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Coronavirus

What do you want to know more about, what are the current recommendations.

The advice for newly occurring respiratory symptoms is to stay home when feeling unwell, regardless of the cause. There are no rules for quarantine or isolation.

Everyone who is recommended to take the COVID-19 vaccine should do so.

Should I take a COVID-19 test?

You do not need to test for COVID-19 even if you experience respiratory symptoms - unless you are in the risk group. 

If you are in the risk group and get symptoms of covid-19, you should take a self-test. If the self-test is negative but the symptoms persist, repeat the self-test daily for up to four days. Contact a doctor if you test positive or if symptoms worsen.

The doctor will make an overall assessment based on age, as well as other risk factors to decide whether treatment with Paxlovid is appropriate. Treatment should start as early as possible

You do not need to register a positive self-test.

What do I do if I have respiratory symptoms?

  • You should stay home if you feel ill and experience respiratory symptoms. If you have residual symptoms such as runny nose, snot, hoarseness and some coughing, you can go about life as normal.
  • You do not need to test for COVID-19 even if you are experiencing symptoms. If you are in a risk group you should take a test. Read more at FHI.no.
  • If you take a test that shows you are infected with COVID-19, the same advice about staying at home if you feel sick applies.
  • Cough into a handkerchief or into your elbow. Avoid coughing or sneezing directly on others.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid contact with people in risk groups.
  • You should limit or avoid contact with families who have newborn children or infants.
  • Use a face mask if you have to visit places with many people, or if you have to visit someone in the risk group.
  • If you are worried about your own or your child's health, contact a doctor.

Should I take another dose of the COVID-19 vaccine?

Read more about who is recommended to take a new vaccine dose .

Where can I get the Covid-19 vaccine?

The municipalities are responsible for offering the Covid - 19 vaccine. You can check your municipality's website for information.

Where can i find my COVID-19 certificate?

From the 30th of June 2023, the COVID-19 certificate is discontinued. The COVID-19 certificate is now unavailable.

For a printout of vaccines given to you in Norway, log in to Helsenorge's vaccine overview.

What if I need documenation on vaccination or test?

Few countries still require a Covid-19 certificate, although some require some form of vaccination certificate or a test before departure.

You should check which requirements apply for each country on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs' travel information service (regjeringen.no, in Norwegian), or in the Reiseklar app (regjeringen.no, in Norwegian).

Proof of Covid-19 vaccination

If you need proof of vaccination for your destination, go to Vaccination and print out documentation about any vaccines you have been given in Norway.

Documentation on negative test

If you need documentation on not being ill, you have to pay for this yourself, for example at a private practitioner. The GP mainly does not offer a Covid-19 test for documentation.

Vaccination

  • COVID-19 vaccination in Norway

Update May 10, 2024

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Norway Travel Advisory

Travel advisory july 26, 2023, norway - level 1: exercise normal precautions.

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed. 

Exercise normal precautions in Norway.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Norway.  

If you decide to travel to Norway:

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program  ( STEP ) to receive travel alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Norway.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .

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CDC discourages travel to Norway, but most American tourists can't visit anyway

norway travel covid restrictions

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged Americans to "avoid travel" to Norway and Bulgaria on Monday, citing a "very high level of COVID-19," but most Americans aren't allowed to visit Norway anyway.

On Saturday, Norway opened its borders  to citizens from the European Union, the European Economic Area and a handful of other countries

on its purple list – currently New Zealand, Saudi Arabia, Singapore and Taiwan – as well as residents of the United Kingdom and Switzerland. These travelers will not have to quarantine or undergo testing if they have been fully vaccinated or can prove that they had been infected and recovered from the coronavirus within the past six months. 

Most travelers from outside the approved countries – including the U.S. – cannot enter Norway unless they meet certain exemptions , such as visiting a romantic partner or close family members who live in Norway.

► Which EU countries are open to tourists?: A breakdown of EU travel restrictions by country

Learn more: Best travel insurance

► 'Without our loved ones, we are lost': Travelers relieved at US plans to reopen borders

Travelers from approved countries who cannot show proof of vaccination or recovery may face additional entry requirements. If they are 18 and older from red, dark red, purple, gray or third-party countries , they will need to quarantine but can isolate 72 hours after arrival with a negative PCR test. Travelers from green and orange areas do not need to quarantine.

Norway is dropping its pre-arrival testing requirement, but travelers from red, dark red, purple, gray or third-party countries will need to take a test at the border. Norway is dropping its requirement to test on day seven of a trip but recommends children take a second test 72 hours after arrival.  

US travelers to Norway will have to wait

A proposed second phase to the country's reopening plans, which could start in the second half of October , would lift entry restrictions on travelers from the EU's third countries , which do not include the U.S.

The final phase, in which the country would reconsider its remaining entry restrictions, has no proposed start date.

The changes come as Norway's daily COVID-19 cases continue a downward trend after their latest spike. The country has more than 67% of its population fully vaccinated, according to Friday data from Johns Hopkins University . 

Norway Prime Minister Erna Solberg noted that the country's hospital admissions have flattened out and expects large parts of the population to be fully vaccinated in the coming weeks. Norway's National Institute of Public Health now believes there is little risk that the epidemic will get out of control, allowing the country to return to a normal, everyday life, Solberg said in a news release. 

