your dog exceeds this it must be transported by freight.

Travel By Ferry With Your Dog To France

If your traveling from the UK with your dog to France and want to use a ferry, the most popular one is Brittany Ferries they accept dogs on board and have Pet-Friendly cabins, this way you won’t be parted from your dog when traveling.

There will also be a fee of £79 for your dog to travel with you in the cabin. When boarding the ferry a check-in agent will require the following below…

  • Your booking reference
  • Your passports (including the pet passports)
  • That your dog has a microchip
  • That you have a dog muzzled

Once your both boarded your dog will need to be muzzled at all times until departure .

Travel With Dog In Car To France

When you travel with a dog in a car it’s always better if your dog doesn’t have a full stomach, so only provide small snacks a couple of hours before you start your journey. Make sure you take plenty of water with you.

Also don’t forget that dog seat cover this is something your be glad to have. Not only will it protect your car seats or boot from any unexpected accidents this will save you a lot of work cleaning your car at the end of your day.

Make sure you stop every now and then to let your dog relieve themselves if your dog is drinking a lot of water then it’s something your need to do, also look out for sign’s, like when your dog spin’s around in one spot or any suspicious smells then it’s a good chance your dog needs to do its business.

Banned Breeds Of Dog In France

When concerning dangerous Dogs in France in 1999 there were restrictions to the ownership of dangerous dogs and this was split into 2 categories.

The first category

Dogs without official pedigree, or are a look-alike of the following breeds below.

  • Staffordshire Terrier
  • American Pit-bull Terrier

The second category

Any pedigree dogs registered with the official studbook. 

  • American Staffordshire Terrier
  • Rottweiler (without pedigree)

dog in france

Pet Insurance For Your Dog

Always consider getting Pet insurance for your dog especially when traveling abroad, This can cover much of the expenses, In case of an injury or illness, Just to be on the safe side, you can never be too careful.

If you’re looking into taking out Pet Insurance for your dog , you can either go direct to any providers online or use a price comparison website to find the cheapest deal.

Pet travel insurance can cover several costs that may arise overseas like any vet fees in case of an injury or illness. Or if your pet is lost or stolen your insurer can also help towards any advertising or reward costs to help find your dog.

If your holiday is canceled or your trip is cut short because your dog has passed away or needs urgent treatment your insurance provider can cover you for this.

Safe Temperature For Your Dog

When you  travel with your dog to France  you need to consider what the climate is like, That it’s a safe temperature for your dog, For example, My dog was born and raised in the UK and has adjusted to the temperature here so he’s used to this climate.

But when traveling to another country where it can be hotter than anything your dog has experience, Then this can be quite uncomfortable for your dog and in some cases can be fatal if you’re not careful.

Always check the weather in the country you plan to visit, and these days it’s not a hard thing to do, You can simply download a weather app on your phone, and this way your know what the temperature and weather are like at all times in any country.

Dog-Friendly Beaches

Now there are all kinds of dog-friendly Beaches in France where you can take your dog for a walk, There’s one beach called the Le Touquet  that’s located in northern France just an hour from Calais.

All dogs are allowed to explore this beach without a lead. there are activities on offer here if you visiting with your family, like horse riding, or surfing, or hiking along the vast stretch of perfect sand while enjoying the view.

The beach itself is huge with miles of sand for your dog to roam across, There are walking routes along this beach with cafes and ice cream shops to get a bit to eat.

It’s a great place to put up your umbrella and deck chair and just enjoy a view while watching your four-legged friend also enjoying them selfs.

It’s also a place where if you have your family with you they can enjoy doing some yachting, with a team of qualified instructors and this is accessible to everyone from the age of 8, with combinations and helmets all provided.

It has always been hard to try and find a dog-friendly beach in France. and those that are dog friendly have strict rules when letting your dog walk on them.

Some beaches will even have the dog area fenced off from the rest of the beach, This is so your dog can’t run around off the lead, and with some beaches that require your dog to be muzzled.

  • 8 Best Dog friendly beach holidays

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Guide on taking dogs to France [Pet Passport Requirements 2023]

taking dogs to france pet passport

Taking dogs to France is pretty straightforward. Firstly, you need to ensure you have to correct documentation for a Pet Passport. Dogs, cats and ferrets are eligible for an EU Pet Passport which allows them to travel freely within the EU without enduring a stay in pet quarantine. This involves getting your dog microchipped and vaccinated against rabies, at minimum. Secondly, you will need to organise travel. Traveling in a car on either a ferry or on the Eurotunnel is the easier option, however it is also possible to fly with your pet to France. However, this is often more complicated as airlines have strict rules and requirements for taking pets on their planes. 

In this article, we will discuss in detail the process of taking a dog to France. Additionally, we will walk you through the process of obtaining a France pet passport and all the documents required.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • What is a France Pet Passport?
  • Visit to the vet
  • Traveling by car
  • Traveling by air
  • Microchipping
  • Rabies vaccination
  • Animal health certificate (AHC)
  • Rabies titer test / rabies blood test
  • How much does is cost to take a dog to France?

Which dog breeds are banned from entering France?

Taking dogs to France for commercial reasons

Taking other pet species to France

  • Guidelines for dog carriers

Can I take my puppy to France?

  • Can I take my dog in the plane cabin with me?
  • What if I lose my pet passport?
  • Can I take my dog on the Eurotunnel with me?
  • Bottom line

What is a France Passport?

A France pet passport, or EU Pet Passport is a compilation of documents that your dog will need in order to travel to France, or other EU countries. With an EU Pet Passport , dogs, cats and ferrets are able to travel throughout the EU without enduring a quarantine period. Dogs will require a microchip and rabies vaccination at minimum. You will need proof of both in order to obtain an EU Pet Passport. All documents must be issued by an official veterinarian within the EU. Essentially, a pet passport demonstrates that your pet is fit and healthy to travel, and won’t be a threat to other dogs in France.

The documents required to travel with dogs depends on which country you are travelling from, and which country you are travelling to. Each country has different rules and requirements to export and import pets. Requirements and restrictions also vary between pet species. We will discuss the requirements to take dogs to France in detail below.

What does an EU Pet Passport contain?

A France pet passport, or EU Pet Passport contains all the documents required to take dogs to France. It will basically prove that your pet is fit and healthy to travel.

A France pet passport or EU Pet Passport contains the following information:

  • Details of ownership (name, address, passport number, telephone, etc.)
  • Description of the animal (name, species, breed, date of birth, etc.)
  • Official veterinarian’s details
  • Microchip information
  • Rabies vaccination certificate
  • Rabies antibody titer test results
  • Parasite treatment records
  • Additional vaccination and treatment records
  • Pet photo (optional)

At minimum, your France pet passport will contain those listed 1-5. These are compulsory in order to take dogs to France, or travel within the EU. Those listed 6-9 are potential requirements that your pet may need if you are traveling outside the EU.

All records must signed and stamped by an official EU veterinarian with official stickers from the medication used.

What is the process taking dogs to France?

travelling dog to france

VISIT THE VET

You will need to visit the vet to obtain your dog’s France pet passport.

Before booking an appointment, it’s a good idea to call ahead to make sure that your chosen vet is authorised to issue EU Pet Passports . Not all of them are.

At your appointment, the accredited vet will administer your dog with a microchip and rabies vaccination, if your pet hasn’t already had them. They will also complete a basic health examination to ensure your dog is healthy enough to travel. Once the veterinarian is satisfied that your pet is ready for travel, they will review all the paperwork and complete your dog’s pet passport booklet.

You will need to bring the following with you to the vet appointment:

  • Your passport
  • Your local address
  • Microchip information (if your pet already has one) – date of implantation, chip number and issuing company information (this info is also on the Annex IV)
  • Pet’s rabies certificate or rabies titre test results no less than 21 days old (if your pet has one)
  • Annex IV form completed by your home vet and endorsed by your country’s official veterinary regulatory body (if you are from outside the EU)
  • Dog photo (optional but recommended) – the size should be 2 x 2 inches (5cm x 5cm). Although it’s not required, it is better to have one as you do not want to give any customs official a reason to deny your pet entry into a country.

If your dog hasn’t had a microchip fitted or hasn’t had a rabies vaccination before, don’t worry, your vet will complete these at the appointment.

travelling dog to france

ORGANISE TRAVEL

You will then need to figure out how you will take your dog to France. Depending on where you are traveling from, it may be easier to travel by car, however you can also travel by air. Traveling by air is far more complicated as airlines have very specific rules and regulations when it comes to traveling with pets. Some airlines may even prohibit certain pet species, and breeds from boarding their planes. However, depending on where you are traveling from, you may only have the option to take your dog to France via air travel.

Travelling to France in a car

You can drive your dog to France from the UK, either via the Eurotunnel, or by taking a ferry to France.

If you have the option of taking dogs to France in a car, i.e. if you are traveling from another EU country, or the UK, there are two main options:

  • Board a cross channel ferry; or
  • Pass through the Eurotunnel.

Whichever option you choose, be sure to let your travel company know that you will be bringing your pet with you. It is best to do this well in advance to ensure for a smooth journey.

When traveling across travel, dogs generally must stay in your car or in a pet travel carrier. Therefore, for the comfort of your dog it is best to choose the shorter ferry rides during warmer months.

If taking the Eurotunnel, it costs an extra £19 per pet, with most ferries also charging a similar price.

Travelling from UK to France by air

If you are not traveling from the UK, or you do not have a car, it is usually an easier option to fly. 

Taking dogs to France by air is more complicated than traveling by car. This is because airlines have strict rules, regulations and restrictions when it comes to traveling with pets. Many airlines will not allow pets to travel on their planes at all, however there are some that will. It’s important to check your chosen airline’s pet policies before booking any travel.

Traveling via air is far more expensive too, as you will need to pay extra to ship your pet. The price varies between airlines, and depending on the weight and size of your pet.

1. Before booking your flight, be sure to check out different airline’s policies to ensure that you are able to take your pet with you.

Some airlines may allow your pet to travel in the cabin with you, where others will require pets to travel in the cargo area of the plane. If you have a small dog or cat, then you may be able to take them in the cabin with you. However, if you have a large dog then he will need to fly in the cargo.

2. When booking your flight, inform the airline that you will be bringing your pet with you.

Do this as soon as you book your flight, as airlines often have limitations on how many pets they can ship at any given time.

3. You must enter via a specific entry point.

There are specific entry points in France that allow flying with a dog from outside the EU – Paris, Reunion (French Territories), Marseille, Nice, Lyon and Toulouse.

4 . If you are flying into a neighbouring country, and then coming to France by land, check customs procedures for animals for BOTH countries. 

Each country will have different entry requirements for dogs.

5. Be sure to get an appropriate travel carrier and get your pet used to spending time in it.

Different airlines have different size and weight restrictions when it comes to pet travel carriers. Be sure to check those of your chosen airline. If traveling in the cabin of the plane, the carrier must be small enough to fit underneath the seat in front of you.

To ensure that the journey is as stress-free as possible for your pet, ensure they are comfortable in their travel carrier. You can do this by taking your dog on short journeys in it’s travel carrier. Take your dog out to lunch with you in its carrier, or take it to your friends house for a coffee. This way the longer journey will not be so stressful.

6. Clearly label your pet carrier.

Ensure you have all the correct documents ready to show customs officials. It’s also important to label your dog’s pet carrier.

  • 13 Airlines That Allow Flying With Dogs In-Cabin [Prices & Policies]
  • 13 Airlines That Allow Flying With a Cat In-Cabin [Prices & Policies]

What are the requirements for taking a dog  to France ?

travelling dog to france

In order to get a France Pet Passport to take your dog to France, your dog requires the following:

REQUIREMENT 1: MICROCHIPPING

To obtain a France pet passport to take dogs to France, they must be microchipped.

A microchip is a electronic chip that holds a unique number traceable with a chip reader. It is place just under your pet’s skin in between its shoulder blades. The microchip is detectable by a scanner, and will show your contact details once scanned. 

We recommend that this is the first step in the process of obtaining a France pet passport to take dogs to France. This is because if your dog hasn’t been microchipped before they get their rabies vaccination, then the vaccination may not be valid. This would therefore mean your dog would have to get vaccinated again.

REQUIREMENT 2: RABIES VACCINATION

In order to get a France pet passport to take dogs to France, they must be up to date on their rabies vaccinations.

In order to take dogs to France, you must be able to prove that your dog has had their rabies vaccination.

The timing of your dog’s rabies vaccination is important, and will depend on where you are traveling from. If you are traveling from a rabies controlled country , your dog must be vaccinated no sooner than 21 days of entering France. However, if you are traveling from a high-risk rabies country , you must wait for a minimum of 30 days after the primary or booster vaccination before receiving a rabies titer test (see next requirement 3).

France accepts the 3 year rabies vaccination for dogs. However, it should only be applied as a booster and not as their initial vaccination. You can speak to your vet about this.

Rabies-controlled (listed Third) countries as classified by the European Union:

High-rabies (non-listed Third) countries as classified by the European Union:

travelling dog to france

It may be possible that you require the following:

REQUIREMENT 3: ANIMAL HEALTH CERTIFICATE (AHC)

If you are taking a dog to France from outside the EU, you will require an Animal Health Certificate.

You will need a health certificate if:

  • You are taking dogs to France from outside the EU, for non-commercial reasons; or
  • You are taking dogs to France for commercial reasons

Commercial reasons include taking dogs to France for resale or adoption, or if you are not traveling with your pet within 5 days.

An official veterinarian must complete an EU Health certificate for France, in English, or translated to English.

Your health certificate must be endorsed by your home country government agency responsible for the import and export of pets. For example, in the US you will need to have your health certificate endorsed by the USDA. In Canada, this will be the CFIA.

The AHC is to cover transport of up to 5 dogs and is valid for 4 months, as long as your dog’s rabies vaccinations are in date.

REQUIREMENT 4: RABIES TITER TEST

To obtain a France pet passport to take dogs to France from a high-risk rabies country , your dog must pass a rabies titer test (rabies blood test).

A rabies titer test is a blood test to see whether your dog’s rabies vaccination was successful.

  • Your veterinarian will need to take a blood sample at least 30 days after the rabies vaccination.
  • The sample will then be sent to an EU -approved blood testing laboratory .
  • The blood rest results must show that the vaccination was successful – i.e. your dog’s blood must contain at least 0.5 IU/ml of the rabies antibody.
  • You must then wait 3 months before your dog can enter France. If you do not wait 3 months, then your dog will be quarantined in France for the remainder of the time.

How much does it cost to take a dog to France?

The cost of a France Pet Passport is usually around £60-£100. The cost is broken down into the following costs:

  • Microchipping – £0-20
  • Rabies vaccination – £0-20+
  • Pet passport application – £60
  • Rabies blood test (only if traveling from high-risk country) – £60-120

Firstly, different countries and veterinary clinics will charge different amounts for a pet passport. If you want to save some money, check the prices of a few different veterinary clinics. Some veterinary clinics will also offer pet passport packages with discounted prices.

If your dog already has a microchip, and a recent rabies vaccination, you will pay less for your EU Pet Passport . This is because you will only be paying for the health check and the document endorsement.

Furthermore, if you are traveling from a high-risk rabies country then you will also need to pay for your dog to have a rabies titer test or rabies blood test. This can cost anywhere between £60 to £120, depending on where you have your dog tested.

For more information on the cost of an EU Pet Passport , check How much does an EU Pet Passport cost? .

For information on how to get free microchipping in the UK check  How to get Dog Microchipping for Free in the UK .

Mastiff and Boerbull breeds and their crosses are prohibited from being imported to France.

France prohibits the import of the following breeds without pedigree certification :

  • Staffordshire Terriers
  • American Staffordshire Terriers
  • Rottweilers

These breeds must be a registered pedigree and crossbreeds are not permitted.

Owners of class 2 dogs must conform to import regulations above. Owners must have insurance to protect against liability. Your dog must receive approval from the local town council, have a detention permit, have behavioural evaluations and be leashed and muzzled when in public.

Any dogs being transported to France for commercial reasons, such as adoption and re-sale, require the following:

  • Valid rabies vaccination;
  • Undergo a health examination and be accompanied by an Annex I Health Form;
  • Be accompanied by original paperwork, signed by a licensed vet; and
  • A successful rabies titer test result.

Dogs are only permitted to enter France from a high-rabies country  if they are accompanied by their owner or a legal representative of the owner.

DOCUMENT ENDORSEMENT

A licensed veterinarian must complete the English version of the commercial EU health certificate for France within 48 hours of entry. If your dog is traveling from the US or Canada, the veterinarian must be accredited by the USDA or CFIA respectively and the commercial EU health certificate must be endorsed by the local USDA or CFIA office unless the certificate is completed by a military Veterinary Corps Officer or GS-0701 series civilian government veterinarian employed by the military. If taking dogs to France from another country, then the forms must be endorsed by the government agency responsible for the import and export of animals.