The country was also set to end a number of national coronavirus measures on Saturday, including capacity limits at events.  

Follow USA TODAY reporter Bailey Schulz on Twitter: @bailey_schulz . 

Contributing: Eve Chen, USA TODAY

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Norway Traveler View

Travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine-preventable diseases, stay healthy and safe.

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After Your Trip

Map - Norway

Be aware of current health issues in Norway. Learn how to protect yourself.

Level 1 Practice Usual Precautions

  • Carnival and Mardi Gras June 30, 2021 This notice has been removed. Destination List: Lithuania, Malta, North Macedonia, Norway, Slovakia, Slovenia, United States

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Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

Hepatitis A

Consider hepatitis A vaccination for most travelers. It is recommended for travelers who will be doing higher risk activities, such as visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where a traveler might get infected through food or water. It is recommended for travelers who plan on eating street food.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers younger than 60 years old traveling to Norway. Unvaccinated travelers 60 years and older may get vaccinated before traveling to Norway.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

Cases of measles are on the rise worldwide. Travelers are at risk of measles if they have not been fully vaccinated at least two weeks prior to departure, or have not had measles in the past, and travel internationally to areas where measles is spreading.

All international travelers should be fully vaccinated against measles with the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, including an early dose for infants 6–11 months, according to  CDC’s measles vaccination recommendations for international travel .

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

Norway is free of dog rabies. However, rabies may still be present in wildlife species, particularly bats. CDC recommends rabies vaccination before travel only for people working directly with wildlife. These people may include veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers working with specimens from mammalian species.

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Tick-borne Encephalitis

For travelers moving or traveling to TBE-endemic areas

TBE vaccine is recommended for persons who will have extensive exposure to ticks based on their planned outdoor activities and itinerary.

TBE vaccine may be considered for persons who might engage in outdoor activities in areas ticks are likely to be found. 

Tick-borne Encephalitis - CDC Yellow Book

Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Airborne & droplet.

  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Norway, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the  Department of State Country Information Pages  for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Although Norway is an industrialized country, bug bites here can still spread diseases. Just as you would in the United States, try to avoid bug bites while spending time outside or in wooded areas.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Consider using permethrin-treated clothing and gear if spending a lot of time outside. Do not use permethrin directly on skin.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Norway include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip:

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in the heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if you are driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately.  Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance for things your regular insurance will not cover.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medicines you take.
  • Bring copies of your prescriptions for medicine and for eye glasses and contact lenses.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Norway’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Make sure there are seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Norway, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Norway for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

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Advertisement

Norway lifts coronavirus restrictions after 561 days.

“Now the time has come to return to a normal daily life,” the prime minister, Erna Solberg, said.

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norway travel covid restrictions

By Aina J. Khan

  • Sept. 25, 2021

Norway on Saturday lifted social distancing rules, capacity limits on businesses and other pandemic-era restrictions that have been in place for more than a year.

“It is 561 days since we introduced the toughest measures in Norway in peacetime,” said Erna Solberg, the country’s prime minister, in announcing the moves at a news conference on Friday . “Now the time has come to return to a normal daily life.”

In Norway, new daily cases have dropped by 50 percent over the last two weeks. Sixty-seven percent of the population are fully vaccinated and another 10 percent have had a first dose, according to the Our World in Data project at the University of Oxford .

The changes also allow full capacity at sports and culture venues and restaurants, and the reopening of nightclubs. And the government also said on Friday that it would withdraw at the end of the month its global advisory against nonessential travel abroad.

“We will now go back to assessing countries on an individual basis to determine the need for travel advice,” Ine Eriksen Soreide, the minister of foreign affairs, said in a statement on Friday . “These assessments will incorporate issues relating to the pandemic, the health situation and the security situation in the country in question.”

Entry restrictions will remain in place for some countries, which the government said would be specified before next Friday.

Norway is the latest country in Europe to roll back pandemic-era restrictions. In Sweden, the government confirmed this week that it would proceed with the last stage of its reopening plan for the fully vaccinated, which represents 63 percent of its population.

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norway travel covid restrictions

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Warnings and insurance

Before you travel.

No travel can be guaranteed safe. Read all the advice in this guide and any specific travel advice that applies to you:

  • women travellers
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  • solo and independent travel
  • volunteering and adventure travel

Travel insurance

If you choose to travel, research your destinations and get appropriate travel insurance . Insurance should cover your itinerary, planned activities and expenses in an emergency.

About FCDO travel advice

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Norway Travel Restrictions

Traveller's COVID-19 vaccination status

Travelling from India to Norway

Open for vaccinated visitors

COVID-19 testing

Not required

Not required for vaccinated visitors

Restaurants

Not required in public spaces and public transportation.

Ready to travel?

Find flights to norway, find stays in norway, explore more countries on travel restrictions map, destinations you can travel to now, netherlands, new zealand, philippines, saudi arabia, switzerland, united arab emirates, united kingdom, united states, know when to go.

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Can I travel to Norway from India?

Most visitors from India, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Norway.

Can I travel to Norway if I am vaccinated?