Additional info for taking dogs to France

  • You can legally take a  maximum of 5 dogs  with you.
  • Dogs  younger than 15 weeks old cannot enter France.
  • When you take your dog for a walk, you should  carry bags to collect your dog’s excrement . Otherwise, you could face high fines.
  • In France there is a general obligation to use a dog belt or harness in cars . If you’re driving, find out beforehand how you should take your dog in the car.
  • In France, ticks and lice that can transmit dangerous diseases are widespread in many regions. It is therefore advisable to provide your pet with adequate protection against ticks, and make sure they’re vaccinated against certain Mediterranean diseases such as leishmaniasis .
  • Dogs are banned from many official beaches in France during the high season in summer.
  • Dogs are allowed in some hotels, but not in many. It often depends on the size and number of dogs.  In restaurants, dogs are usually not allowed . If it’s a small, quiet dog, some restaurants will let you through with it.
  • Dogs are  not allowed on public transport in many cases . On French trains, they are sometimes allowed to travel in a box in the luggage trolley. Dogs are not allowed in public buildings and administrative offices unless they’re guide dogs.

Dogs cats and ferrets are permitted to get EU Pet passports to allow them to travel to France from EU countries.

France does not have any travel restrictions on invertebrates, tropical fish, reptiles, amphibia, mammals such as rodents and rabbits. You will simply need a health certificate from your vet in many cases. However, there are some additional rules when it comes to taking birds to France.

You are permitted to bring up to 5 birds as long as you have no intention to sell, rehome or transfer ownership in any way. All birds traveling to France will require the following:

  • A health certificate;
  • Stay in a quarantine facility for 30 days prior to transport;
  • Avian influenza H5 vaccine at least 60 days before transport; and
  • Tests for H5N1 PCR with negative results.

Guidelines for Dog Carriers

If you are flying to France with a dog, it is important that you use a dog carrier that is approved by your airline. Different airlines have different pet carrier policies, which often vary between aircrafts and routes. Check that your pet carrier is approved for your chosen airline, aircraft and route. 

The rules and regulations have been set out by International Air Transport Association (IATA) ensure that dogs are comfortable when travelling. Thus, inside their travel carriers, dogs must be able to stand up, turn around and lie down in a natural position in their kennel (without touching any side or the top of the container).

The rules for pet carriers also vary depending on whether your dog will be flying in the cabin or cargo area of the plane.

If you are travelling in the cabin with your dog, then you will need to ensure that it fits under the seat in front of you. This is why only small dogs weighing under 7-8kg are permitted in the cabin.

Furthermore, airlines often require that your dog must be obedient to your commands and must behave appropriately in public. Thus, he mustn’t bark or growl at other passengers or staff. If your dog does not behave in an appropriate manner, some airlines may transfer him to the cargo hold at an additional cost, or refuse to transport him all together. Some airlines require a consent form to ensure your pet is flight-ready.

For a list of airlines that allow dogs to fly in the cabin with their owners, check  13 Airlines That Allow Flying With Dogs In-Cabin [Prices & Policies] .

Frequently Asked Questions [FAQs]

Yes, as long as your puppy or kitten is at least 4 months old. This is because France requires dogs to be vaccinated against rabies, which can only be administered to dogs over the age of 3 months. You must then wait 21 days after the vaccination, before entering France. Additionally, proof of age should be available. If you are traveling from a high-risk rabies country then you will need to allow an additional 3 months to prepare.

Can I take my dog in the Eurotunnel with me?

Yes, the Eurotunnel allows dogs, cats and ferrets to travel with their owners to France. You will need to organise travel beforehand, and pay a £19 fee.

What if I lose my Pet Passport?

If a passport is lost or stolen, it can be replaced as long as you have evidence of the animal’s vaccination record and blood test result (if applicable). Both records must also show your pet's microchip number. Details of the lost or stolen passport, including its serial number, country and date of issue (if known) should be recorded on the Pet Passport Control Sheet. We recommend that you scan photos of your pet passport in case you lose it.

Can I take my pet in the plane cabin with me?

It is a possibility yes. If you are the owner of a small dog, then you may be able to take them in the cabin with you. However, only some airlines will allow this.

Bottom Line

Obtaining a France pet passport to take dogs to France is pretty straightforward. Firstly, you will need to get them an EU Pet Passport . This involves getting your dog microchipped and vaccinated against rabies at the vet. If you are traveling from a country outside the EU or are taking dogs to France for commercial reasons, your dog will require an animal health certificate (AHC). You will need to obtain this within 10 days of entering France, and the certificate is valid for 4 months. If you are traveling from a high-risk for rabies country, your dog will also require a rabies titer test, or rabies blood test.

Taking dogs to France in a car is simpler than flying. This is because airlines have strict rules and regulations to follow when traveling with dogs. However, if you are planning on flying with pets to France, ensure you select an airline that will permit the transport of your pet, and plan your trip well in advance. You will also need to enter France through specific ports of entry.

Hope you have found this helpful. Happy travels!

  • How Much Does an EU Pet Passport Cost?
  • How to get an EU Pet Passport [GUIDE]
  • How Much Does a Dog Passport Cost in the UK?
  • How to take a Dog on The Eurotunnel [Guide, FAQ & Prices]
  • How to take a Cat on The Eurotunnel [Guide, FAQ & Prices]
  • How to take a Ferret on The Eurotunnel [Guide, FAQ & Prices]
  • What is The Pet Travel Scheme (PETS)? [GUIDE]

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Travel: coming to France with your pet

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One of the ways in which the French customs authorities help to protect national territory is by inspecting pets’ health and travel documents.

Rules for importing pets: general framework

Pets imported from non-EU countries  must be declared and presented to Customs for document and identity checks before they can be allowed into the territory of the European Union. Importing an undeclared animal can result in a fine and confiscation of the animal.

- Only the following animals accompanying a traveller are considered pets within the meaning of veterinary regularities and as such are tolerated under the conditions set out below:

  • Dogs (including guide dogs), cats, ferrets
  • Invertebrates (except bees and crustaceans)
  • Rodents and domestic rabbits
  • Ornamental fish
  • All species of birds (except chickens, turkeys, guinea fowl, ducks, geese, quails, pigeons, pheasants, partridges, as well as ratites (Ratitae)

All other animals are excluded and must therefore be presented for veterinary inspection at a border control post (BCP) on entering French territory.

- The customs authorities carry out their inspection in the context of a non-commercial movement involving no more than five specimens per person.

- The person accompanying the animal must be either the owner or an individual who assumes responsibility for it on the owner’s behalf .

- The animals must be accompagnied by a health certificate .

Where these conditions are not met, the veterinary authorities are responsible for inspecting the animals concerned at a border control post (BCP). A common health entry document (CHED) is issued on completion of the inspection and must be presented in support of the customs declaration.

Please note : not all border control posts (BCP) are authorized to control pets. You must, before boarding, find out about the competence of the PCF at the point of entry.

Please note: where travel is taking place in connection with exhibitions, competitions or sporting events, the maximum number of domestic carnivores (dogs, cats, ferrets) may exceed five if the animals are more than six months old and written proof of their registration to compete or take part in such events can be presented.

Specific conditions and restrictions apply to protected species, especially certain birds and reptiles, under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

Health formalities for importing dogs, cats or ferrets

You intend to bring a dog, cat or ferret to the UE (five animals at most).

A European regulation regulates movements of domestic carnivores (dogs, cats and ferrets) in order to limit the risk of introducing animal diseases, especially rabies.

When you arrive on EU territory you must be able to prove that your animal fulfils all the cumulative health requirements imposed by Regulation (EU) 576/2013 of 12 June 2013 . The customs authorities will verify that all these cumulative health requirements are met.

If you wish to bring a dog, cat or ferret from a non-european country, please make sure you comply with the following recommendations:

  • Your animal must be identified by an electronic transponder . Animals identified by a tattoo before 3 July 2011 may continue to travel provided that the tattoo is clearly legible. Transport companies and the customs in the EU can read microchips that meet International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards ISO 11784 and ISO 11785.You may have to bring your own microchip reader when you travel if your pet’s microchip does not meet these standards.
  • You must get your pet microchipped before, or at the same time as, their rabies vaccination . The anti-rabies vaccination must be valid at the time of travel in compliance with the provisions of Annex III of Regulation (EU) 576/2013. If the animal is being vaccinated against rabies for the first time or if the previous vaccination has not been kept valid, a period of at least 21 days must have elapsed after completion of the vaccination protocol required by the manufacturer;
  • at least three months before travelling, you should ask for a rabies antibody titration test (laboratory test of a blood sample to ensure that the anti-rabies vaccination is effective) to be performed at an EU-authorised laboratory ( there is a list of rabies testing authorised laboratories on the Europa website ).

The result of the titration test, which must be higher than or equal to 0.5 UI/litre, will be valid for the animal’s entire lifetime, provided that the anti-rabies vaccination is kept permanently valid (booster shots administered within the stipulated time limit).

Domestic carnivores from the following territories and non european countries ( listed in Annex II, Parts 1 and 2 of Regulation (EU) 577/2013 of 28 June 2013 ) are exempt from the antibody titration test for importation into the European Union:

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba, Ascension Island, Australia, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Bermuda, BES Islands (Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba), Bosnia-Herzegovina, British Virgin Islands, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, Curaçao, Falkland Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, Gibraltar, Great Britain, Guernesey, Hong Kong, Ile de Man, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Liechtenstein, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Montserrat, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Russia, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Pierre et Miquelon, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Singapore, Sint Maarten, Taiwan, Trinidad and Tobago, United Arab Emirates, United States of America (including Guam, American Samoa, Northern Marian Islands, Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands), Vanuatu, Wallis and Futuna.

Dogs, cats and ferrets accompanying their owner from Andorra, Croatia, Faroe Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland or Vatican City State are subject to the same health requirements as dogs, cats and ferrets travelling from a EU Member state.

Do not forget to ask an official veterinarian of the country of origin to draw up a health certificate in compliance with the model shown in Annex IV, Part 1 of Regulation 577/2013 of 28 June 2013 as amended. The certificate contains the information mentioned above (identification, anti-rabies vaccination and antibody titration test where applicable).

The animal’s EU passport can replace the health certificate, when coming back to the EU.

You will have to present this health certificate together with the documents relating to vaccination and the antibody test to the customs authorities carrying out the inspection.

For health and safety reasons, bringing domestic carnivores less than 16 weeks old, even vaccinated for rabies, into France is strictly prohibited.

Important reminder

There is a ban on importing certain attack dogs into France. The dogs concerned are Category 1 dogs without a pedigree recognised by the French Ministry of Agriculture belonging to the following breeds: Staffordshire terrier, American Staffordshire terrier (pitbull), Mastiff (boerbull) and Tosa.

If you wish to bring a Category 2 dog of the Staffordshire terrier, American Staffordshire terrier or Tosa breed into France, you must produce a certificate of birth or pedigree issued by the central canine society of the dog’s country of origin in order to prove a pedigree recognised by the International Canine Federation to the customs authorities.

However, rules on the movement and ownership of Category 2 dogs apply.

Please also note that on French territory, Category 2 dogs must be muzzled and kept on a leash on public thoroughfares, in public places and on public transport.

Health requirements for importing other pets

Birds (except chickens, turkeys, guinea fowl, ducks, geese, quails, pigeons, pheasants, partridges, as well as ratites (ratitae)).

Because of outbreaks of bird flu in a number of third countries, there are strict rules for importing pet birds into the European Union.

Pursuant to Commission delegated Regulation (EU) 2021/1933 , travellers wishing to import five specimens at most must present the customs authorities with a health certificate issued by an official veterinarian and a declaration by the owner or his/her representative (models provided for in the annex to Commission implementing Regulation (EU) 2021/1938 - part 1 and 2).

The health certificate states that one of the following additional conditions must be met:

  • isolation 30 days before the date of their dispatch , under official supervision at the place of departure in a country mentioned in the first column of the table appearing in part 1 of Annex V, Annex XIV or Annex XIX of Implementing Regulation (EU) 2021/404
  • primary vaccination and at least one booster against the H5 and H7 avian influenza virus during the last 6 months and at least 60 days before importation. The vaccine(s) used must have been approved for the species concerned, in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions; the vaccine must not be a live attenuated vaccine and must have been administered by a qualified veterinarian or an official veterinarian of the third country of dispatch)
  • PCR screening for the H5 and H7 avian influenza virus with negative result on a sample taken at the earliest on the 7th day of isolation and isolation of the animal, under the supervision of an authorized veterinarian or an official veterinarian, before the importation at least 14 days (a serological test is not sufficient).

Finally, the birds must be transferred, by their owner or the authorized person, directly from the point of entry of the travelers to a private household or to another residence inside the EU . There, the birds must be kept under official surveillance for 30 days after entering the EU. During this period, birds should not be brought into a place where birds gather (performance venues, fairs, exhibitions).

N.B.: pet birds accompanying their owner from Andorra, Croatia, Faroe Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland or Vatican City State are  subject to the same health requirements as pet birds travelling from a EU Member state.

In all events, you are strongly advised to consult a veterinarian a few months before travelling in order to carry out these formalities.

Rodents, lagomorphs (rabbits), reptiles, amphibians and ornamental fish

In order to be importable into French territory (up to a maximum of five specimens per person), pet ornamental tropical fish, rodents, lagomorphs, reptiles and amphibians must be accompanied by a supporting document compliant with the model provided in Annex 27 of the Order of 19 July 2002, signed by a practising veterinarian (veterinarian authorised to practice veterinary medicine).

Specific conditions exist for the introduction of such animals into the other EU Member States. Please contact those countries’ embassy in the third country of residence.

For more information

  • (fr) Ministry of Agriculture website

New London Branch Now Open

PassPets Low Cost Animal Health Certificates

[email protected]

Havant: 023 9245 3650

London: 020 8137 8970

  • Dr Gemma Nash

Taking a dog to France and back in 2024: Exactly what you need to know

Travelling to France and back with a Dog

Taking your dog to France from the UK is a little more complex than it was before Brexit, however it's still pretty simple. In this guide we run through the 6 steps to take your dog from the UK to France and back again, including which documents, vaccinations and treatments are required, and when you'll need to get these done.

This guide is frequently updated by our vets to ensure our advice is up to date. If you think something is incorrect or out of date, please contact us so we can update it.

Six Point Checklist for Taking a Dog from the UK to France and Back Again

Book your dog in for a rabies vaccination at your vet practice

Research travel options and book your crossing to France

Obtain an Animal Health Certificate within 10 days of your departure date

Travel to France with your dog

Visit a vet in France to get tapeworm treatment administered between 1 and 5 days before returning to the UK

Return to the UK

1. Book your dog in for a rabies vaccination at your vet practice

All dogs that travel to the EU from the UK are required to have an Animal Health Certificate, and the key requirements for an Animal Health Certificate is that your dog must be microchipped and vaccinated against rabies.

Your dog will need to have their rabies vaccination at least 21 days before an Animal Health Certificate can be issued, so it's worth booking your dog in for a rabies vaccination at your vets as early as possible to avoid delays to your travel. Most rabies vaccinations administered in the UK are valid for three years, so there is no downside to getting the rabies vaccination booked in well before your travel date.

Prices for a rabies vaccination vary by veterinary practice, but they typically range from £50-90.

At the rabies vaccination appointment, the vet should give you a document evidencing the vaccination details, such as a vaccination card or vaccination certificate.

You'll need to ensure that this document contains the following information in order to get an Animal Health Certificate:

Pet details including 15 digit microchip number

Date of rabies vaccination

Batch number and manufacturer of rabies vaccination

Practice stamp and signature of vet who administered the rabies vaccination

France does not require that your dog is up to date with the annual, routine vaccinations but it's advisable to keep these up to date anyway.

2. Research travel options and book your crossing to France

There are a number of different ways to travel to France with a dog.

Travelling from the UK to France by air is very complicated, so most people tend to travel by car, either through the Eurotunnel or by ferry. When travelling with a dog you will need to enter France through a designated travellers' point of entry (TPE) .

The most popular routes are listed below:

Eurotunnel from Folkestone to Calais

Ferry from Portsmouth to Le Havre

Ferry from Portsmouth to Caen

Ferry from Portsmouth to Cherbourg

Ferry from Portsmouth to St. Malo

Ferry from Newhaven to Dieppe

Ferry from Poole to Cherbourg

Ferry from Plymouth to Roscoff

Ferry from Dover to Calais

Ferry from Dover to Dunkirk

You'll need to have an idea on which date you are planning on travelling to France before you book in for an Animal Health Certificate appointment, because the AHC needs to be issued within 10 days of your travel date and at least 21 days after the date the rabies vaccination was given.

If your pet is going to be travelling with a friend/family member or with a pet transport company, you (the owner) must be travelling within 5 days of your dog's departure date. If you are travelling more than 5 days outside your dog's departure date, an Export Health Certificate would be required instead.

3. Obtain an Animal Health Certificate within 10 days of your departure date

You will need to book in for an Animal Health Certificate (AHC) appointment with an Official Veterinarian (a vet that has done the extra course required to issue pet travel documents).

This appointment needs to be within 10 days of your travel date, and at least 21 days after your dog's rabies vaccination date. There is no way around the 21 day wait period following an initial rabies vaccination, so it's vital that you get the rabies vaccination booked in as soon as you have decided you want to take your dog to France.

Different vet practices have different protocols and prices when it comes to issuing Animal Health Certificates. Prices typically range from £100-£300 per pet. The Official Veterinarian vet that issues the Animal Health Certificate must physically scan your dog's microchip so Animal Health Certificates cannot be issued remotely.

See our page on Animal Health Certificate FAQs for more information.

At PassPets , we've issued thousands of AHCs for pet owners around the country, and with prices starting from £99, we're guaranteed to be cheaper than your vets. Click here for more information about our service or call us to speak to one of our veterinary team.

travelling dog to france

4. Travel to France with your dog

Once you have the Animal Health Certificate in your hand, you can travel to France with your dog. You need to have departed on your trip no more than 10 days after the AHC was issued, otherwise you will need a new one.

Different ports have different procedures for checking pets in (they will inform you upon booking with them), but generally you'll need to take your dog to their pet reception where you'll need scan your dog's microchip and they will check through the Animal Health Certificate to ensure all the information is correct.

The Animal Health Certificate is valid for ongoing travel within the EU (including Switzerland and Norway) for a period of 4 months from the date it is issued or until your dog's rabies vaccination expires, whichever date is earlier. However, if you leave the EU (for example to come back to the UK), you will need another AHC in order to re-enter the EU.

5. Visit a vet in France to get tapeworm treatment administered between 1 and 5 days before returning to the UK

All dogs entering the UK need to have tapeworm treatment administered by a vet no less than 24 hours (1 day) and no more than 120 hours (5 days) before the dog's scheduled arrival time in the UK.

The treatment date and time must be recorded by the vet at the bottom of page 4 of the Animal Health Certificate. Most vets in France are familiar with having to do this, as it's been a requirement for many years, so you shouldn't have any trouble finding a vet to get this done.

This is an example of how the tapeworm treatment table at the bottom of page 4 needs to be completed:

travelling dog to france

If you are travelling to France and returning to the UK within 5 days, the tapeworm treatment can be administered by a vet in the UK before your outbound journey to France.

If the tapeworm treatment is not administered in time or if it has been incorrectly recorded on the AHC, it will result in your dog being refused travel, and you'll need to get this done again.

See here for more detailed information on the tapeworm treatment requirements for returning to the UK.

6. Return to the UK

On your return to the UK, you'll be asked to show the Animal Health Certificate (with the tapeworm treatment details added to it) at the border. If the tapeworm treatment has not been given in the correct time period (1 to 5 days before arriving in the UK), then you will either have to wait until 24 hours have passed, or you'll need to take the dog to a vet to get the tapeworm treatment administered again.

How do I get an Animal Health Certificate through PassPets?

Book an appointment at one of our clinics for within 10 days of your travel date, and we'll email you our online pre-appointment form to complete so one of our vets can prepare your certificate. Then just come to your appointment with your dog and rabies evidence, and we'll issue the AHC there and then.

____________________

Other things to be aware of

Dog food & treats - no meat based products allowed.

Now that the UK has left the EU, officially you are not allowed to bring meat or dairy-based dog food (including treats) with you unless your vet has given you written confirmation that your dog requires a certain dog food for medical reasons (and even then the limit is only 2kg).

So for your journey, you'll either want to consider feeding your dog at the port prior to arrival, or purchasing vegan dog food for the journey until you arrive in France and can buy some regular dog food. It's worth doing research before you go to work out where you can purchase your dog's regular food from in France.

On your return journey, there are no restrictions on bringing dog food from France to the UK.

Read the full rules from the EU here .

Some ferry companies require that all dogs brought on board and are not staying in the car wear a muzzle at all times, and some ports require that dogs wear a muzzle if they leave the car to walk around the port, so it's worth checking with the ferry company and port before you go to see what their rules are.

Pet Travel Insurance

Many pet insurance policies cover short trips abroad, but it's worth checking before you go to ensure your pet is covered.

Dogs travelling in a car

It's important to ensure your dog is safe when transporting them in your car.

When travelling with your dog in your car you should:

Always take plenty of water, ideally in a non-spill bowl

Feed your dog no sooner than two hours before you travel - your dog will travel better if they do not have a full stomach.

Take regular breaks

Ensure your dog is secure and comfortable, and has a familiar toy and blanket with them

Consider using calming tablets or calming spray

Never leave your dog in the car on a warm day

If you have any questions about taking your dog to France or anywhere else in the world, please don't hesitate to contact us. One of our team will be happy to help.

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Wet Nose Escapades

the Traveling Yorkie, Roger Wellington

Taking Your Dog to France – What You MUST Know

September 10, 2023

WOOF, are you planning to travel to France with your dog? Before you book that international flight or cross-country train, check out my dog-friendly guide to France now! Find out what you MUST know before taking your dog to France.

Bonjour! I can’t bark about international dog travel without barking about France. If you don’t already know, France is a dog-friendly country where many dogs live ultra-pampered lives. Since my first international flight was from Los Angeles to Paris, France holds a special place in my little BIG Yorkie heart. After all, setting my tiny furry paws on Charles de Gaulle marked the beginning of my new chapter as a furry global nomad and expat. Now, my stylish tail is wagging to show you the ropes on how to take your dog to France. 

Yorkie dog at a Parisian cafe

Dog Import Requirements from the U.S. & Canada

*ISO-compliant 15-digit Microchip – The rabies vaccination must be administered AFTER your dog is microchipped, NOT before. The good news is that the vaccination can be given on the same day as the microchip. 

*Rabies vaccination (or proof of vaccination) – Vaccination must be administered at least 21 days before entry, and your dog must be at least 12 weeks old.

If your dog was previously vaccinated for rabies but not microchipped, then the rabies vaccination must be administered AGAIN after being microchipped. This was my case, unfortunately. GRRR. 🙁

*E.U. Health Certificate (non-commercial) – Print out the health certificate and bring it to the veterinarian to fill out. Make sure it’s non-commercial transport, not commercial. Put your furry paws on the U.S. or Canada forms.

*Don’t forget to get a routine check-up or examination for your dog at the veterinarian  to make sure he or she is well enough to fly.

Once your veterinarian completes the E.U. Health Certificate , you have to get the paperwork endorsed by your local APHIS Veterinary Services Office (U.S.) for $38 or Canadian Food Inspection Agency (Canada) for $20. Upon endorsement by the USDA (U.S.) or CFIA Accredited (Canada) Veterinarian, your dog must arrive in France or the E.U. within 10 days from the date. Be sure to present your dog’s rabies certificate, copy of flight reservation, and the E.U. Health Certificate to the office. Do NOT skip this step!

Once stamped, the E.U. Health Certificate doesn’t expire until 4 months from the date OR until the rabies vaccination expires, whichever is first. WOOF-HOO! 

However, if you plan on visiting France or the E.U. with your dog more than once, then it’s a pawsome idea to swap the E.U. Health Certificate for an E.U. Pet Passport , which is required for travel between E.U. countries for animals. Upon arrival in France, take your dog to a veterinarian who has the authority to issue pet passports (call to make sure before scheduling an appointment. With an expiration date of 10 years (or as long as you keep up with the rabies vaccination, the Pet Passport is the KEY to dog travel in Europe. No more vet health certificates or APHIS endorsements!

Wanna get an idea of how much I paid? Put your furry paw HERE!

Dog Import Requirements from the U.K.

With Brexit in effect, dogs entering the U.K. for the very first time must have an animal health certificate rather than a pet passport issued in Great Britain. If you have a pet passport issued in an E.U. country, then, of course, it is still valid for travel. This new requirement is effective January 2021 . The process is similar to dogs coming from the U.S. and Canada.

Yorkie dog at the louvre in Paris

* Animal Health Certificate (non-commercial) – You must find an “official veterinarian” in the U.K. who can issue and sign the certificate. Upon endorsement, the paperwork is valid for 4 months (or until the rabies vaccination expires, whichever comes first). This certificate must be completed within 10 days of departure date.

*Don’t forget to get a routine check-up or examination for your dog at the veterinarian to make sure he or she is well enough to fly.

Dog Import Requirements from another E.U. country

For E.U. travelers , all you need is an E.U. Pet Passport, and you’re all set on taking your dog to France!

E.U. Pet Passport Requirements:

Where can you take your dog in France?

As a dog travel blogger, I can attest that no one can bark international dog travel without referencing the dog-loving culture in France. With more than half of the French population with a dog, the country has one of the highest ratios of dogs per person in the world. Now, that’s a pawty ! A quick stroll in the ARF -so-charming Le Marais in Paris will allow you to stumble upon a dog or two hanging out at a Parisian café alongside their humans. From boulangeries to Metro, the French just love taking their dogs everywhere, especially for urbanites. This is what makes taking your dog to France so much FUN.

Food & Drink Places – Unlike the U.S. and Canada, France does NOT have strict health regulations that bar dogs from entering establishments that sell food and drinks. WOOF, this means dogs (whether big or small) can hang out with humans at most (if not, all) restaurants, cafes, and bars in France. Most restaurants, regardless of how fancy they are, welcome dogs to dine indoors. And, the waiter will even bring out a dog bowl without your request. Whether you want to grab a baguette on the go or chomp on beef bourguignon at the local bistro, you’re welcome to take a furry date along. With that barked , there may be a few individually-owned ethnic restaurants that disallow dogs – be on the lookout for signs or ask when in doubt. 

Try my 10 favorite places to eat in Paris!

Yorkie dog in dog friendly cafe Le Marais, Paris

Watch me find the best food in Paris:

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel: Wet Nose Escapades by Roger Wellington for fun dog travel videos! Sniff out my step-by-step guide to traveling to Paris with your dog .

Markets & Grocery Stores – Dogs are NOT allowed inside markets and grocery stores, BUT some places will allow your dog (informally, off the record) if you’re making a quick stop OR if you shop with your dog inside a carrier or travel bag. Nonetheless, it’s best to leave your dog at home when you’re out getting groceries. BUT, the good news is that dogs are welcome to walk through open-air markets, including local farmers markets.

Yorkie dog shopping in Paris

Pharmacies – YES, dogs are often seen in lines at pharmacies with their humans. However, like in the U.S. and Canada, they are NOT allowed inside hospitals and medical offices. 

Public Transportation – Public transportation in France is dog-friendly! In Paris , dogs can ride Metro/RER and buses! Small dogs can even ride FOR FREE or discounted rate on all types of public transportation – given that they’re carried inside a travel bag. My humans paid 7€ for my train ticket from Paris to Lyon a few years ago. It’s also common to see small dogs sitting on their human’s lap or standing next to their human.

WOOF, dogs are allowed on SNCF’s TGV, Intercités, and TER trains (France’s National Railway). The limit is TWO dogs or animals per passenger, which is a refresher from the commonly found one pet per passenger policy throughout Europe. Dogs are allowed on all trains in France except Eurostar, which is notorious for prohibiting dogs onboard. Small domestic animals traveling in a closed bag or basket, muzzled dogs, and guide dogs for the blind are ALL welcome on board – well, provided that your fellow passengers do not object.

The catch is that you do have to pay a ticket for your dog depending on the weight. If your dog weighs less than 6 kg and travels in a bag or basket no larger than 45X30X25 cm, then the fare is only €7. Your dog and carrier must also be placed on your knees or at your feet. However, tickets for small dogs inside a carrier are rarely checked. Regardless, I usually show my ticket to the train staff to be on the safe side. I’m not sure if there’s more of an honor system for small dogs or if it’s solely due to the fact that a carrier can pass as baggage.

For dogs larger than 6 kg, you must pay 50% of the original fare as calculated using the standard rate per kilometer. Per their policy, you must also muzzle them throughout the entire ride and keep them by your feet (although rarely enforced). Guide dogs are always exempt from the muzzle and fare. You should also travel with your dog’s paperwork and health documents and ensure good behavior.

Shops & Boutiques – Whether it’s a big retailer or small boutique, most stores that don’t sell food will permit dogs on-premise. Since it is up to the store owner’s discretion, be sure to check for signs that indicate otherwise.

Hair & Nail Salons – While I don’t recommend exposing your dog to the harmful chemicals found in salons, you can generally take your dog into both hair and nail salons should you ever find the need. 

Taxis – “G7” Taxi is a taxi booking app with a pet-friendly option, which comes in handy when traveling locally with your dog. As for “normal” or non-G7 taxis, it could be challenging to find one that accepts dogs. Like Uber and other rideshares, it’s solely up to the discretion of the driver.

Parks – GRRRR, many parks in France sadly ban dogs! This may come as a surprise to dog lovers that public parks in France aren’t as dog-friendly as you’d imagine. For the longest time, dogs were banned from Paris’ perfectly architected parks with beautiful gardens. Thankfully, as of January 2019, dogs are allowed to meander in many of Paris’ finest parks given that they are leashed, kept on paths, and stay away from children’s playgrounds. Regardless, you may still see dogs at parks and grounds where they’re technically banned as some locals are willing to risk a potential fine.  

Yorkie dog at the park in Paris

Churches – Dogs are not allowed inside places of worship, except for legitimately certified assistance dogs. 

Museums/Tourist Attractions – Unless you have a legitimately certified service dog, you cannot bring your dog inside museums or indoor attractions. BUT, the good news is that you can still explore the exterior grounds and snap a few Instagrammable photos with your dog. 

Click here to find out if you can take your dog to the Louvre!

Hotels/Accommodations – Dog-friendly hotels and stays are super easy to find! ARF, often without extra charge! Some places may charge an extra 5 to 10 euros per day (or more for luxurious establishments) while others will allow your dog to stay completely FREE.

Dog Homelessness in France

Yorkie dog in Lyon, France Place Bellecour

Despite France’s dog-loving society, dog homelessness is still prevalent country-wide. Just like in any other first-world nation, an exorbitant number of dogs (and cats) still enter shelters or are dumped every year. Sadly, between 100,000 and 200,000 pets are abandoned each year – with 60% of the occurrence happening over the summer due to the challenge of traveling with animals. 

Picking up after your dog in France

OK, so the French are notorious for not picking up after their dogs, BUT that doesn’t mean you should follow suit. Regardless of the norm, you should always be a respectful visitor by cleaning up after your dog. From my extended stays over the years, I can attest that the poop situation has continued to improve, particularly in urban areas. This could be due to a more environmentally-conscious younger generation and/or the rise of hefty fines for un-scooped poop (although enforcement can be a hit or miss). Nevertheless, you still need to watch where you’re going – don’t glue your eyes to your phone while walking your dog! 

Veterinarians in France

ARF, you’re in luck! French veterinary care is not only way cheaper than the U.S. and U.K., but also offers the same level of quality care. From standard examinations to lifesaving surgeries to sought-after E.U. pet passports, you won’t break the bank if you need to take your dog to the veterinarian during your stay. From my experience, I’ve found that the veterinarians here spend more time during visits and charge only about half the price (or even less) compared to my veterinarians back home in California and New York. 

ARF, I hope you enjoy taking your dog to France! Be sure to share your dog-friendly French experience with me. 🙂 BARK AT ME!

Sniff out more posts on dog-friendly France HERE.

Markin’ it up,

Roger Wellington a.k.a. The Doob

Traveling Yorkie, Wet Nose Escapades

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The Good Life France

Everything You Want to Know About France and More...

Guide to taking your dog to France

  • Guest writer
  • Pets And Animals

Small dog in front of the Louvre Museum, Paris

For dog parents who love to travel, France is a dream come true. And it’s no secret that France is an ultra dog-friendly country.If you’re planning to travel to France with your dog, these great tips from dog travel website, Wetnose Escapades, will help you:

Dog Import Requirements from the U.S. & Canada

For travelers coming from the U.S. and Canada, you’ll need to take your dog to an accredited veterinarian for the following:

* ISO-compliant 15-digit Microchip – Keep in mind that the rabies vaccination must be administered AFTER your dog is microchipped, NOT before. However, the vaccination can be administered on the same day as the microchip.

* Rabies vaccination (or proof of vaccination if your dog already has one) – Vaccination must be done at least 21 days before entry and your dog must be at least 12 weeks old.

Please note that if your dog was previously vaccinated for rabies but not microchipped, then he or she must be given the rabies vaccination again AFTER being microchipped.

*EU Health Certificate (non-commercial) – Be sure to print out the certificate and bring it to the veterinarian for completion. Get the forms for the U.S. or Canada .

*Besides acquiring the required paperwork for dog travel, it’s imperative that your dog gets a thorough examination from the veterinarian to ensure that he or she is healthy enough to fly.

Upon obtaining the completed EU Health Certificate from the veterinarian, you must then get the paperwork endorsed by your local APHIS Veterinary Services Office www.aphis.usda.gov (U.S.) or Canadian Food Inspection Agency (Canada). Your dog must arrive in France or the EU within 10 days from the date that the USDA Accredited (U.S.) or CFIA Accredited (Canada) Veterinarian endorses the health certificate. This step is very important!

Remember to bring the rabies certificate, copy of flight reservation, and the EU Health Certificate that requires endorsement.

Once it’s stamped, the EU Health Certificate is valid for travel within the EU for up to 4 months (or until the rabies vaccination expires, whichever comes first).

*Please note that the entire process also applies to assistance dogs.

OPTIONAL: If you plan on traveling frequently to France or EU with your dog, then you should take your dog to an accredited veterinarian upon arrival to Europe to exchange your existing EU Health Certificate for an EU Pet Passport . The passport is valid for 10 years.

**A European pet passport is required for travel between EU countries for animals. It contains a description of your pet, ownership contact, microchip information, vaccination records, and the issuing veterinarian’s contact. You can obtain a European pet passport for your dog from any authorized vet once you’re in the EU.

Dog Import Requirements from the UK

Starting January 2021 to reflect Brexit, the only new requirement for travel to the EU for first-time travelers is the use of an animal health certificate , rather than a pet passport issued in Great Britain. You can still use a pet passport that was issued in an EU country.