Fully vaccinated visitors from India can enter Norway without restrictions.

Can I travel to Norway without being vaccinated?

Unvaccinated visitors from India can enter Norway without restrictions.

Do I need a COVID test to enter Norway?

Visitors from India are not required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test or antigen result upon entering Norway.

Can I travel to Norway without quarantine?

Travellers from India are not required to quarantine.

Do I need to wear a mask in Norway?

Mask usage in Norway is not required in public spaces and public transportation.

Are the restaurants and bars open in Norway?

Restaurants in Norway are open. Bars in Norway are .

More From Forbes

Norway travel rules: no more covid-19 testing at border.

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Travel to Norway is the easiest it's been in almost two years following a change in Covid-19 rules.

Travelers arriving at the Norwegian border will no longer be required to take a Covid-19 test before entering the country.

The change in Norway’s travel rules was announced by the government as part of a widespread reduction in Covid-19 related measures, which will improve the travel experience at bars, restaurants and events.

Norway’s new travel rules

The immediate removal of the testing requirement means that Norway’s travel restrictions are now the lightest they have been since the pandemic began. However, there are still some restrictions in place.

Everyone traveling to Norway must continue to register using an online system for infection tracking control purposes. This also applies to Norwegian citizens and fully vaccinated individuals.

There is no travel ban in place, meaning pre-pandemic travel rules for entry apply once again. Citizens of many countries including the U.S. are permitted to visit Norway without obtaining a visitor visa in advance.

Travelers without a valid Covid-19 digital certificate (showing full vaccination or recent infection) must show proof of a negative Covid-19 test (PCR or antigen) taken within the 24 hours prior to departure.

Norway loosens its rules

As with many European countries, Norway has seen infection numbers skyrocket in recent weeks as the Omicron variant sweeps the country. However, the number of hospitalized patients has remained relatively stable.

Best Travel Insurance Companies

Best covid-19 travel insurance plans.

“With everything we know today, it is right to remove most infection control measures,” said Norway’s prime minister Jonas Gahr Støre during the press conference.

In addition to the change at the border, Støre announced the previous restrictions on serving alcohol and capacity limits on events both indoors and outdoors would be lifted.

Some recommendations remain in place including the use of masks when social distancing cannot be maintained such as on public transit.

A government press release stated the desire to lift all remaining measures by February 17 . However, Støre closed the press conference in a cautious tone: “I would still like to emphasize that the pandemic is not over. Not in Norway, not in the world. There will still be some advice and rules.”

David Nikel

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COVID-19: travel health notice for all travellers

Norway travel advice

Latest updates: The Health section was updated - travel health information (Public Health Agency of Canada)

Last updated: May 6, 2024 10:24 ET

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Safety and security, entry and exit requirements, laws and culture, natural disasters and climate, norway - take normal security precautions.

Take normal security precautions in Norway

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Petty crime

Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and purse snatching occurs, particularly during the tourism season, from May to September.

Thieves work alone or in groups and may use various techniques to distract you and steal your belongings.

They are especially active in crowded areas, such as:

  • airports, train stations and public transportation facilities, including Oslo’s Central (railway) Station
  • hotel lobbies
  • restaurants, patios and outdoor cafés
  • tourist attractions

Ensure that your belongings, including your passport and other travel documents, are secure at all times.

Violent crime

Violent crime is uncommon, but gang-related violence may occur in certain areas.

While tourists are not specifically targeted, you could find yourself in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Always be vigilant and aware of your surroundings, particularly after dark.

Credit card and ATM fraud occurs. When using debit or credit cards:

  • pay careful attention if other people are handling your cards
  • use ATMs located in public areas or inside a bank or business
  • avoid using card readers with an irregular or unusual feature
  • cover the keypad with one hand when entering your PIN
  • check for any unauthorized transactions on your account statements
  • never save your debit or credit card’s details in unknown laptops or electronic devices

Overseas fraud

There is a threat of terrorism in Europe. Terrorists have carried out attacks in several European cities. Terrorist attacks could occur at any time.

Targets could include:

  • government buildings, including schools
  • places of worship
  • airports and other transportation hubs and networks
  • public areas such as tourist attractions, restaurants, bars, coffee shops, shopping centres, markets, hotels and other sites frequented by foreigners

Always be aware of your surroundings when in public places. Be particularly vigilant during:

  • religious holidays
  • public celebrations
  • major political events, such as elections

Terrorists may use such occasions to mount attacks.

The Government of Norway maintains a public alert system on terrorism. Local authorities publish threat level changes online and through local media.

Threat assessment - Norwegian Police Security Service (in Norwegian)

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur from time to time. Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. They can also lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations and large gatherings are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Monitor local media for information on ongoing demonstrations

Mass gatherings (large-scale events)

Adventure and Arctic tourism

Adventure tourism may lead to serious safety concerns if not well-organized. Weather conditions can change rapidly, even in summer.

In winter, heavy snowfall can make it difficult to reach certain areas. Roads may become impassable. There is also a risk of avalanches, some of which can be fatal.