You’ll need to take your dog to an accredited veterinarian for the following:

You will need the ISO-compliant 15-digit Microchip and Rabies vaccination per US and Canada travellers.

*Animal Health Certificate (non-commercial) – Find an “official veterinarian” who can issue the certificate no more than 10 days before travel. The certificate must be signed by an “official veterinarian.” Upon endorsement, the paperwork is valid for 4 months (or until the rabies vaccination expires, whichever comes first).

Please note that the entire process also applies to assistance dogs.

OPTIONAL: If you plan on traveling frequently to France or EU with your dog, then you should take your dog to an accredited veterinarian upon arrival to Europe to exchange your existing EU Health Certificate for an EU Pet Passport. The Pet Passport especially comes in handy if you plan on returning to the EU with your dog in the future. The passport is valid for years on end – mine expires a whoppin’ 10 years from the date of issuance and I’ve read that the passport doesn’t expire as long as you keep up with the rabies vaccination. With an EU Pet Passport, you can kiss all the onerous paperwork goodbye!

Dog Import Requirements from another EU country

EU rules make it super easy to travel to another EU country with your dog with an EU Pet Passport.

For travelers from other countries in the European Union, you will need to take your dog to an accredited veterinarian who can issue an EU Pet Passport. You will need the You will need the ISO-compliant 15-digit Microchip and Rabies vaccination per UK, US and Canada travellers.

France dog culture

It’s no secret that the French love dogs. France has one of the highest ratios of dogs per person in the world. Several French cities have notable historic pet cemeteries, illustrating the French’s long history of animal companionship. The French just love taking their dogs everywhere. This is especially true for city dwellers who live in small apartments. Here’s a quick overview of where you can and cannot take your dog in France:

Eating & drinking places . Dogs are free to wine and dine with humans at many restaurants in France. Even the most upscale dining places may be dog-friendly with servers happily bringing a dog bowl to your table. Whether indoor or outdoor, dogs are welcome inside many drinking and dining establishments, Cafés, boulangeries, patisseries, brasseries, bouchons, bistros, restaurants, crêperies, and bars often allow dogs. Just ask if in doubt.

Markets & grocery stores. Although dogs are technically not allowed, some establishments may look the other way if you’re in and out quickly or if you put your small dog inside a bag.

Pharmacies . Since it’s the norm for the French to run errands with their dogs, it’s not uncommon to see a dog inside a pharmacy. Dogs are not allowed inside hospitals and medical offices.

Shops & boutiques. Whether it’s a big retailer or small boutique, some stores that don’t sell food will permit dogs on-premise. Since it is largely up to the store owner’s discretion, be sure to check for signs that indicate otherwise.

Public transportation . Dogs are welcome on public transportation in Paris, including Metro/RER trains and buses. Small dogs transported via carriers or bags can travel on all modes of public transportation, either for free or at a discounted rate. As for larger dogs who can’t fit inside a bag, they must have a ticket of their own (at a discounted price, e.g. a child’s fare). They must also be muzzled and leashed – well, at least in theory (it’s not always the case in practice).

In certain cities, dogs may only be allowed onboard if they fit inside a small bag or basket, which poses a problem if you’re traveling with larger dogs.

Taxis. Research a taxi app which welcomes pets. It could be challenging to find one that accepts dogs. It’s solely up to the discretion of the driver.

Parks. Many parks are off-limits for dogs. If allowed, dogs must be leashed, kept on paths, and stay away from children’s playgrounds.

Museums/tourist attractions . Dogs are not allowed inside museums or indoor tourist attractions, with the exception of certified assistance dogs.

Hotels/accommodation. Dog-friendly accommodation is plentiful. Some places may charge extra while others will welcome your furry traveler to stay for free.

The Poop Situation

You are required to pick up after your dog. Admittedly not everyone in France does, we all know the stories of pavement poop in Paris but it has definitely got better and there are hefty fines if you don’t scoop your dog’s poop.

Veterinarians

French veterinary care is generally cheaper than the U.S. and U.K.

Recommended Dog-Friendly Cities in France

Are you ready to explore France with your dog? Here are some of my favorite dog-friendly cities!

Paris. In Paris , you will find plenty of Parisian dogs alongside their humans shopping on the fashionable Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré or enjoying a long, leisure outing at Parisian cafés in Saint Germain or Le Marais. From canine chauffeur service to doggy boutique shops, the dog-friendly culture can be experienced almost everywhere. Even though dogs aren’t allowed inside any of Paris’ world-famous attractions (that’s right, even the Eiffel Tower is off-limits to dogs except for certified assistance dogs), your dog can explore the exterior grounds of these magnificent landmarks. Dogs can sniff out the stunning dog-friendly grounds of the Louvre Palace, the massive Luxembourg Gardens, and the enchanting Palais-Royal Garden among many other dog-friendly spots.

Lyon. The third largest city in France, Lyon is the gastronomic capital of France with a rich Roman past. Besides wining and dining with your dog, you can walk around the gigantic Place Bellecour and visit the Ancient Theatre of Fourvière. My favorite dog-friendly parks are the 8-hectare Parc des Hautefeuilles (with a special dog area), the ginormous 117-hectares Parc de la Tête d’Or (with two separate dog runs), and the 18-hectare Parc de Gerland (on-leash dogs are welcome). Be sure to take your dog to The Smoking Dog, which is a cool dog-friendly pub located in Old Lyon.

Marseille. A dynamic city in southern France, Marseille is known for its old port, alluring beaches, and sunny weather. In Le Panier, you can enjoy a bowl of tasty bouillabaisse, Marseille’s famous fish soup, with your dog by your side either indoor or outdoor. From the Old Port, you can make the hilly trek to Notre Dame de la Garde with your dog for some amazing panoramic views of the city. Or you can choose from a variety of dog-friendly trails along the Mediterranean Sea in Parc National des Calanques. For dogs who love a good swim, they can get their paws wet and their noses sandy on the beaches of Plage de Saint-Estève and Plage du Verdon, which are both dog-friendly off-season.

Carcassonne. Quietly tucked away in the south of France, the picturesque medieval city of Carcassonne is worth a quick day trip or a weekend getaway with your dog. At this secluded fairytale town in the Languedoc area, you’ll find some of the most intact old fortifications ever existed. For dog-friendly activities, you can hike up the hills to Cité Médiévale, explore the splendid double city walls, and cross the 14th century 300-meter old bridge, Pont-Vieux, with your dog. Lac de la Cavayere, an enthralling 40-hectare artificial lake, also welcomes on-leash dogs on the pathway and in picnic areas.

This is a guest post by Roger Wellington from Wet Nose Escapades: A Yorkie’s Guide to Healthy Dog Travel . 

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Pet Travel to France: Key Changes from January 1, 2021

Pet Travel to France: Key Changes from January 1, 2021

Following a EU policy decision, the UK government has announced details of NEW documentation required by British people travelling to France with a pet dog, cat or ferret from January 1, 2021.

From this date onwards – the end of the Transition Period – Great Britain will become a ‘third country’ with respect to the EU Pet Travel Scheme.

This means that while a pet passport issued in a EU member state remains valid, a current EU pet passport issued in Great Britain will NOT be valid for travel to France.

Instead, here are the new rules and procedures to follow:

You will need a dual language Animal Health Certificate (AHC), which you can get from your vet (an “Official Veterinarian”) no more than 10 days before travelling. UK vets have been ordered to have the AHCs ready to issue from December 22.

In order to get an AHC, you will need to take proof of your pet’s micro-chipping date and vaccination history.

It is important to note that this new ruling will affect any travellers with pets arriving in an EU Member State after 23:00 GMT on December 31, 2020.

A dog, cat or ferret must be micro-chipped, and vaccinated against rabies and you must wait 21 days after the primary vaccination before travel.

Your pet’s AHC will be valid for:

  • 10 days after the date of issue for entry into France
  • Onward travel within the EU or Northern Ireland for 4 months after date of issue
  • Re-entry to Great Britain for 4 months after the date of issue

Your pet will need a new AHC for each trip to France.

On arrival in France, pet owners travelling with pets will need to enter through a designated travellers’ point of entry (TPE).

If you are a UK national living in France and plan to travel with your pet using a UK-issued pet passport, you should speak to your vet. They will help ensure you are compliant with EU Pet Travel Regulations.

There is good news for anyone who has a pet passport issued by an EU member state, however – you can use it to bring your pet to Great Britain.

See our article on travelling to France with your pet after Brexit .

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Travelling to France with a dog: what you need to know

  For many of us, our four-legged friends are an important part of our lives. So why leave them behind whilst you go on a family holiday?

T ravelling to France with a dog after Brexit has made things a little more complex, but it’s totally achievable provided you plan ahead. That’s why we’ve narrowed down what you need to know before travelling to France with a dog from the UK…

Travel Requirements

Your dog will need to be microchipped on or before the date of their rabies vaccination and the number on their microchip must match the number on their documentation. The microchip will then be detected using a microchip reader at the airline, train or ferry terminal.

Rabies Vaccination

You must get your dog vaccinated against rabies before travelling from the UK to France. You then have to wait a minimum of 21 days before travelling.

Pet Passport or Animal Health Certificate

Proof of vaccination can be in the form of an animal health certificate or in a valid pet passport.

Check the UK Government website for more information on travel requirements to and from France with a pet.

Mode of Transport

Transport options.

Although air travel with a dog is possible, we would recommend driving and taking either a ferry or the Eurotunnel crossing.

While ferry crossings do tend to be cheaper than the Eurotunnel, they take longer and you have to leave your dog in the car whilst you go up to the main deck.

The Eurotunnel is often more expensive but only takes around 40 minutes to cross the channel, plus you get to stay in the car with your dog. For dogs with separation anxiety or those who aren’t good travellers, the Eurotunnel is probably the better option.

You wouldn’t travel in a car without a seatbelt, so why should your dog? Make sure they are secure and comfortable for the trip by installing a dog seat belt and harness, a crate or cage, or a barrier between the boot and the back seat. For extra comfort, you can also purchase car hammocks which create a cosier space for the dog and protect your seats.

Comfort for Everyone On Board

Remember to consider the extra space that a dog will take up when travelling, so ensure that you know where luggage is going to go and perhaps consider purchasing a roof box if necessary.

It’s also important to remember that this may be your dog’s first long trip in a car. Some dogs may find this quite distressing, so ease them into it with training drives f you can. Start with a ten-minute drive and slowly build up to an hour over a couple of days to make sure they are comfortable and happy in their surroundings.

Travelling across France can be long and hot in the summer, even if you have an air-conditioned car. Remember to pack plenty of water for yourself and your dog. Air conditioning actually dehydrates dogs so refill water regularly. A portable dog water bottle is a good idea for when you’re on the move.

There are ‘Aires’ all along the autoroute across France . Be sure to plan to stop every 2-3 hours and let your pet stretch their legs and get a good bit of fresh air and water. If you can, it is best to stop at an ‘Aires de repos’, which do not have any services for your car but will usually have a decent grassy area, picnic tables, places to refill water and also toilets.

If your dog gets car sick, then make sure to mention this to your vet prior to departure as they may be able to prescribe motion sickness medication for the journey.

Discover pet-friendly properties in the French Alps

Pet-friendly accommodation.

Finding pet-friendly accommodation is the next step when planning your holiday to France with your dog. Not all property owners accept pets for a variety of reasons, however, finding suitable self-catered accommodation isn’t difficult considering the vast amount of choice out there.

Some things to look out for are secured gardens, close proximity to great walks and dog-friendly bars/restaurants and a vet surgery nearby just in case of emergency.

OVO Network partners with over 100 pet-friendly properties across the French Alps, check out the fantastic range of chalets and apartments here .

Daily Routine

Finally, don’t forget that if your dog isn’t used to being away from home, then a change of scenery can be quite an adjustment for them! As much as possible, try to keep their daily routine the same as at home.

Although dog food is widely available in France, if you have a fussy dog or one with specific dietary requirements, ensure you pack enough food for the duration of your stay.

The French Alps in particular are a playground for dogs! Fantastic hikes with stunning mountain views, snow to play in and lakes to swim in during summer, make them the ideal spot for a getaway with your four-legged friend. Discover our top recommendations for dog-friendly walks in the French Alps here .

Fancy a dog-friendly holiday in France?

Check our range of pet-friendly properties based in stunning locations across the French Alps…

Hi, I’m Amy. I am a Copywriter and Editor for OVO Network. I have lived between the French Alps and UK and love to share my knowledge of the area with readers!

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What Pet Travel Documents Are Needed to Travel to France?

Every country sets its own rules for importing pets when you move to or visit their country. In France, it is the French Ministry for Agriculture, Food, and Forestry that governs pet importation. The rules differ somewhat, depending on where you live now. For instance, if you and your pet (dog, cat, or ferret) currently reside in another European Union country and your pet has a current EU Pet Passport , you do not need any additional documentation to bring your pet to France.  

However, if you currently reside in a non-EU country, there are specific steps you will need to take in order to bring your pet into France. You can consult this page to get the details , but we have outlined all the essentials below. You will be happy to learn that France’s pet import requirements are less complex than those of many other countries.

But do not take the requirements lightly. Without proper documentation, your pet could be sent back, quarantined, or even euthanized. If your pet causes or contributes to the spread of transmissible disease, you could be fined or worse.

If your pet will not be traveling with you, you will need to sign a consent form for the person who will accompany or be authorized to transport your pet.

Rabies Vaccinations

Rabies is the only immunization required for dogs, cats, and ferrets to enter France. To be considered valid, the rabies vaccine must be administered after your pet is microchipped. All countries make this distinction because each animal’s microchip number is its unique identifier and it has to appear on all documentation.

To enter France, your pet’s microchip must be ISO-compliant. Your pet's microchip must be readable and correctly reported on all of your pet's paperwork. If your pet has more than one microchip that is readable then all paperwork must show both microchip numbers.

The first rabies vaccination given after implantation of a microchip (or at the same time) is considered the “primary” vaccination. This definition also applies to a vaccination given after an earlier rabies vaccine has expired. All pets must wait at least 21 days after the rabies vaccination before they can travel to France. Please note that the rabies vaccination for pets traveling to the EU must be greater than 21 days old and less than 1 year old at the time of travel. If your pet's vaccination will be over 1 year, then a new vaccine will be needed at least 21 days prior to travel.

Other Vaccinations

Although other immunizations are not officially required for import, it is recommended that cats and dogs are vaccinated for the following. Do note that if your pet will be boarding, these vaccinations will be required.

  • Dogs : DHPP (Distemper, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza, Parvovirus), Bordetella (Kennel Cough), Leptospirosis, CIV (Canine Influenza Virus)
  • Cats : FVRCP (Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia), Feline Leukemia

If you are moving from a  non-listed country (where rabies is a known problem or not reliably controlled), your pet will also have to have a rabies titer blood test to prove their rabies vaccine is active within their body. This blood test must be completed in an  approved EU laboratory and must be done at least 30 days after rabies vaccination and at least 3 months prior to travel.

This is not needed when coming from the United States. 

France does not require an import permit for dogs, cats, or ferrets that are personal family pets.

Health Certificate for Dogs

The requirements described below apply only if your dog or cat or ferret will be entering France within 5 days before or after your own arrival date. If the timing difference will be greater than this 5-day window, your pet will need a “commercial” health certificate, which is somewhat different. No worries, though – our Starwood Pet Travel team can easily handle this for you.

You will need a French EU Veterinary Health Certificate that must be endorsed by the official government vet prior to shipment for each pet. It must be filled out and signed by a government-approved (USA Accredited) veterinarian within 10 days prior to travel.  Coming from the USA, the APHIS 7001 form is also required for some airlines but does not need USDA endorsement. France will allow the health certificate to be submitted to the USDA electronically but the USDA endorsement must be in original ink. The original endorsed health certificate and original signed rabies certificate must travel with your pet.

What Are the Pet Restrictions for France?

Like many countries, France does not allow the import of certain breeds of dogs, although there are no restrictions for cats. You can get more information about this here .

If your dog is one of the following breeds, you may not bring them to France unless they have an official, registered pedigree:

  • American Staffordshire terrier (formerly Staffordshire terrier) or “pit bulls”
  • Mastiff or "boerbulls"

If your dog is one of these breeds and does have a registered pedigree, you may import them but you will have to follow certain rules set forth for dangerous dogs . This also applies to Rottweilers and dogs that are “similar to Rottweilers,” with or without a registered pedigree.

France does not allow the import of puppies, kittens, or baby ferrets that are younger than 12 weeks and have no rabies vaccination, or those between 12-16 weeks whose rabies vaccine was administered less than 21 days prior to arrival. 

Do I Need a Microchip for My Pet to Travel to France?

All dogs, cats, and ferrets must have a microchip that meets ISO standard 11784 or 11785. (The number will be 15 digits.) The microchip must be implanted BEFORE the rabies vaccination. If your pet currently has no microchip, that should be your first order of business, because it is a prerequisite for obtaining documentation. If your pet has a microchip that does meet ISO standards, you have options:

  • Carry a chip reader that customs officials can use to scan your pet
  • Notify French customs in advance so they can have an appropriate scanner available
  • Have your veterinarian implant a second, ISO-compliant microchip. This won’t hurt your pet. You will need to include both microchip ID numbers on all of your pet’s paperwork.

What Are the Quarantine Requirements for a Pet Traveling to France?

France does not quarantine pets upon arrival, providing they meet all the stated health requirements.

Are There Any Area Specific Pet Requirements in France?

Although France does not have any other pet import restrictions you will need to know about, airlines also have rules about pet travel. Therefore, it is important to consult your airline (or your Starwood rep) to learn if there are additional rules that apply to your pet’s journey.

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Our France pet shipping services include:

  • Door-to-door transport
  • Assistance with health certificates, import certificates, and other travel documents needed for animal transport to France (outlined above)
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  • Airline-approved flight kennels provided with personalized labels, identification and emergency notification instructions
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  • Local pet taxi service to and from the airport, your home, veterinarian, kennel, or groomer – available in major France cities as well as their surrounding areas
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We will inform you of your pet's full itinerary before the trip and we will update you as your pet travels  to France .

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Taking a Dog to France or Europe- Complete Guide

Taking dog UK to France or Europe after BREXIT 2021- rules on changes to pet passport UK scheme or Great Britain and Northern Ireland differences

Want to take your dog to France (or elsewhere in Europe) after BREXIT? Wondering about the Pet Passport scheme and if you have to get a new rabies test? Here’s everything you need to know about the rule changes for taking a dog or pet from UK to Europe and everything you need to do.

Don’t forget to grab your FREE dog travel checklist below to make things easier

*We work hard to make this the best motorhome travel blog and road trip website possible, full of helpful content for you. The website is supported by our readers, so if you buy through links on this site we may earn a commission- at no extra cost to you. All opinions remain our own .

If you find this post useful, you can also treat us to a coffee – we promise to enjoy it while creating more useful content like this- we might even indulge in a biscuit (or two!)

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Taking a dog to France- the problems

When you’re travelling abroad, there are a million things to think about. If you’re trying to travel abroad with a pet, there are a million more.

In the past, taking a dog from the UK to France was relatively simple; you did the rabies tests, got a pet passport and voila.

Off you could pop whenever you liked, with only a couple of things to remember before you left or when you returned.

Sadly, since BREXIT, travelling abroad with your dog is no longer that simple, even if you just want a quick weekend away in France.

Travelling from the UK to France with a dog after BREXIT

The BREXIT transition period ended on 01 January 2021.

From that moment, several important changes happened regarding taking your pet to France/ Europe from the UK. It also applies to taking a dog to Northern Ireland, even though that’s technically part of the UK.

Here’s everything you need to know and do before you travel.

For this post, we’re focussing on dogs (because that’s what we have!). The rules for cats and ferrets will be similar, but for them and all other pets please do check with your vet to make sure you’ve done everything you need to.

Taking a dog to France from the UK- the basics

There are 3 essential things your dog needs in order to travel with you from the UK to France, Northern Ireland or any other European country:

  • They must be microchipped
  • They must be vaccinated against rabies (more on this below)
  • They must have a valid Animal Health Certificate (AHC)- more on that below too!

With those 3 things, you’re pretty much good to go, but let’s break it down into a little more detail to make sure everything is clear.

I’m assuming the microchipping is self-explanatory, but this is a great time to check your address and contact details on your micro-chip… just in case!

Also, if you co-own the dog (ie- with your spouse) make sure BOTH of your names are on the microchip details, just in case one of you needs to cross the border with the dog.

Watch the video about taking your dog to Europe after BREXIT

Prefer video to text? No problem- here’s the video about taking your dog to France (or Europe!) after BREXIT:

We hope you found the video useful. If you did, we’d love it if you followed us on Youtube . New videos with tips for motorhoming and campervanning in the UK and Europe are released weekly.

Rabies tests after BREXIT

The good news is that rabies tests for dogs become a LOT easier after BREXIT.

Once your dog has the rabies jab, you NO LONGER NEED TO WAIT FOR A RABIES TEST.

Yep, that whole process is now gone (which is good- our poor pup failed his. Three times!)

After BREXIT, all you need is to wait 21 days after the jab- and then you’re ok to travel. Make sure you count correctly- it’s 21 CLEAR days before travel.

NOTE: Your dog must be at least 12 weeks old before they can have the rabies vaccination. They will also need all their other vaccinations too and not all can be given together- you’ll need to talk to your vet to make sure you have enough time.

What if you already HAVE a UK Pet Passport?

Ok, good and bad news.

The bad news is that your UK-issued pet passport is now obsolete. You can no longer travel with your pet with it.

BUT, on the positive side, if you already have a UK pet passport for your dog, that means they’re microchipped and have had a rabies jab in the past.

  • IF THE RABIES VACCINATIONS ARE STILL IN DATE- you don’t need another rabies jab; just keep them up to date
  • IF THE RABIES VACCINATIONS HAVE LAPSED- you will need to visit your vet to get another rabies jab and then wait 21 days before travel.

Do you need repeat rabies vaccinations for each trip?

No. As long as you keep the rabies vaccinations up to date (this could be anywhere from every year to every couple of years, depending on brand and dosage), then you do NOT need a new rabies vaccination for each trip. But make sure you carry the paperwork with you.

Europe Motorhome travel- free checklists

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Getting an animal health certificate (AHC)

Ok, now for the ‘less-good’ part.

EVERY time you take your dog from the UK to France or Europe, you will need to visit your vet in order to get an Animal Health Certificate.

Even if the last one is still in date (they’re valid for up to 4 months, which is hilarious as it technically means your dog can stay in the Schengen area longer than you can!)

How do you get an Animal Health Certificate?

You need to visit your vet no more than 10 days before travel. You must visit an ‘official’ vet- one who is licensed to issue an AHC- not all of them are, so be sure to book well in advance.

At the appointment, you must provide proof of:

  • your pet’s microchip
  • your pet’s vaccination history

How long is an AHC valid for?

The AHC is valid immediately, but you must leave the UK within 10 days to enter the EU or NI. From then, it is valid for

  • onward travel within the EU or NI for 4 months after the date of issue
  • re-entry to the UK for 4 months after the date of issue

What about repeat trips with your dog from the UK to France or Europe?

If you’re like us, you travel as much as possible. In ‘normal’ times (global pandemics aside) we travel back and forth from the UK to France with our dog almost every month.

From now on, if your pet is registered in the UK, you will need a NEW AHC for each trip- even though they are valid for up to 4 months.

Taking your dog to Europe? These might help:

  • Taking your dog to France from the UK? Try a pet-friendly cabin
  • How to keep your dog cool on a road trip
  • Essential dog travel accessories your road trip NEEDS

Our favourite travel gear- click here to see latest deals

travelling dog to france

What if you have several dogs?

You will need an AHC for each pet.

The maximum number of dogs you can travel with as a ‘normal’ person (ie, not a business) is 5, unless for a show, competition or event.

How much does an AHC cost?

Ok, are you sitting down? Our vet will be charging £111 for one single AHC.

Yep, just for one piece of paper that will only be valid for a week or so.

That doesn’t include the costs of any other jabs or vaccinations which may be needed.

Some vets charge as little as £90 and we’ve heard of some charging as much as £150! Some vets will offer a discount for a second dog, so it’s worth shopping around.

What about tapeworm treatment?

If you are travelling with your dog from the UK directly to Finland, Republic of Ireland, NI, Norway or Malta, they must have treatment against tapeworm (Echinococcus multilocularis).

Tapeworm treatment must be given 1 to 5 days before arriving in any of these countries. Your vet must enter full details on the AHC following treatment.

So, do break this down, if you are going motorhome or campervan touring in Norway with a dog, you will need to see a vet for a tapeworm tablet 1-5 days before crossing into Norway, and then you’ll need to see a vet AGAIN for another tapeworm tablet 1-5 days before returning to the UK.

Tapeworm for returning to the UK

As now, you will need to get a tapeworm treatment given to your dog 1-5 days before returning to the UK. This must be marked on the AHC.

If you are returning to the UK directly from Finland, Republic of Ireland, NI, Norway or Malta, you will not need to give your dog a tapeworm treatment before arriving in the UK.

france motorhome travel planner

What happens when you arrive in the EU or NI?

On arrival in the EU or NI, pet owners travelling with pets will need to enter through a designated  travellers’ point of entry (TPE) .

Here, you may need to show the following documents:

  • a valid AHC for each pet
  • microchip details (and scan the pet)
  • rabies vaccination proof
  • tapeworm treatment (if required)

Check the rules of the country you’re travelling to for any additional restrictions or requirements before you travel.

Travelling to Northern Ireland with your pet after BREXIT

Yeah… now it gets even more fun.

You now need an AHC for each trip in order to take your dog or pet to Northern Ireland (unless it has an EU pet passport).

EU Pet Passports for NI-based dogs

NI-based pets and assistance dogs can use an NI issued EU Pet Passport and will not need an animal health certificate. You should contact DAERA or your vet for further information on entrance requirements for returning to NI.

Rules for returning to the UK with your dog

Nothing changes in this process. You will still need an approved tapeworm treatment 1-5 days before travel.

(If you are returning to the UK from France or the EU, here’s our experience of crossing during quarantine .)

Travelling from the EU to the UK on an EU Pet Passport

If you already have an EU Pet Passport- do everything you can to keep it! If you travel regularly, you’ll save yourselves a fortune.

If you’re living in the EU and plan to travel with your pet using a UK-issued pet passport, you should speak to your vet.

If you have a pet passport issued by an EU member state, you can use it to bring your pet to GB.

If you wish to enter the UK with an EU-registered pet, you must have:

  • an EU pet passport (issued in the EU, or in GB before 1 January 2021), or a pet passport from a Part 1 listed third country
  • the AHC issued in GB used to travel to the EU – which you can use up to 4 months after it was issued
  • a GB pet health certificate (for travel into GB only)

Your pet will NOT need this documentation if it’s entering GB from:

  • the Channel Islands
  • the Isle of Man

So there we go. Whether we like it or not, those are the new rules for travelling with your pet from the UK to Europe.

Other posts you might find useful:

  • Our favourite dog travel accessories
  • Unmissable Europe road trip ideas
  • 10 Bizarre European traditions you’ve never heard of!
  • Best places in France for a road trip

See all our dog travel posts

travelling dog to france

Kat never planned to buy a motorhome. She also never planned to quit her job as an air traffic controller, go touring around Europe in said motorhome, start one of the UK’s largest motorhome travel websites… or get a cocker spaniel.

Find out how she went from stuck in the rat race to being a digital nomad and inspiring thousands of people to have their own epic adventures here.

If you’d like to connect with Kat, send her an email or follow her adventures on social media.

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11 comments.

Very helpful thanks very much

Helpful but I cannot see that you have put clearly, that if your pet has an EU issued passport, then it is enough to travel to EU country or NI (plus chip, rabies and tapeworm treatment, where applicable), no need for that ridiculous AHC (which I think they will get rid of eventually, or there will be riots;) )

I have an EU pet passport that my uk vet refused to update, is he allowed to update now or shall I get French vet to update with new rabies jab?

UK vets are not allowed to update the EU passport, if you get annual vaccinations done in the UK they will provide an additional sheet with their vaccinations. However for the EU Pet Passport to remain valid the Rabies booster MUST be done in the EU.

https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/articles/travelling-pets ,I live in NI have been able to travel to uk mainland without all this … alot of us dog owners are trying to get this changed … any current passport is out of date end of dec 2020

What about leaving the UK to travel all over Europe for a year…. Do I get an AHC every months wherever we happen to be???

AHCs will be valid for a single trip into the EU, onward travel within the EU and re-entry to Great Britain. ……… I answered my own question

Thankyou – one of the most understandable pages i’ve found so far! Any chance of advoice on taking 2 tortoise and a cockatiel to france!

You’re welcome- I’m so pleased it was helpful. Sadly, I have no clue regarding tortoises or cockatiels- but your vet should be able to help you. Safe travels!

If your pet has an EU Pet Passport, then providing the Rabies booster is done in an EU country (France in my case) then that EU Passport remains valid and can be renewed as usual by your EU vet once it is full and an new one required. Yearly vaccinations can be done in the UK although UK vets are not allowed to update the EU passport so you will end up with a seperate sheet of paper for them if UK done. There was confusion about the continued use of the Pet Passport if owned just after Brexit but this position was confirmed to me by the French Consulate in writing. However you MUST have the rabies vaccination done in Europe, you can now get a 3 yearly rabies shot.

Hi, Do you have any recommendations regarding travel insurance cover for our dog? The providers we’ve looked at so far seem to all only allow 90 days per policy year, do you know of any cover more? Thanks.

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travelling dog to france

  • Passports, travel and living abroad
  • Travel abroad

Taking your pet dog, cat or ferret abroad

When travelling with your pet dog, cat or ferret abroad, what you need to do will depend on what country you’re going to.

There are different rules for travelling with your pet to an EU country or Northern Ireland and for taking your pet to a non- EU country .

There’s different guidance if you’re bringing your pet dog, cat or ferret to Great Britain .

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What To Know About Traveling Internationally With Your Pets

T raveling internationally with your pet can be a great experience. For one, most of us consider our pets family, so exploring the world or vacationing with our quadrupedal companion can be an exciting proposition. But in some circumstances, it may be difficult — if not impossible — to travel internationally without your pet. Boarding costs and pet-sitting fees can be astronomical, and without calling in favors from family or friends, you may not be in a situation to leave your pet stateside for an extended period of time.

Knowing how to travel with a dog internationally (or cat) wisely can be the difference between a rewarding experience and a hassle-plagued trip. Taking your pet requires forethought, in-depth research, and savvy trip planning. While the idea of traveling with your furry confidant may be appealing, it's also a big responsibility with its own unique considerations, probably dictating what airlines you take, where you plan to stay, and the experiences you'll have.

That said, the reward of sharing your travels with your pet can make the effort, expenses, and sacrifices well worth it. But to avoid major problems, you'll need to be well-acquainted with everything traveling internationally with your pet entails.

Finding A Pet-Friendly Flight

To begin planning your international adventure, it's imperative to research the various pet policies across different airlines. Most major airlines allow small dogs and cats to fly in the cabin with you, as long as they're placed in an FAA-approved pet carrier that fits comfortably under the seat. If you're the pet parent of a small dog or cat, you'll still need to check your flight before purchasing a ticket. Typically, airlines only allow a certain amount of pets on a flight, so you need to ensure a spot's available for your pet before purchasing your own ticket.

If your dog isn't small enough to fit under the seat in front of you, things get a bit more complicated. The only U.S.-based carriers that allow dogs to fly in the cargo hold are Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, and Hawaiian. Fortunately, international airlines tend to be a bit more accommodating. Air France, Swiss, Turkish Airlines, Lufthansa, TAP, SAS, British Airways, Alitalia, KLM, and Japan Airlines all currently allow larger pets to fly in cargo.

Pet Policies And Alternative Transport Options

It's important to note that some, but not all, airlines also have breed restrictions for the dogs they allow to fly in the cargo hold . These restrictions are typically imposed on short-nosed breeds, such as boxers, bulldogs, Boston terriers, and others, as these Brachycephalic breeds are prone to breathing difficulties. Overall, it's a good idea to contact the airline directly concerning any questions regarding breed restrictions.

If you're unable to find a flight that can accommodate you and your pet, whether due to breed restrictions or other factors, there's still hope. You may have the option to ship your pet through a commercial transport company, but you'll need to ensure the company is part of the International Pet and Animal Transportation Association (IPATA), a regulated organization that adheres to ethical safety standards. 

If you are trying to travel with your pug or bulldog, IPATA works with airlines and transport companies that may accommodate your pet. IPATA created a Brachycephalic Certification Program that allows these types of breeds to fly after passing a fit-to-fly assessment. These specialized assessments can be conducted by a certified veterinarian, and the results are given to the airlines and companies partnering with IPATA, helping to ensure the safety of your dog. 

The Cost Of Flying With Your Pet

Airline pet fees aren't cheap. If your pet is small enough to fly in the cabin, the fees can be up to a few hundred dollars one-way, but these prices increase dramatically if the pet is traveling in the cargo hold. The cost will depend on the airline, the route (with or without layovers), and the size of the crate. 

In most cases, when traveling with a pet, it's wise to spend up for a direct flight versus trying to save with layovers if your pet is in the cargo hold. But if your itinerary must include a layover or multiple, many airlines require a three-hour minimum time window between your connecting flights. This gives the airline ample time to feed, give water, and walk your dog to use the bathroom, but fair warning, these services aren't cheap. It's always a good idea to check with the airline to learn more about their specific policies.

If a direct flight isn't possible, then try to at least stick to the same airline. In simplest terms, changing airlines in a foreign country will require you to claim your dog from cargo, then pay another pet fee to the new airline. You'll also need to clear your dog through customs.

Paperwork And Health Assessments

Before you depart, you'll need to make sure your pet's paperwork is in order. While countries differ in their requirements, most require the following at minimum. First, you'll need to take your pet to a veterinarian to receive an international health certificate no more than 10 days before departure (or entry to the foreign country). You'll also need proof of a rabies vaccination taken within the last year for most destinations, as well as governmental export paperwork.

In addition, some countries require blood titer tests for rabies and proof of parasite prevention treatments. You need to research the requirements carefully of the particular country to ensure you have the proper paperwork, as the requirements are not flexible. Your pet will also require an ISO-compliant microchip, which is the world standard. If you need to update your pet's vaccinations, many countries require that the microchip be implanted before the pet receives its vaccinations. Finally, while most countries do not require a quarantine period upon entry, some rabies-free and island nations do, such as Australia, Japan, Hong Kong, and Iceland. The length of quarantine varies by country. 