If you undertake adventure tourism, such as trekking, glacier climbing or skiing, especially in the Arctic regions and remote areas of Norway:

  • never do so alone
  • obtain detailed information on each activity before setting out
  • buy travel insurance that includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation
  • ensure that your physical condition is good enough to meet the challenges of your activity
  • don’t venture off marked trails
  • ensure that you’re properly equipped
  • carry a cellphone or a GPS that can generate your position in case of emergency
  • ensure that you’re well informed about weather and other conditions that may pose a hazard
  • inform a family member or friend of your itinerary

Svalbard archipelago

The presence of polar bears in the Svalbard archipelago may put your safety at high risk.

Do not venture outside of the settlements without a guide and proper equipment.

Useful links

  • Need to know about Norwegian outdoors - Norwegian Trekking Association
  • Safety first - Visit Norway
  • Weather warnings - Norwegian Meteorological Institute
  • Avalanches warnings - Norwegian Avalanche Warning Service
  • Safety in Svalbard - Visit Svalbard

Cruise ship travel

Unpredictable weather in Norway may disrupt cruise ship travel and lead to rough seas, cancellation, delays and itinerary changes without notice. Rescue operations may also be very limited in remote areas, particularly in Nordic regions and Svalbard.

If you decide to take a cruise in Norway:

  • choose a well-established and reputable cruise company
  • ensure that your travel insurance covers cruise ship travel and includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation

Advice for Cruise Travellers

Road safety

Road conditions and road safety are good.

Some roads may be narrow, hazardous and impassable in winter, particularly in northern areas.

Road accidents involving wildlife are common.

Be particularly vigilant if driving at night.

Public transportation

Public transportation services are efficient and reliable.

Trains and buses

Norway has an extensive railway network that connects main cities. Oslo also has a metro.

Most cities have good public bus systems. Long-distance bus lines are also available.

Taxis are widely available but may be expensive.

Use only officially marked taxis, particularly in Oslo.

There are daily ferry connections with Denmark, Sweden and Germany.

Getting around Norway - Visit Norway

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

Information about foreign domestic airlines

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Norwegian authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with the  Foreign Representatives in Canada .

  • Schengen area

Norway is a Schengen area country. Canadian citizens do not need a visa for travel to countries within the Schengen area. However, visa-free travel only applies to stays of up to 90 days in any 180-day period. Stays are cumulative and include visits to any Schengen area country.

If you plan to stay in the Schengen area for a longer period of time, you will need a visa. You must contact the high commission or embassy of the country or countries you are travelling to and obtain the appropriate visa(s) prior to travel.

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada

Temporary border controls

The Norwegian government has reintroduced internal border controls at certain ports of entry.

You may need to pass through immigration controls when entering Norway, even if arriving from another Schengen area country.

Vehicles with Russian license plates

Since October 2023, Norway has enforced an entry ban on vehicles registered in Russia with nine or fewer seats. This restriction is currently in place at the border and mirrors existing European Union sanctions against the Russian Federation.

Vehicles registered in Russia carrying Russian license plates will be refused entry into Norway.

Norway is tightening its restrictive measures against Russia  – Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

While Svalbard is a Norwegian territory, it’s not part of the Schengen area.

You must have a valid passport to enter Svalbard and meet Schengen area entry regulations when returning to Norway’s mainland.

Entry and residence  - Governor of Svalbard

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid for at least 3 months beyond the date you expect to leave the Schengen area.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Passport with “X” gender identifier

While the Government of Canada issues passports with an “X” gender identifier, it cannot guarantee your entry or transit through other countries. You might face entry restrictions in countries that do not recognize the “X” gender identifier. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada
  • Canadian passports

Tourist visa: not required for stays up to 90 days in any 180-day period Business visa: not required Work visa: required Student visa: not required for stays up to 90 days in any 180-day period

Children and travel

Learn more about travelling with children .

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Relevant Travel Health Notices

  • Global Measles Notice - 13 March, 2024
  • COVID-19 and International Travel - 13 March, 2024

This section contains information on possible health risks and restrictions regularly found or ongoing in the destination. Follow this advice to lower your risk of becoming ill while travelling. Not all risks are listed below.

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably 6 weeks before you travel to get personalized health advice and recommendations.

Routine vaccines

Be sure that your  routine vaccinations , as per your province or territory , are up-to-date before travelling, regardless of your destination.

Some of these vaccinations include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

You may be at risk for preventable diseases while travelling in this destination. Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines may be right for you, based on your destination and itinerary. 

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is not required to enter this country.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is not recommended.

* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

About Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada

Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a risk in some areas of this destination. It is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). It is spread to humans by the bite of infected ticks or occasionally when unpasteurized milk products are consumed.

Travellers to areas where TBE is found may be at higher risk  during April to November, and the risk is highest for people who hike or camp in forested areas.

Protect yourself from tick bites . The vaccine is not available in Canada. It may be available in the destination you are travelling to.

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

  Hepatitis B is a risk in every destination. It is a viral liver disease that is easily transmitted from one person to another through exposure to blood and body fluids containing the hepatitis B virus.  Travellers who may be exposed to blood or other bodily fluids (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) are at higher risk of getting hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all travellers. Prevent hepatitis B infection by practicing safe sex, only using new and sterile drug equipment, and only getting tattoos and piercings in settings that follow public health regulations and standards.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling. Evidence shows that vaccines are very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. While vaccination provides better protection against serious illness, you may still be at risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Anyone who has not completed a vaccine series is at increased risk of being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and is at greater risk for severe disease when travelling internationally.