Prepping Your Pet For Flight

Along with knowing how to travel with a dog internationally in financial and regulatory terms, it's equally as important to prepare your pet for the trip, especially if it's a long-haul flight. For instance, if your pet isn't used to being in a crate, then it's a good idea to acquaint your pet with one for a few weeks before the flight. This could mean requiring them to sleep in a crate or leaving them in one for periods of time.

Same idea with puppy pads. Whether they're flying in the cabin or the cargo hold, your fur buddy will probably be expected to use a pet relief area at some point. Flying can be a stressful experience for a pet, but introducing them to a crate and pads beforehand may help the situation.

While traveling internationally with a pet can be costly and time-consuming, it can also be an extremely rewarding experience after the rigmarole, as long as you plan carefully and know what to expect.

Read this next: Insider Hacks And Little-Known Facts: 12 Secrets Of Inflight Beverage Service

girl with dog on mountain

Travelnuity

Can I Take My Dog to France From the UK?

Prior to Brexit, it was easy to take your dog to France from the UK. Since then, it is no longer as simple, but it is still a straightforward process – you can still take your dog to France. Find out the requirements for taking a dog to France from the UK, plus the different transport options available, regardless of whether you want to take your own car.

Taking a Dog to France

Paperwork to Take a Dog to France from the UK

Since Brexit, the main thing you need to take your dog to France is to get an EU animal health certificate from a vet. The certificate needs to be completed within 10 days of your entry to the EU.

To be issued this certificate, your pet will also require a microchip and a valid rabies vaccination, given at least 21 days before your date of travel.

Double check with your vet in advance that they can issue these certificates – only “official veterinarians” can issued them. I’ve heard reports that the fees are often quite high – double check in advance.

I’ve heard recommendations for Abbeywell Vets located in Folkestone, close to the Eurotunnel terminal and the Dover ferry port, thanks to their reasonable prices. You can request an EU animal health certificate online for collection when you arrive in Folkestone.

Note that this step isn’t required if you have an EU or Northern Ireland-issued pet passport for your pet, with an up-to-date rabies vaccine given within the EU or Northern Ireland.

can i take my dog to france

Travelling to France with a Dog by Car

If you are travelling to France from England in your own car, there are two main options available that allow you to take your dog: either the Eurotunnel or a ferry.

Taking the Eurotunnel with a Dog

Probably the easiest way to travel to France with a pet (and return to England) is on the Eurotunnel.

If taking the Eurotunnel, your dog stays in your car along with you, and the actual crossing only takes 35 minutes, although you may need to queue. There is an additional charge of £22 per pet.

At both Folkestone (UK) and Calais (France), prior to checking in, you will need to report to the Pet Reception Centre. At this point your pet’s paperwork will be checked. Allow extra time for this step.

See further details on the Eurotunnel website .

taking my dog to france from uk

Taking Dogs to France on the Ferry

The other alternative if you have your own vehicle is to take a cross channel ferry. There’s a wide variety of ferries available, departing from different ports in England and arriving in different ports in France.

The facilities onboard the ferries for pets vary. While some ferries require your pet to remain in your vehicle, other ferries have pet-friendly cabins and kennels. I compare the different options in my guide to taking dogs on the ferry to France .

If leaving your dog in your vehicle, it’s best to choose the shorter ferries during summer. However, a new development in 2023 has been the introduction of pet lounges on the P&O ferries between Dover and Calais.

Instead of leaving your dog in your car, you can travel together in the lounge, with access to an outside exercise deck. A fee applies for access, with only dogs allowed.

If taking a ferry with your dog to France, let the company know at the time of booking that you will be travelling with a pet. Fees for pets vary between £15 to £29 per pet.

can you take your dog to france from uk

Travelling to France with a Dog without a Car

It’s slightly trickier taking a dog to France from the UK, if you aren’t taking your car across the channel.

Are Dogs Allowed on the Eurostar to London?

One of the easiest ways to travel from London to Paris, if you aren’t taking along your own car, is by taking the Eurostar train. It’s even quick enough for a day-trip.

However, while dogs are allowed on trains in both England and France, unfortunately, dogs are not allowed on the Eurostar between London and Paris . There are no signs that this will change in the future.

Flying to France with a Dog

When travelling to France, it’s possible to fly to France from the UK with your small dog in the cabin.

There are some airlines that allow dogs to fly in the cabin when flying out of the UK . One option is Air France. While they don’t clearly state whether this is allowed in their pet policy, I’ve heard reports from multiple people that this is possible.

Schnitzel in his carrier bag inside the cabin

Unfortunately, though, no airlines allow dogs to fly in the cabin or as check-in baggage into the UK, so you’ll need to make different plans for your return journey.

Taking the Ferry to France as a Foot Passenger

There are limited options to take a cross channel ferry to France with your dog, if you’re travelling as a foot passenger, rather than with a vehicle. The majority of ferry crossings don’t allow foot passengers to bring on board dogs, if they allow foot passengers at all.

There is only one option available to France – the DFDS Seaways ferry from Newhaven to Dieppe. You can combine the ferry trip with a train on either side. The dock in Newhaven is next to the train station, while the dock in Dieppe is just a short taxi ride from the train station, and a couple of hours from Paris on regional trains.

Read my review of taking the DFDS Seaways ferry from Dieppe to Newhaven with my dog . You can use this option to travel from London to Paris with a dog without a car, or vice versa.

DFDS Ferry Dieppe to Newhaven with a Dog

Taking a Shuttle or Taxi on the Eurotunnel

It’s not possible for foot passengers to travel on the Eurotunnel, with or without pets. Instead, if you’re wanting to use this quick option to travel from England to France and you don’t have a car, you can instead make a booking with a pet-friendly shuttle or taxi.

One relatively new but increasingly popular option is Le Pet Express , which offers shared minibus shuttles on the Eurotunnel, between Ashford International rail station and Calais Frethun rail station. Check in advance what days and times they are operating and make a booking in advance – they often book out!

Alternatively, you can take a private taxi, such as Happy Saluki Pet Transport , Folkestone Taxis (also known as Pet Travel Abroad) or Pet Moves . These taxi can take you just between Folkestone Central station and either Calais Ville or Calais Fréthun station, or alternatively the entire journey from London to Paris.

Dog in St Tropez

  • Travelling in France with a Dog

For tips on enjoying your time in France with your dog, including information on taking dogs on public transport in France and ideas for dog-friendly sightseeing, check out my guide to travelling in France with a dog .

Also keep in mind that France has restrictions on some breeds of dogs they regard as dangerous. Check the full details in my guide.

Returning to the UK with Your Dog

Before returning to the UK with your dog, you’ll need to have your dog wormed by a vet. This needs to be done between 5 days (120 hours) and 24 hours before returning to the UK, based on your arrival time in the UK.

If you travelled to France using an EU animal health certificate and less than four months has elapsed since the certificate was issued, this certificate is valid for your return to the UK and the worming treatment can be recorded on it.

Alternatively, the worming treatment needs to be recorded in an EU pet passport, or on a new GB pet health certificate.

The same transport options apply when returning to the UK with your dog, except dogs are not allowed in the cabin on flights into the UK, unless they’re a service dog.

Getting a French Pet Passport

If you regularly travel to France or elsewhere in the EU with your pet, it is worthwhile considering getting an EU pet passport for your pet, such as a French pet passport. 

This will make it easier for you to travel around the EU with your pet, as all your pet’s vaccination and other information is stored in one place, plus you won’t need to have a health certificate completed each time and endorsed by the government veterinarian.

French pet passport

Unfortunately, since Brexit, it has become harder to get a pet passport in France , with many veterinarians, particularly in France, requiring you show proof of residency.

Read more about getting an EU pet passport for your dog .

You May Also Like

  • How to Travel with a Dog Between the UK and Europe
  • Taking Dogs on the Ferry to France from the UK

About the Author

Photo of Shandos & Schnitzel

Shandos Cleaver is the founder of Travelnuity: Dog-Friendly Travel. She has travelled extensively with her Miniature Dachshund, Schnitzel, including to 33 countries across Europe, every state and territory of Australia except Tasmania, and 10 of the United States. She’s passionate about providing inspiration and information to others wanting to travel with their dogs, whether close to home or internationally.

43 thoughts on “Can I Take My Dog to France From the UK?”

I have a pet passport for my 4kg dog who had her rabies vaccination but though Air France accepts dogs in cabin from England to France, the return is another story as even in hold, dogs are not accepted back to England. They don’t make things easy for travelling with your pets.

Corinne – yes, I know! To get back to England from France, their is one ferry that allows foot passengers to bring a dog, or else I’ve heard lots of praise for the taxi option, like Folkestone Taxis. I cover this more here: http://www.travelnuity.com/dog-travel-between-uk-europe/ .

I have a question where I cannot find details online regarding our situation. We are from the Uk, we have a small dog that has a Uk pet passport with up to date rabies vaccine and microchip. We travelled to Canada 6 months ago with her in the cabin on a pet health certificate. We are now due to return to the Uk, via Paris as she is again travelling in the cabin. My question is, will her Uk pet passport be sufficient to access France, or will we need a pet health certificate from Canada as she’s been here for 6 months? Also can we have her tapeworm pill for the Uk completed by a vet in Canada for her Uk entry? Thank you so much your website is other wise extremely helpful and informative.

Stuart – As the UK is still part of the EU, her UK pet passport will be fine to return to France, unless she’s had a rabies vaccine meanwhile done in Canada. (It still should be fine after Brexit too, but the legislation will need to be updated.)

The worming treatment will be fine to be done in Canada. I’ve heard two different opinions about vets from outside of the EU writing in an EU pet passport – that they just can’t add a rabies vaccine, or that they shouldn’t record anything at all. To be on the safe side, have it certified separately, clearly stating the time and time zone. Your airline might also require a health certificate, so have this done at the same time.

I have a Labrador Mastiff cross. Can I take him on a week’s holiday to France from UK?

I’ve written more about the French laws for dangerous dog breeds in this post: http://www.travelnuity.com/travel-with-dangerous-dog-breed/ . Based on the French rules for mastiffs and mastiff-crosses, I would leave your dog behind. It’s not worth the potential issues that may arise. My only caveat is that if the dog doesn’t look like a mastiff-cross (just a labrador-cross), you may be okay. I’m really sorry about this.

Hello! Maybe a weird question, but do they actually check the dates of the vaccination for rabbies? I’ll be travelling within the EU but my cat was too young to be vaccinated before, and now we are leaving less than 21 days after her vaccination… Knowing that they don’t even do passport checks within EU, I’m wondering about cat’s passport checks… Were your dog’s vaccination controlled?

Within the EU, I didn’t have my dogs passport checked when crossing borders, except for when arriving in the UK and Malta. I doubt that your cat’s passport will be checked, although there is a slight chance if you’re flying, very unlikely if you’re taking a train or driving.

I just recently came into France from the US with my dog 4 days ago and none of her paperwork was checked when we entered CDG. I had my passport checked and stamped as usual and was just ushered through. Does this mean my dog is considered undeclared? I’m leaving CDG tomorrow morning and was nervous about there being an issue in case her certificate needed to be stamped. Please let me know if you are aware whether or not those travel certificates get stamped by Customs.

Shawn – It’s quite common that the paperwork isn’t checked at CDG. I’ve only heard of the lack of a stamp being an issue for someone travelling on to the UK with their dog (UK border control is quite strict) but they were able to explain their situation and pass through. Generally it is no issue and isn’t checked again.

We plan to travel from the UK to France This was very useful. Thank you:)

Great to hear, thanks Hanna!

Hi! We need to move to France from the UK very soon for work and the day we need to be there is going to be exactly 21 days from her rabies vaccine. We are driving there and we are thinking about crossing the border two days before that on the eurotunnel, I know ideally you have to wait 21 days but do you think we have chances of crossing two days before?

Rocio – Usually when crossing from the UK to France the passport is not checked (or at least closely checked), unlike when crossing the opposite way. I think you’ve got a good chance! The situation will change once Brexit is finalised, but luckily that hasn’t happened yet.

Hi Rocio Very interested to hear how you get on – we are in a very similar position with our dog.

Also interested to know about this as we’ve just realised our dog’s rabies vaccine has expired (his booster appointment was cancelled due to Covid) and we’re due to arrive in France in 2 weeks time. I’ve never known them to check documents going to France, only on returning, by which time it will be over 21 days. What could happen if they realise the vaccine wasn’t given before 21 days?

If they checked the passport and rabies vaccine at the border, they could deny entry to your dog, and then you’d need to change your plans. If it isn’t checked at the border, I don’t think anything would happen in France, as there’s not record of when your dog entered France (no passport stamp) and the 21 day rule only applies for border crossings.

Although I have heard from a friend living in France that they check for the rabies vaccine on the ferry to Corsica, despite still being in France, but they have a special rule that treats it like a border crossing.

Hi, I am in Greece with my dog at the moment – when we return to the uk we usually travel through – Italy,Swizzerland, Luemburg, Belgium and France – I have been told that after Brexit I will no longer be able to travel through France to get back, I will have to go through Holland, I cannot find anything to back this up

Linda – I haven’t heard that anywhere! Pets will need to travel to the UK by approved routes, but that should include both France and the Netherlands. Mind you, the changes following Brexit are yet to be finalised, as discussed in my Brexit post.

hi there! I ve already travelled with my dog from uk to France like 2 years ago..and we are planning to travel again in the end of the month. she had already rabies vaccine and passport done! just one question how many days before the travel she needs health check and the authorization from the vet on the passport? because che did health check on 26 June and we are leaving UK on the 26 of July. she will need another health check?

There’s no health check required to travel from the UK to France, at least until the Brexit transition period finishes at the end of the year. All that you need is the pet passport and the rabies vaccine, at least 21 days before travel. Don’t also forget the worming treatment to return to the UK.

Hi I’m a little unclear if we travel to France for a short stay! I have a 5 month puppy and already have his passport and rabies injections and he was wormed around 3 weeks ago – can we have a short trip In August without any vet requirements on either side?

Lisa – There’s nothing extra needed to take your dog to France, but when coming back to the UK you’ll need to visit the vet to have a worming treatment done. This needs to be done between 24 hours and 5 days before returning to the UK. If your trip to France is short enough, you can even do it in the UK before you leave. The worming treatment specifically needs to contain praziquantel or an equivalent proven to be effective against the Echinococcus multilocularis tapeworm – not all worming tables that you administer at home have this ingredient or similar. (Vets will know which one to use.)

Hi, I’m intrigued that more people do not ask about how easy/ difficult it is to book your dog in to a French vet for worming before returning to the UK. I would have thought this was quite diffcult to book and plan when on holiday and due to not being regular attendees at whichever vet you select to visit in France.

I think it is easier than you would expect, as vets are familiar with the process and happy with the one-off appointments. However, I’ve heard that the vets around Calais tend to charge more for the worming, so it’s better to have it done earlier.

Hiya, Can I please check something. As I will be travelling with my dog from UK to France this year. Can I please check health certificate from vet is not necessary? As long dog is vaccinated for rabbis, have passport and it’s microchipped ? As some websites mention health certificates ?

There’s no need to get a health certificate from the vet this year, prior to the end of Brexit transition. It’s still to be finalised what is happening next year.

Hi! i’m going with my dog, from uk to frank on december 30th! My dog came from france to uk on october 30th, her vaccine is still valid, because took it in october! in that case you don’t have this 21-day process correct? I o Lu hace to to i Thi j so! congratulations for the web! very explanatory and helps a lot of people! Thanks!

There’s no wait required, as the rabies vaccine is still valid. Wishing you all the best!

Hi there! I arrived into CDG yesterday and with jet lag, I didn’t realize I needed to stop at customs and declare my dog (he doesn’t have pet passport yet). No one asked me to see his paperwork, so although I thought it was strange, I didn’t think anything of it. Now I’m seeing that I could be fined and my dog confiscated if not declared!! What should I do?? I thought I just had to take him to the vet within ten days to complete his pet passport!

I think this happens to plenty of people arriving in France with dogs, I don’t think there are ever any repercussions. Although normally they would stamp the certificate and I this lack of stamp was picked up when another couple I knew then travelled on to the UK, but they were still waved through. Also, I haven’t previously heard of a need to get a pet passport within 10 days. The EU animal health certificate is valid for 4 months travel around the EU, as long as the rabies vaccine is still valid.

Hi We live in France with 2 dogs, travel to the UK occasionally. The dogs have French Passports so…. No Titre test in the passport, can i take them to the UK for a 2 week holiday and return? The French Douane website says no, the vet says yes??????

My guess is the website has not yet been updated. As of mid-December 2020, it was confirmed no titre test is required for dogs to travel from the UK to the EU. There is just the usual worming treatment going to the UK. Plus I expect you will now show your pet passport when coming back to France, whereas in the past it was not usually checked when leaving the UK. On the Eurotunnel website, there is a map showing the new animal reception centre in Folkestone.

Hi, I just wanted to say that United does fly in cabin dogs in their transatlantic flights. I just booked a flight from San Francisco to Tel Aviv with United. The cost was $125 per way.

That’s great to hear! I’ll be updating this article soon.

Hi…I am going to travel with my Dachshund to France. My daughter thinks its crazy that I am bringing a stroller for her. I plan to do a lot of walking and It would be a lot for her. Is it common to see dog strollers or will I really stick out? Also, I plan to read your blog on things to do in Paris with my dog. How is it these days with COVID? I have my vaccines and am working on the permission on moving around France. Is it nice enough to just spend a few days walking around with her and just enjoy being there in Paris. I am also going to be on the SW Coast. Any helpful suggestions well appreciated. Thank you! My dog looks similar to yours, but long hair!!!

Hi Sheri – I can’t remember seeing many dog strollers in Europe during my extended stay (2017 to 2018), but I believe they’re becoming more common – at least that’s the case in my home country of Australia, and I want to get one for Schnitzel when he gets older.

I’m not sure how Paris is with Covid at the moment, because I’ve had to delay returning to Europe, but I believe you need a vaccine passport to enter many places. It’s definitely worthwhile just spending a few days wandering around! My husband and I did a long walk along the Seine on one day and were exhausted – we should have split it into multiple days, there’s so much to see just walking.

Hi. Im thinking of buying a puppy within the EU. I know rules have changed. But what is the age you can bring a puppy cross border. It used to be 10 weeks but has this now changed because of timing on Rabies injection

According to the UK government website, https://www.gov.uk/bring-pet-to-great-britain/rabies-vaccination-boosters-and-blood-tests , dogs need to be at least 12 weeks old before they can be vaccinated for rabies, and then need to wait at least 21 days until travelling into the UK. Additionally, if pets are being sold into/rehomed in the UK, additional rules apply – this is linked to on the UK government website, but I am not across this area.

I know this question has been asked and answered. I’m just curious if there have been any recent experiences about entering France from another EU country before the 21 day time period after the rabies vaccine. We’re about to buy plane tickets from Barcelona to Paris we are hoping to get our new puppy home.

Generally pet passports are not checked when driving or taking a train across the border, but they usually are when flying. I’m not sure if the rabies vaccine dates are usually checked (they definitely check for a rabies vaccine) but I’d say it’s risky.

Hi! I’m trying to find some information on taking my dog on a ferry from Dover. We’d like to travel around midnight and we’re concerned the ‘dog people’ are not working 24/7. Do you know if you can travel with pets on ferries at all times? Or maybe you know where I could ask to get an answer? Thank you!

I haven’t heard about restricted hours for travelling with dogs. (And night time trips are often best in summer, when it can be warm.) to be certain, contact the ferry company, by phone or email.

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9 of the Best Places to Retire in Europe

Thinking about moving abroad in your golden years? Consider these European destinations.

travelling dog to france

More and more seniors in recent years have been opting for retirement abroad. In fact, the Social Security Administration reports that more than 700,000 Americans receive their monthly payments in foreign countries. Europe is an especially popular destination for these international moves, and a number of enticing factors explain why. Some retirees want to experience the culture of their ancestors. Others may have enjoyed vacations in Europe and want to spend more time there. Depending on the country or city, European destinations can also have a cost of living, climate, environment, or lifestyle that's tempting to a retiree in search of a new home base.

Each country has different rules on visas and residency qualifications, but in general, most require evidence of a minimum income level and private health coverage. Many have restrictions on retirees having jobs or owning property, while others have provisions for both. Americans living abroad must still file a federal tax return, though some countries have treaties that prevent double taxation on retirees' income. Keep in mind that Medicare does not pay for health care abroad, though some European countries allow legal residents to participate in the local national health program.

With so many considerations, it's advisable to obtain professional advice on taxes and to research health care, visa and residency requirements, rental costs, infrastructure, and language. The U.S. State Department is an excellent resource for anyone considering retirement abroad.

If you're ready to make the leap, though, this list is here to help. We've looked into the latest policies and trends, and these are nine of the best places in Europe to move to when you retire.

Algarve, Portugal

Gorgeous white-sand beaches, warm Atlantic waters, ideal year-round weather, and an array of outdoor activities await retirees in this region on Portugal's southern coast . Historic towns like Silves boast beautiful Moorish architecture, while a bustling local airport and the relative proximity of Lisbon make the region easy to access. Considered one of the best places in the world to retire , the Algarve offers an extraordinary selection of golf courses, a healthy lifestyle, Mediterranean diet, and low cost of living. Best of all for monolingual seniors, English is widely spoken.

Legal residents are able to register with the National Health Service to get pay-as-you-go access to public hospitals and health centers, though it's worth noting that obtaining private health insurance is required as a condition of receiving a residence permit. (Other requirements include a passport and proof of income.) These permits are mandatory for retirees wanting to stay longer than three months, though once a permit is issued, it remains valid for five years. Residents can also apply for a permanent permit when the initial one expires. If you want to simply make a long visit rather than moving to the country, that's doable too: no visa is needed for stays of fewer than 90 days within a six-month period.

Income is generally taxed, but Portugal offers 10 years with no tax on retirement pensions under certain qualifications of its Non-Habitual Resident (NHR) program.

Bordeaux, France

A lovely riverfront city in southwestern France, Bordeaux enjoys warm summers and mild winters. Conveniently situated a short drive from the Atlantic Ocean and close to a multitude of renowned wineries , the city has much to offer both visitors and residents. Museums, galleries, concert halls, public parks, restaurants, cafes, outdoor markets, and lively nightlife are all plentiful. Getting here (and traveling once you've settled in) is also easy, thanks to a modern system of high-speed trains that connect Bordeaux to various cities in France and across Europe.

France's health care system has been recognized as one of the best in the world, and, fortunately for would-be residents, it's accessible even to noncitizens under certain conditions. If you live in the country for three consecutive months and stay for a minimum of 183 days per year, you're eligible to apply for public health care.

A long-stay visa is required to remain in France for more than 90 days, and this must be obtained while still in the United States. To apply, you'll need to provide your local French consulate with a passport, extra photos, and proof of financial self-sufficiency and confirmed housing, among other documents.

Budapest, Hungary

Alisha McDarris/Travel + Leisure

With beautiful historic buildings, excellent restaurants, thermal baths, and friendly citizens, Budapest is becoming a popular retirement destination for both Europeans and Americans. The city developed a reputation in the early 2000s for affordability, and, though prices have risen since, the cost of living is still appealingly low — think $1,000-a-month rent and high-end dinners for $50.

Hungary is a member of the European Union, making continental travel a breeze (though remember that the country uses its own currency, the forint). A rich culture, vibrant nightlife, and a location on the Danube have attracted a large international community, which means English speakers are easy to find.

Foreigners are permitted to buy property in Budapest, and the health care system is generally regarded as good. Foreign retirees can become eligible for permanent residency after just three years of living continuously in Hungary, as long as they meet certain criteria like having a stable home or apartment in the country.

Ljubljana, Slovenia

This capital city of about 295,000 is an emerging favorite among retirement-age expats. A former Yugoslav republic, Slovenia has been independent since 1991 and a European Union member since 2004, and it boasts a rich culture and diverse natural environment . A wide range of attractions can be found within a few hours' drive of Ljubljana, from Adriatic beaches and Alpine ski resorts to the Italian city of Venice. Slovenia has a long history of winemaking and several UNESCO World Heritage sites, one of which is located in the center of Ljubljana. The capital also offers a charming mix of old and new architecture and a walkable urban core that's on par with many better-known European cities — but without the throngs of tourists.

No visa is required here for stays of up to 90 days. If you wish to stay longer than that, you'll begin by applying for a temporary residence permit. People with Slovene heritage can expedite the permit process, so fire up the ancestry test if you're interested in relocating. Health care is considered adequate, and many people purchase private health insurance if they are not eligible for the public program. Income is taxable on residents, but double taxation can be avoided with proper IRS filing.

Split, Croatia

Growing in popularity as a tourist destination, Croatia is also quite attractive as a retirement location. Not only does the country have approximately 3,600 miles of coastline, but warm, dry summers and mild winters create a desirable climate — particularly in beach towns like Split, which is Croatia's second-largest city. The Roman emperor Diocletian built his palace in Split, and its remains have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. Restaurants, bars, cultural and entertainment venues, and many English-speaking residents make it relatively easy to adapt.

U.S. citizens who intend to stay longer than 90 days must apply for a temporary residence permit , and once you've lived in Croatia for five years, you become eligible for permanent residency. U.S. citizens are also permitted to purchase real estate in Croatia. Health care is considered adequate, and English-speaking doctors are available.

Alicante, Spain

Rory Fuller/Travel + Leisure

Located on Spain's southeastern coast, Alicante offers exquisite beaches, dynamic nightlife, and historic attractions. The climate is the most famous draw here — the warm, waterfront city has been called the sunniest in Europe — but the culinary scene is equally impressive. Reasonably priced dining options range from casual to elegant, with fresh seafood and the artisan stalls of the Alicante Central Market being particular highlights.

With a population of just over 330,000, Alicante has all the amenities of a major city, yet it maintains a reputation for being cozy and friendly. It's well connected to destinations across Spain thanks to an excellent rail system, and the bustling Alicante-Elche Airport also helps makes travel a breeze.

High-end housing can certainly be found here given Alicante's longtime popularity with foreign nationals, but it's also possible to rent modest homes for under $1,000 per month or to purchase them for as little as $100,000. Health care also tends to be affordable, and, as is the case throughout Spain, it's regarded as being of exceptional quality, with state-of-the-art equipment and highly trained doctors. Non-Europeans looking to retire in Spain should contact their local Spanish embassy to apply for a long-stay retirement visa, which must be renewed annually. After five years, you can apply for permanent residency.

Valletta, Malta

Valletta is the tiny capital city of Malta, a country composed of three islands in the Mediterranean Sea about 60 miles south of Sicily. Though only 5,700 people live in the city proper, it punches above its weight in terms of history and culture, with the entire place being recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Appealing features include historic architecture (many buildings date back as far as the 16th century) and a picturesque coastal location on a peninsula between two sheltered harbors. Serviceable public transit and strong walkability add to the ease of living here.

The main language besides Maltese is English, and the country has a large population of expats from the U.K., Australia, and the U.S. Affordability is another draw: one-bedroom apartments in the capital region can rent for as low as $750 a month, and groceries and restaurant dining are also reasonably priced.

Private health care in Malta is recommended for non-EU expatriates, and is both highly rated and inexpensive compared to U.S. options. Malta and the U.S. have a treaty in place for relief from double taxation on income. Plus, residency can be established in several ways, making relocation to Malta accessible for retirees.

Kinsale, Ireland

Situated on the southern coast of the Republic of Ireland , Kinsale is a historic town known for its colorful architecture and thriving maritime culture. For retirees who enjoy the outdoors, this could be an ideal spot. The waterfront offers beaches, fishing, and boating opportunities, while cycling, hiking, and horseback riding are all available on shore. One of the country's most beautiful golf courses, Old Head, is nearby, and even for non-golfers, it's the perfect place for a walk among sea breezes and stunning views.

English is spoken, of course, and foodies will appreciate the abundance of restaurants and fresh seafood. The weather is mild, and the proximity of the city of Cork (30 minutes to the north) makes rail travel and international flights easy to access. Living costs are comparable to those in the United States, though housing prices have been increasing across Ireland in recent years.

In order to stay beyond three months, visa applicants must prove adequate income (around $54,000 annually) and substantial savings. Temporary residence visas can be renewed annually for five years, at which point the duration is extended to five years per visa. Private health coverage is advised, and health care is considered good.

Prague, Czech Republic

This unique and captivating city is particularly welcoming to foreigners — it's home to more than 200,000 expatriates and a growing number of retirees. Nicknamed the City of a Hundred Spires, Prague was mostly spared in World War II, as evidenced by its colorful Baroque and Gothic architecture. The entire Old Town has been named a World Heritage site, yet the Czech Republic's capital is a modern city with high standards of living, world-class art and museums, diverse cuisine, and a range of historic pubs and inventive breweries.

Affordable rents can be found just outside the city center, including in many impressively modern apartments. Centrally located in Europe, Prague is a great base from which to explore all of the continent. Plus, its health care system is among Europe's best. Health insurance is mandatory yet comes at a reasonable cost, and there are plenty of high-quality, well-trained doctors, many of whom speak English. U.S. citizens or other non-EU residents wishing to retire in Prague must obtain a long-term visa , beginning with an application at their most convenient Czech consulate. Permanent residency can be applied for after living legally in the Czech Republic for five years.

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The Paris Olympics Promise to Be Stunning. The Prices Already Are.

Want a prime spot to watch 10,000 athletes float by on the Seine or to catch beach volleyball in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower? Get ready for sticker shock.

A statue of the Olympic rings stands outside the ornate, stone Paris City Hall building under a partly cloudy sky.

By Liz Alderman

Reporting from Paris

The opening ceremony of the 2024 Paris Olympics promises to be spectacular: On the glittering waters of the Seine, a flotilla of barges will carry about 10,000 athletes to the foot of the Eiffel Tower, as nearly half a million spectators line the four-mile route to cheer on the event of the century.

Good luck, though, getting any one of the 100,000 ticketed seats to be front and center at the party. Those are mostly sold out — and the few left cost an eye-popping 2,700 euros, about $2,930 each. Tickets to watch another popular Olympic event, 10-meter men’s platform diving , are now only available through special-service hospitality packages starting at €875, or women’s artistic gymnastics finals , a perennial crowd pleaser: around €1,799.

Paris Olympics organizers set a lofty goal for what they have called the People’s Games, promising to make the world’s most iconic sporting event equitable and accessible.

But get ready to pay up.

Seven months before the Olympic torch casts a glow in the City of Light this summer, the cost of getting into the most in-demand sports competitions, not to mention the price of accommodations and transportation, has risen — sometimes by Olympian proportions.

Many hotels and rental apartments have doubled or tripled their typical summer rates (think an average of €1,000 a night instead of €300), and some have even quintupled them. Airfares are rising fast. The cost of a Paris Metro ticket is temporarily doubling . Even the Louvre Museum and Palace of Versailles have ratcheted up admission fees.

Still dreaming of making the Olympic rendezvous? Don’t be too discouraged if you haven’t booked yet. The Games, which run from July 26 to Aug. 11, still have some ticket deals for large-crowd competitions like soccer and basketball. Spots also remain available for the Paralympics, from Aug. 28 to Sept. 8. And some prices could start to come down closer to the Games.

Paris will be its own extraordinary attraction, transformed into a giant outdoor arena with competitions like break dancing at Place de la Concorde and beach volleyball at the Eiffel Tower. And President Emmanuel Macron will make cultural performances of all kinds free for two months in summer to fete the Olympic spirit.

Still, exactly how you experience the Games will depend on your budget. Here are some tips on what to expect.

Finding a place to stay

Paris is like a jewel box: dazzling but compact. With around 15 million visitors expected, and just around 85,000 guest rooms, hoteliers are taking full advantage of outsize demand. So are Parisians: Many are planning to flee the city, and are renting out their apartments at top dollar. Average Airbnb prices for Olympic dates have surpassed €500 a night.

At a typical Ibis hotel, a chain similar to Holiday Inn, expect to pay €400 to €700 a night for a fairly basic double room with Wi-Fi and breakfast, compared with €90 to €200 normally. A double room at the more upscale Hotel Ducs de Bourgogne near the Pont Neuf is priced on Booking.com at €1,500 a night, compared with €300 normally in summer.

Consumer associations, including UFC-Que Choisir , a French advocacy group, have denounced price increases that they say risk making the Olympics unaffordable to some.

The French government has said it won’t regulate prices, but will step up inspections of hotels and apartment rentals. “It’s essential that French and international tourists get their money’s worth,” said Olivia Grégoire, the minister in charge of tourism.

With the Games still months away, travelers can find less expensive accommodations that average closer to €450 to €550 a night, mainly at the outer edges of Paris or beyond the city limits, said Christie Hudson, a travel expert for Expedia.com .

But even there, the average cost of a one-night stay in the Île-de-France region that rings Paris is about €700 during the Olympics, compared with €169 last summer, according to the Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau.

That trend could reverse: Some hotels haven’t released all their room inventory, and prices could come down as they seek to fill up their calendars. The downside of waiting is the risk of finding little available at the last minute — not ideal if you’ve already gotten your hands on event tickets or booked air travel.

Airbnb prices for Olympic dates have already cooled a touch, with rates for all listings, including private and shared rooms, now averaging around €542 a night, after surging to €746 in December, according to AirDNA , which tracks Airbnb booking trends. Tens of thousands of new listings have come online around France, and more supply is expected in the Paris region, a factor that should keep prices “affordable,” said Emmanuel Marill, the Europe, Middle East and Africa regional director at Airbnb.

If money is no object, hospitality offers via the Paris Games’ official partner, On Location , guarantee booking through all-inclusive packages that include tickets to select sports events and accommodation in three-, four- and five-star hotels. The options include €8,660 per person in a three-star hotel for eight nights and tickets only to rock climbing competitions, or €21,105 for a deluxe five-day package at the Waldorf Astoria in Versailles that includes the opening ceremony and equestrian events.

Travelers may need to watch out for sudden price jumps by hotels and rental hosts even after a booking is confirmed. Booking.com said it would compensate consumers for the cost difference in such cases. Airbnb said that hosts who tried to increase prices or cancel reservations after booking would face fees and penalties, and that the company would provide most guests with an instant credit to rebook immediately if their stay was canceled within 30 days of arrival.