Before travelling, verify your destination’s COVID-19 vaccination entry/exit requirements. Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are adequately protected against COVID-19.

 The best way to protect yourself from seasonal influenza (flu) is to get vaccinated every year. Get the flu shot at least 2 weeks before travelling.  

 The flu occurs worldwide. 

  •  In the Northern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs from November to   April.
  •  In the Southern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs between April and   October.
  •  In the tropics, there is flu activity year round. 

The flu vaccine available in one hemisphere may only offer partial protection against the flu in the other hemisphere.

The flu virus spreads from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Clean your hands often and wear a mask if you have a fever or respiratory symptoms.

In this destination, rabies  may be present in some wildlife species, including bats. Rabies is a deadly disease that spreads to humans primarily through bites or scratches from an infected animal. 

If you are bitten or scratched by an animal while travelling, immediately wash the wound with soap and clean water and see a health care professional. 

Before travel, discuss rabies vaccination with a health care professional. It may be recommended for travellers who will be working directly with wildlife. 

Safe food and water precautions

Many illnesses can be caused by eating food or drinking beverages contaminated by bacteria, parasites, toxins, or viruses, or by swimming or bathing in contaminated water.

  • Learn more about food and water precautions to take to avoid getting sick by visiting our eat and drink safely abroad page. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!
  • Avoid getting water into your eyes, mouth or nose when swimming or participating in activities in freshwater (streams, canals, lakes), particularly after flooding or heavy rain. Water may look clean but could still be polluted or contaminated.
  • Avoid inhaling or swallowing water while bathing, showering, or swimming in pools or hot tubs. 

Insect bite prevention

Many diseases are spread by the bites of infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. When travelling to areas where infected insects may be present:

  • Use insect repellent (bug spray) on exposed skin
  • Cover up with light-coloured, loose clothes made of tightly woven materials such as nylon or polyester
  • Minimize exposure to insects
  • Use mosquito netting when sleeping outdoors or in buildings that are not fully enclosed

To learn more about how you can reduce your risk of infection and disease caused by bites, both at home and abroad, visit our insect bite prevention page.

Find out what types of insects are present where you’re travelling, when they’re most active, and the symptoms of the diseases they spread.

Animal precautions

Some infections, such as rabies and influenza, can be shared between humans and animals. Certain types of activities may increase your chance of contact with animals, such as travelling in rural or forested areas, camping, hiking, and visiting wet markets (places where live animals are slaughtered and sold) or caves.

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, livestock (pigs, cows), monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats, and to avoid eating undercooked wild game.

Closely supervise children, as they are more likely to come in contact with animals.

Person-to-person infections

Stay home if you’re sick and practise proper cough and sneeze etiquette , which includes coughing or sneezing into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand. Reduce your risk of colds, the flu and other illnesses by:

  •   washing your hands often
  • avoiding or limiting the amount of time spent in closed spaces, crowded places, or at large-scale events (concerts, sporting events, rallies)
  • avoiding close physical contact with people who may be showing symptoms of illness 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) , HIV , and mpox are spread through blood and bodily fluids; use condoms, practise safe sex, and limit your number of sexual partners. Check with your local public health authority pre-travel to determine your eligibility for mpox vaccine.  

Medical services and facilities

Health care is excellent. Services are available throughout the country. However, access to emergency medical assistance may be very limited in Arctic and remote regions.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a   travel health kit , especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

You must abide by local laws.

Learn about what you should do and how we can help if you are arrested or detained abroad .

Transfer to a Canadian prison

Canada and Norway are signatories to the Convention on the Transfer of Sentenced Persons. This enables a Canadian imprisoned in Norway to request a transfer to a Canadian prison to complete a sentence. The transfer requires the agreement of both Canadian and Norway authorities.

This process can take a long time, and there is no guarantee that the transfer will be approved by either or both sides.

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect prison sentences, heavy fines and deportation.

Drugs, alcohol and travel

Dual citizenship

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in Norway.

If you are a Canadian citizen, but also a citizen of Norway, our ability to offer you consular services may be limited while you're there. You may also be subject to different entry/exit requirements .

Travellers with dual citizenship

International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is an international treaty. It can help parents with the return of children who have been removed to or retained in certain countries in violation of custody rights. The convention applies between Canada and Norway.

If your child was wrongfully taken to, or is being held in Norway, and if the applicable conditions are met, you may apply for the return of your child to the Norwegian court.

If you are in this situation:

  • act as quickly as you can
  • contact the Central Authority for your province or territory of residence for information on starting an application under The Hague Convention
  • consult a lawyer in Canada and in Norway to explore all the legal options for the return of your child
  • report the situation to the nearest Canadian government office abroad or to the Vulnerable Children’s Consular Unit at Global Affairs Canada by calling the Emergency Watch and Response Centre

If your child was removed from a country other than Canada, consult a lawyer to determine if The Hague Convention applies.

Be aware that Canadian consular officials cannot interfere in private legal matters or in another country’s judicial affairs.

  • List of Canadian Central Authorities for the Hague Convention
  • International Child Abduction: A Guidebook for Left-Behind Parents
  • Travelling with children
  • The Hague Convention - Hague Conference on Private International Law
  • Canadian embassies and consulates by destination
  • Emergency Watch and Response Centre

You can drive in Norway with your Canadian driver’s licence for up to 3 months.

You should carry an international driving permit.

You must keep headlights on at all times.

Drinking and driving

Penalties for drinking and driving are severe.

The legal blood alcohol limit is 0.02%. Roadside checks for alcohol are frequent, and submission to a breathalyzer test is mandatory.

Congestion charges and low-emission zones

Certain cities, including Oslo, have put in place toll charges and low-emission zones to reduce traffic and air pollution.

Make sure you are aware of the regulation in effect.

  • Driving in Norway - European Commission
  • Norwegian traffic rules - The Norwegian Public Roads Administration
  • International Driving Permit

The currency of Norway is the Norwegian krone (NOK).

If you are carrying NOK 25,000 or more, or the equivalent in other currencies, you must make a declaration to customs when you enter or leave Norway. This includes sums in:

  • money orders
  • traveller’s cheques
  • any other convertible assets

Norway is prone to severe weather. The climate can be unpredictable at any time of year.

Monitor weather reports closely.

Weather forecasts and warnings - Norwegian Meteorological Institute

Flooding and landslides

Heavy rains, particularly in spring and summer, can cause severe flooding and landslides. Roads may become impassable and infrastructure damaged.

  • Exercise caution, particularly in areas around major rivers and coastline
  • Stay informed of the latest regional weather forecasts
  • Follow the advice of local authorities, including evacuation orders

Forest fires may occur, particularly during the summer months.

The air quality in areas near active fires may deteriorate due to heavy smoke.

In case of a major fire:

  • stay away from affected areas, particularly if you suffer from respiratory ailments
  • monitor local media for up-to-date information on the situation
  • follow the advice of local authorities

There is a risk of avalanches in mountainous regions, especially following heavy snowfalls. Some of them can be fatal.

  • Monitor the latest warnings
  • Download and consult the Varsom app

Avalanches warnings - Norwegian Avalanche Warning Service (Varsom)

Local services

In case of emergency, dial:

  • police: 112
  • medical assistance: 113
  • firefighters: 110

Consular assistance

Please call before visiting the consulate.

For emergency consular assistance, call the Embassy of Canada to Norway, in Oslo, and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.

The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

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Exercise normal safety precautions in Norway.

Norway Map April 2023

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Local emergency contacts

Fire and rescue services, medical emergencies, advice levels.

  • Norway's current terrorist threat level is 3-Moderate. Terrorists have attacked cities in Europe, and targets have included public places that foreigners visit. 
  • Norway has a low level of crime. However, sexual assaults against foreigners and violent, gang-related crimes have occurred. 
  • There's a risk of petty crime, particularly in and around Oslo. The risk rises during the peak tourist season from May to September. Thieves often work together and use tricks to distract travellers. Be careful in airports, train stations, Oslo's main shopping streets, hotel lobbies and restaurants.
  • Avalanches and rockslides can happen in some mountain areas. Extreme weather, floods and landslides can also occur. Check advice on weather and safety conditions before skiing or mountaineering.
  • The northernmost parts of Norway are in the Arctic Circle. Be careful in these areas. Polar bears have killed travellers in Svalbard. Follow instructions from local authorities. If you're travelling by ship, check the onboard medical care.

Full travel advice: Safety

  • Hospitals in cities offer a high standard of care. Many medical staff speak English. However, services are limited in rural and remote areas.
  • You may need to be evacuated if you need treatment in remote areas. Make sure you have appropriate travel insurance.
  • Australia has a reciprocal healthcare agreement with Norway. You can access immediate emergency medical services. You still need private travel health insurance.

Full travel advice: Health

  • Penalties for drug offences include heavy fines and imprisonment.
  • If you assault someone, however minor, you may face jail.
  • The blood alcohol limit for drivers is 0.02%. There are frequent roadside checks for drink driving.
  • Norway allows dual citizenship. If you hold Norwegian citizenship, you may be required to do national service if you're aged between 19 and 44.
  • Seek appropriate registration for drones and  check if drone flying is permitted  in the area before taking off. Officials have seized drones, and tourists have been arrested for operating drones.

Full travel advice: Local laws

  • Norway is part of the  Schengen area . You may be able to enter Norway without a tourist visa. In other situations, you'll need a visa. Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. Contact the nearest embassy or consulate of Norway for the latest details.

The Norwegian territory of Svalbard isn't part of the Schengen area.

  • Norway's official currency is the Norwegian Kroner (NOK). 

Full travel advice: Travel

Local contacts

  • The  Consular Services Charter  tells you what the Australian government can and can't do to help when you're overseas.
  • Australia doesn't have an embassy in Norway. You can seek emergency consular help from the  Canadian Embassy in Oslo .
  • For regular consular help, contact the  Australian Embassy in Copenhagen, Denmark .
  • Follow the Embassy's social media accounts to stay up to date with local information.

Full travel advice: Local contacts

Full advice

There's an ongoing threat of terrorism in Europe.