Scoring tickets to events

If you’ve already gotten reasonably priced tickets, count yourself lucky. Around seven million have been purchased since sales began nearly a year ago on the official Paris 2024 ticketing website . But you can still get into a variety of events, especially team sports at venues outside Paris, including soccer at the 80,700-seat stadium in St.-Denis.

Tickets priced from €90 to €250 also remain for volleyball, handball, archery, badminton and weight lifting, mostly for non-medal competitions.

But blockbuster sports have become all but inaccessible, unless you are willing to splurge. Tickets to events like gymnastics and diving are currently unavailable on the official website. Prices topped €600 before the blocks that had been made available sold out.

Tony Estanguet, president of the Paris 2024 organizing committee, has defended prices and said that tickets are cheaper than those of the 2012 London Olympics.

Bundles of new tickets are released every so often, and organizers urge visitors to check the website frequently or sign up for alerts. More spots will become available on April 17, when the official, and only authorized, resale platform for ticket holders goes online.

At this stage, though, much of the only remaining access to very high-demand events is through On Location’s pricey “hospitality packages,” with options like men’s springboard diving tickets starting at €695 and opening ceremony access ranging from €5,000 to €9,500 per person.

On Location offers a “wide variety” of packages, said Will Whiston, the company’s executive vice president for Olympics and Paralympics, adding that its prices were “in line with and, in some cases, lower than previous Games.”

Getting to, and around, Paris

Round-trip airfares to Paris are already starting to creep up. Nonstop flights on Expedia.com from New York to Paris start at around $1,300 the weekend before the Olympics, up from an average of $1,000 last summer. Generally, travelers can get the best airfare by booking 60 days out. But “prices are expected to increase as the travel dates get closer, so it’s smart to book sooner rather than later,” said Ms. Hudson, the travel expert at Expedia.

If you’re willing to travel light, consider using a discount carrier such as French Bee , which flies round-trip from New York to Paris-Orly Airport for $975, without checked baggage, or Icelandair , requiring a stopover in Reykjavik, starting at about $800 round-trip, also without checked bags. Another option is to fly into an alternate airport, either in France or a nearby country like Belgium, Britain or Germany, and take a train.

Once in Paris, brace yourself for getting around. Olympics organizers want to slash the Games’ carbon footprint, and swaths of the city will be closed to cars. Organizers are placing a premium on walking, cycling and public transportation.

While Metro prices are jumping to €4 per ride, tourists can buy a Paris 2024 pass costing €16 a day, or €70 per week, allowing travel across the Île-de-France region, including to and from Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports.

Paris has added about 55 miles of new cycling lanes to the more than 270 miles already carved out in the city, encouraging visitors to use them. The Velib rental program is being expanded to add 3,000 more bikes to the current 22,000-strong fleet.

Despite all the potential hassles, Mr. Estanguet, the head of the organizing committee, has promised that the Games will be worth the trip. “Let me convince you to come, because this moment is unique,” he said. “You won’t see it again, and you won’t be disappointed.”

Follow New York Times Travel on Instagram and sign up for our weekly Travel Dispatch newsletter to get expert tips on traveling smarter and inspiration for your next vacation. Dreaming up a future getaway or just armchair traveling? Check out our 52 Places to Go in 2024 .

Liz Alderman is the chief European business correspondent, writing about economic, social and policy developments around Europe. More about Liz Alderman

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A tractor blocks the A20 highway near Argenton-sur-Creuse in France with a sign reading ‘Eat French products to save your farmers’

‘Everyone is affected’: Pressure grows on French government to strike deal with farmers

Paris feels impact of continued blockade of capital over low food prices, red-tape and threats to rural life

  • Europe live – latest updates

A t the vast Rungis food market outside the French capital, wholesale fruit and vegetable companies were feeling the effect of French farmer protests , as tractors and hay-bales blocked motorways in what some demonstrators have called the “Siege of Paris”.

“Merchandise hasn’t arrived, there’s definitely an impact,” said Célia, who works at a wholesale fruit and vegetable firm with 12 staff, supplying shops and restaurants in the city. “It’s carrots, potatoes, cabbages, all kinds of fruit and vegetables. Deliveries are very difficult because of the roadblocks. Around 40% of our vegetables haven’t been delivered today and it has been difficult since yesterday for both French and European produce. Everyone is affected and it will continue like that for the coming days.”

French police warned that about 1,000 farmers and 500 tractors were barricading roads across France , and the protests could intensify this week over farmers’ demands for better prices for their produce and more government support.

The new prime minister, Gabriel Attal, told parliament on Tuesday that French farming is “our strength and pride”. He promised France would work to extend an exemption on EU fallow land rules and Paris would set up an emergency fund for struggling wine producers alongside other help for farmers. But the farming crisis looked likely to continue all week.

Teachers and school support staff were to strike across France on Thursday amid calls for better pay and recruitment .

Police walk by tractors as farmers block the A20 highway near Argenton-sur-Creuse

Some farmers on the motorway barricades have spoken of “starving out Paris” in order to get government action on low prices for products, to cut red-tape, and, they argued, to “save the rural way of life”. But Arnaud Rousseau, the leader of the biggest farmers’ union, the FNSEA, said he was against any disruption of food distribution. “Our objective is not to starve French people, but to feed them,” he told the Europe 1 broadcaster.

About 200 southern farmers were on a tractor go-slow snaking through the country and hoping to reach Rungis – Europe’s largest fresh food market – but they had paused in central France on Tuesday morning after police diverted them. The government and French police are seeking to stop any protests from reaching the vast food delivery bays of Rungis, south east of Paris. But the fact that hundreds more farmers and tractors continued to block key motorways on the outskirts of Paris and across France this week was already having an impact on food deliveries.

Amid massive public support for the farmers, concern is growing that if road blockades intensify, it could cause difficulties in the food supply chain this week.

Bakeries across France have been sending free croissants and baguettes to the barricades to support the farmers, but many are concerned that if motorway blockades continue long-term, it could have an impact on lorries delivering flour and ingredients that would affect businesses making bread, sandwiches, cakes and pâtisserie.

Dominique Anract, a baker in western Paris, is president of the French confederation of Boulangerie and Pâtisserie as well as the European Federation of Bakers and the International Union of Bakers. He said: “There are two ways this could really affect us. First, supply. In big cities, bakeries don’t have much space to store ingredients. Perishables – milk, eggs, cream – cannot be stored for long. So without deliveries of items such as flour for bread, or fruit and vegetables for tarts, we would be in difficulty. Artisan bakers use French flour. Most bakers take flour deliveries every week, some every day, and so that’s very worrying. Also, every time there are strikes or protest movements like this, lots of people work from home because they can’t travel to work, so bakery snacks and sandwiches see a big drop in sales. There would be an impact on takings.”

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Farmers take a lunch break on the A20 highway near Saint-Maur

Anract said bakers supported the farmers “because they are our suppliers and we pay them well, we pay a good price for their products … they supply us, they feed France.” But he said at some point, the government must find solutions for the crisis, which would imply discussions at EU level, and would take time.

There were 40km (25 miles) of traffic jams around Paris by late morning on Tuesday, as commuters were advised to carefully plan routes to avoid farmers who had shut key motorways.

From her desk at small family-run transport company south-east of Paris, Tiffany was continuing to process orders for lorry deliveries and collections despite several hay-bale blockades outside Paris. “We support the farmers’ blockades and their protest movement but we’ve got to keep working, we’ve got to keep the country going,” she said. The company’s four staff lived nearby and had been able to get into work and keep driving lorries.

A key issue this week is policing. Whereas protests by environmental protesters in recent months have seen an immediate response by riot police to dislodge them, the farmers have been allowed to stay on motorway barricades as police monitor the situation. The interior minister, Gérald Darmanin, has said he did not want to respond to farmers’ “suffering” by sending in riot police. A test will be the police blocks stationed around Rungis and whether farmers attempt to reach the market this week.

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These ski slip-ups could land you $16,ooo fines in europe.

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Breaking these ski rules could land you with a hefty fine this season.

Ski vacations are already looking pretty pricey this year as resorts hike up costs and fees, but a fine for breaking the myriad rules of the slopes could really push your trip beyond budget.

From wearing ski boots when you're not allowed to forgetting your helmet, these mistakes could land you with hefty fines. Here are all the regulations you need to know to slalom your way through a skiing holiday without incident.

You Can Get Fined For Wearing Ski Boots In Austria

In the tiny Alpine town of Ischgl, incorrect footwear could land you in hot water. Mayor Werner Kurz introduced a €2,000 ($2,150) fine for anyone walking around the resort in their ski boots between 8 pm and 6 am. The measure hopes to prevent accidents and reduce noise disruption on the town's cobbled streets.

Remember that in Austria, it is also considered a serious crime to give someone else your lift pass, a trangression that could leave you with thousands of euros in fines.

France Fines Skiers Smoking On The Slopes

If you trigger an avalanche during your off-piste session in France, you could be fined up to €15,000 ($16,200) and imprisoned for up to a year. Skiers caught in French nature reserves like Plan de Tuèda above Méribel could be also fined €135 ($145). Les pisteurs (security teams who keep the slopes and skiers safe) in France have the right to confiscate your pass for anything from skiing dangerously to ignoring trail markings or not following ski etiquette.

Think twice before you light up in Les Gets.

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If you're thinking of lighting up on the slopes, check the rules first. In 2022, the village of Les Gets introduced a smoking ban with possible fines for trangressors in an effort to clean up the multitude of discarded cigarette butts.

Forgetting Your Ski Helmet In Italy Could Cost You $160

In Italy, fines of €100-€150 ($120-$160) can be imposed on those skiing without ski liability insurance. A ski helmet is also compulsory for children up to 18 years old and those not wearing one risk a fine of €100-€150 ($120-$160).

If you want to ski off-piste in Italy, make sure you avoid nature conservation areas that are designed to protect wildlife and prevent avalanches. Venturing into these zones could be an offence you pay dearly for. You can also be fined and have your lift passes confiscated for skiing or boarding too fast.

Rebecca Ann Hughes

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COMMENTS

  1. Pet Travel from the U.S. to France

    You should use the "non-commercial" health certificate if you or a designated person** is traveling within 5 days before or after your pet(s), and 5 or fewer pets are traveling. Though uncommon, you can also use the "non-commercial" for 6 or more pets traveling to the EU for specific events like competitions, exhibitions, or sporting events.

  2. Taking A Dog To France: Rules & Requirements

    You must have a valid EU pet passport. Your dog will need to be vaccinated against rabies You must wait 21 days from the date of their first rabies vaccination before travelling with your dogs to France or any other EU member state. Flying With Your Dog To France

  3. Guide on taking dogs to France [Pet Passport Requirements 2023]

    February 2, 2023 Taking dogs to France is pretty straightforward. Firstly, you need to ensure you have to correct documentation for a Pet Passport. Dogs, cats and ferrets are eligible for an EU Pet Passport which allows them to travel freely within the EU without enduring a stay in pet quarantine.

  4. Travel: coming to France with your pet

    Travel: coming to France with your pet Imprimer; Envoyer par email; Partager; Mise à jour le 24/08/2022 ... There is a ban on importing certain attack dogs into France. The dogs concerned are Category 1 dogs without a pedigree recognised by the French Ministry of Agriculture belonging to the following breeds: Staffordshire terrier, American ...

  5. Taking a dog to France in 2024: Exactly what you need to know

    1. Book your dog in for a rabies vaccination at your vet practice All dogs that travel to the EU from the UK are required to have an Animal Health Certificate, and the key requirements for an Animal Health Certificate is that your dog must be microchipped and vaccinated against rabies.

  6. Traveling with a Dog to Paris, France: Step-by-Step Guide + Costs

    March 16, 2022 ARF, traveling with a dog to Paris? Hear the barks from a nomadic dog who has not only flown from Los Angeles to Paris regularly since 2016 but also made this dynamic city one of his home bases. Sniff out this comprehensive step-by-step guide on traveling with a dog to Paris below! Posted 4/25/21

  7. Pet travel to France: French pet immigration rules

    Pets are welcome in France, but there are strict rules relating to pet travel. If you plan to take your pet, check the regulations.

  8. Taking Your Dog to France

    Bonjour! I can't bark about international dog travel without barking about France. If you don't already know, France is a dog-friendly country where many dogs live ultra-pampered lives. Since my first international flight was from Los Angeles to Paris, France holds a special place in my little BIG Yorkie heart. ...

  9. Guide to taking your dog to France

    Your dog must arrive in France or the EU within 10 days from the date that the USDA Accredited (U.S.) or CFIA Accredited (Canada) Veterinarian endorses the health certificate. This step is very important! Remember to bring the rabies certificate, copy of flight reservation, and the EU Health Certificate that requires endorsement.

  10. Taking Your Dog on holiday to France [2023 Guide]

    Yes you can take your dog to France. There are a few rules you'll need to adhere to and things you'll need to do and we'll cover them all in this article. But essentially you won't need to holiday without your pet. What are the rules for taking a dog to france?

  11. Pet Travel from the U.S. to France

    Bringing a pet into the U.S. from another country (Import) Taking a pet from one U.S. State/Territory to another U.S. State/Territory (Interstate). Accredited Veterinarians - Pet Travel Information. USDA Endorsement Offices. To use the certificates below, your pets must be more than six months old, and you must provide proof of entry to the ...

  12. Bringing Your Pet to France? 10 Quick Answers to Your FAQs

    To bring your dog to France, they must be over 12 weeks/three months old (the age at which dogs may be vaccinated for rabies), be microchipped, and have been vaccinated for rabies at least 21 days prior to travel. You will need to present either an EU pet passport or a valid Animal Health Certificate along with your pet's vaccination record.

  13. France Pet Quarantine and Travel Regulations

    Entry Requirements Complete the following entry requirements to travel to France with your pet: Four-legged travelers over 12 weeks should be microchipped to enter France. Pets must have a valid rabies vaccination. Visitors must wait 21 days between the last shot of the vaccination and departure.

  14. Dog-Friendly France: Travelling in France with a Dog

    Travelling to France with a Dog Taking your dog to France is relatively easy. The same rules apply for dogs visiting France as for dogs travelling to the rest of the EU (usually microchip, vaccinate for rabies and wait at least 21 days).

  15. Pet Travel to France: Key Changes from January 1, 2021

    By Zoë Smith. Following a EU policy decision, the UK government has announced details of NEW documentation required by British people travelling to France with a pet dog, cat or ferret from January 1, 2021. From this date onwards - the end of the Transition Period - Great Britain will become a 'third country' with respect to the EU Pet ...

  16. Travelling to France With a Dog: The Complete Guide

    Travelling to France with a dog after Brexit has made things a little more complex, but it's totally achievable provided you plan ahead. That's why we've narrowed down what you need to know before travelling to France with a dog from the UK… Book a pet-friendly stay in the French Alps Travel Requirements Microchip

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    All pets must wait at least 21 days after the rabies vaccination before they can travel to France. Please note that the rabies vaccination for pets traveling to the EU must be greater than 21 days old and less than 1 year old at the time of travel. If your pet's vaccination will be over 1 year, then a new vaccine will be needed at least 21 days ...

  18. Flying to France with a Dog from the USA

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    Travelling with pets: dogs, cats and ferrets EU rules make it easy to travel to another EU country (in this case the 27 EU countries + Norway and Northern Ireland) with your dog, cat or ferret. These rules also cover travel to the EU from a country or territory outside the EU.

  20. Travelling To France With Your Dog

    Taking your car is the easiest option. If you drive to France, you can either take your car on a cross-channel ferry or on a Eurotunnel Le Shuttle train. There is usually an extra fee to take your ...

  21. Taking a Dog to France or Europe- Complete Guide

    Taking a dog to France from the UK- the basics There are 3 essential things your dog needs in order to travel with you from the UK to France, Northern Ireland or any other European country: They must be microchipped They must be vaccinated against rabies (more on this below)

  22. Taking your pet dog, cat or ferret abroad: Overview

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  23. What To Know About Traveling Internationally With Your Pets

    Knowing how to travel with a dog internationally (or cat) wisely can be the difference between a rewarding experience and a hassle-plagued trip. ... Air France, Swiss, Turkish Airlines, Lufthansa ...

  24. Can I Take My Dog to France From the UK?

    If you are travelling to France from England in your own car, there are two main options available that allow you to take your dog: either the Eurotunnel or a ferry. Taking the Eurotunnel with a Dog Probably the easiest way to travel to France with a pet (and return to England) is on the Eurotunnel.

  25. Americans Will Need This New Document For 2025 European Travel

    Starting in 2024, 1.4 billion people—including Americans—will need a special travel authorization to enter the Schengen area of Europe. The restriction is part of an international effort to ...

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    Considered one of the best places in the world to retire, the Algarve offers an extraordinary selection of golf courses, a healthy lifestyle, Mediterranean diet, and low cost of living. Best of ...

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    About 200 southern farmers were on a tractor go-slow snaking through the country and hoping to reach Rungis - Europe's largest fresh food market - but they had paused in central France on ...

  29. These Ski Slip-Ups Could Land You $16,ooo Fines In Europe

    France Fines Skiers Smoking On The Slopes. If you trigger an avalanche during your off-piste session in France, you could be fined up to €15,000 ($16,200) and imprisoned for up to a year. Skiers ...