Terrorists have attacked some European cities in recent years. Targets have included:

  • public transport
  • other transport hubs
  • cultural venues and markets
  • public places frequented by locals and foreigners.

Norway's terror threat is Level 3: Moderate.

In June 2022, a gunman shot at people in 3 venues in Oslo. 3 people were killed, and several others were injured.

In August 2019, a gunman attempted an attack on the Al-Noor Islamic Centre in Baerum, outside Oslo. One person was injured.

To reduce your risk of terrorism:

  • be alert to possible threats, especially in public places
  • report suspect actions or items to police
  • monitor the media for threats
  • take official warnings seriously
  • follow advice from local authorities.

If there's an attack, leave the area as soon as it's safe. Avoid the affected area in case of secondary attacks.

Terrorism is a threat worldwide.

More information:

  • Norwegian Police Security Service Threat Assessment (Norwegian)

Violent crime

Serious crime is rare.

There have been some  sexual assaults  against foreigners. 

Violent crime with weapons has occurred in areas where criminal gangs operate, such as parts of eastern Oslo.

Petty crime

Petty crimes, such as pickpocketing, cons and bag-snatching, are increasingly common. The risk rises during the peak tourist season from May to September, particularly in Oslo.

Thieves often work together and use various tricks to distract travellers.

To protect yourself from crime:

  • watch your belongings on buses and taxis, especially at night
  • don't go out alone after dark or to isolated places, especially on foot
  • always keep your vehicle and accommodation locked
  • be alert to suspicious behaviour.

Cyber security

You may be at risk of cyber-based threats during overseas travel to any country. Digital identity theft is a growing concern. Your devices and personal data can be compromised, especially if you're connecting to Wi-Fi, using or connecting to shared or public computers, or to Bluetooth.

Social media can also be risky in destinations where there are social or political tensions or laws that may seem unreasonable by Australian standards. Travellers have been arrested for things they have said on social media. Don't comment on local or political events on your social media.

More information: 

  • Cyber security when travelling overseas

Civil unrest and political tension

Civil unrest is rare.

Check the media and avoid possible unrest.

If there's a protest near you, follow the advice of local authorities.

Public protests and events that draw large groups of people can turn violent.

Demonstrations and civil unrest

Tours and Adventure travel

There are many adventure activities in Norway. These include mountaineering, trekking, skiing and glacier climbing.

Check you have everything you need for these activities, including the right equipment.

Ensure you're fit enough to do these activities.

To stay safe:

  • follow local advice
  • stay on marked runs and paths
  • only ski in recommended areas
  • check weather forecasts
  • always let people know where you're going

The weather can be unpredictable, even during the summer months. Avalanches and accidents on glaciers and boats have also killed travellers.

Check your travel insurance covers these activities. Include coverage for helicopter rescue and medical evacuation.

If you're travelling to Svalbard, follow local safety advice.

Polar bears have killed and injured travellers in Svalbard. 

  • Governor of Svalbard

Tour operators

Tour operators don't always follow safety and maintenance standards.

If you plan to do a tour or adventure activity:

  • check if your travel insurance policy covers it
  • ask about and insist on minimum safety requirements
  • always use available safety gear, such as life jackets or seatbelts

If proper safety equipment isn't available, use another provider.

Arctic travel

The northernmost parts of Norway are above the Arctic Circle. The Arctic is a vast region. Take care in these areas.

If you're planning to visit:

  • work out how far you'll be from search and rescue, evacuation and medical facilities
  • make contingency plans
  • be ready to change your plans if you need to
  • follow the advice from local authorities

If you're travelling by ship:

  • check the onboard medical care
  • ask cruise operators about medical arrangements
  • discuss any pre-existing medical conditions.

Search and rescue services may take a long time to arrive. They could be many hundreds of kilometres away. Stranded vessels may wait several days for help, particularly in bad weather.

We may not be able to give you full or prompt consular assistance in remote areas. 

To reduce your risks, have travel insurance or funds to cover:

  • the cost of search and rescue
  • any medical treatment 
  • your return home or to another city or country.

More information

  • Going on a cruise
  • Travel to Antarctica and the Arctic

Climate and natural disasters

Norway experiences natural disasters and severe weather , such as:

  • avalanches and rockslides in some mountain areas

Check advice on weather and safety conditions before skiing or mountaineering.

If there's a natural disaster:

  • Download the Varsom app which provides advice on risks across Norway
  • follow the advice of local authorities
  • get updates from the Norwegian Government

Register with the Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System to receive alerts on major disasters.

Travel insurance

Get comprehensive  travel insurance  before you leave.

Your policy needs to cover all overseas medical costs, including medical evacuation. The Australian Government won't pay for these costs.

If you can't afford travel insurance, you can't afford to travel. This applies to everyone, no matter how healthy and fit you are.

If you're not insured, you may have to pay thousands of dollars up-front for medical care.

  • what activities and care your policy covers
  • that your insurance covers you for the whole time you'll be away. 

Physical and mental health

Consider your physical and mental health before you travel, especially if you have an existing medical condition. 

See your doctor or travel clinic to:

  • have a basic health check-up
  • ask if your travel plans may affect your health 
  • plan any vaccinations you need

Do this at least 8 weeks before you leave.

If you have immediate concerns for your welfare or the welfare of another Australian, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on +61 2 6261 3305 or contact your  nearest Australian Embassy, High Commission or Consulate  to discuss counselling hotlines and services available in your location.

  • General health advice
  • Healthy holiday tips  (Healthdirect Australia)

Medications

Not all medications available over the counter or by prescription in Australia are available in other countries. Some may even be considered illegal or a controlled substance, even if prescribed by an Australian doctor.

If you plan to bring medication,  check if it's legal in Norway . Take enough legal medicine for your trip.

For advice on restrictions on imports, visit the  Norwegian Customs website .

Carry a copy of your prescription or a letter from your doctor stating:

  • what the medication is
  • your required dosage
  • that it's for personal use.

Health risks

Health risks in Norway are broadly similar to those in Australia.

Medical care

Hospitals in cities offer a high standard of care. Many medical staff speak English.

Australia has a reciprocal healthcare agreement with Norway. You can access immediate emergency medical services.

The agreement won't cover ongoing treatment of existing health conditions. You still need private travel health insurance.

Services are limited in rural and remote areas, including Svalbard.

If you need treatment in the remote area of northern Norway or Svalbard, medical teams may evacuate you for medical care. This will take time. Medical evacuation can be very expensive and is not covered by the reciprocal health agreement.

  • Medicare and reciprocal healthcare agreements

Y You're subject to all local laws and penalties, including those that may appear harsh by Australian standards. Research local laws before travelling.

If you're arrested or jailed, the Australian Government will do what it can to help you under our  Consular Services Charter . But we can't get you out of trouble or out of jail.

If you break the law in Norway, you may be banned from the  Schengen area  for up to 10 years or permanently.

  • Arrested or jailed

Penalties for drug offences, even for possession of small amounts of recreational drugs or some prescription medications, include:

  • heavy fines
  • imprisonment
  • being removed from the Schengen area.

You must be appropriately  registered  in an EU country to operate a drone in Norway. Civil Aviation Authority Norway provides guidance on registering and operating  drones  in Norway. 

Drones are strictly controlled in the polar regions, including air, ground and water drones.  

Penalties for operating a drone without appropriate approvals or in restricted locations can include: 

  • heavy fines 
  • confiscation of the drone
  • you may face jail or deportation
  • you may be banned from the Schengen area

Always carry an ID, such as your driver's licence or a copy of your passport.

If you assault someone in any way, you may be jailed.

Alcohol laws are very strict, and penalties for driving under the influence are severe. The legal limit is 0.02% blood alcohol and applies to the driver of any motorised vehicle. There are frequent roadside drink driving checks.

If you speed or drive under the influence:

  • penalties are severe
  • you may be banned from the Schengen area.

Australian laws

Some Australian criminal laws still apply when you're overseas. If you break these laws, you may face prosecution in Australia.

Staying within the law and respecting customs

Dual citizenship

Norway allows dual citizenship. As a Norwegian citizen, you may have to do national service if you're aged between 19 and 44. This applies to all men and women born after 1 January 1997.

Dual nationals

Visas and border measures

Every country or territory decides who can enter or leave through its borders. For specific information about the evidence you'll need to enter a foreign destination, check with the nearest embassy, consulate or immigration department of the destination you're entering. 

Visa conditions

Norway is part of the  Schengen area , along with many other European countries. You may be able to enter Norway without a tourist visa. In other situations, you'll need a visa.

Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. Contact the nearest  embassy or consulate of Norway  for details about visas, currency, customs and quarantine rules.

Travel via Svalbard

If you're travelling to Svalbard, you'll need a valid passport to enter.

You must meet  Schengen area  entry requirements when returning to Norway's mainland.

Medical facilities in Svalbard are limited. You may require medical evacuation for treatment. 

Other formalities

Norway has border controls at:

  • ferry crossings from Sweden, Denmark and Germany
  • at the land border between Norway and Sweden, Finland and Russia.

Always carry your passport to enter and exit, even if you're travelling within the Schengen area.

Border controls between Norway and Russia have been tightened. You should only approach the border along the road leading to the  Storskog border  crossing station.

Some countries won't let you enter unless your passport is valid for 6 months after you plan to leave that country. This can apply even if you're transiting or stopping over.

Some foreign governments and airlines can be inconsistent in applying the rule. Travellers can receive conflicting advice from different sources.

You can end up stranded if your passport is not valid for more than 6 months.

The Australian Government does not set these rules. Check your passport's expiry date before you travel. If you're not sure it'll be valid long enough, consider getting  a new passport .

Lost or stolen passport

Your passport is a valuable document. It's attractive to people who may try to use your identity to commit crimes.

Some people may try to trick you into giving them your passport. Always keep it in a safe place.

If your passport is lost or stolen, tell the Australian Government as soon as possible:

  • In Australia, contact the  Australian Passport Information Service .
  • If you're overseas, contact the nearest  Australian embassy or consulate

Border crossings

Always carry your passport when crossing borders, including within the Schengen area.

Get an entry stamp in your passport from border control staff when you first enter the  Schengen area .

Passport with 'X' gender identifier

Although Australian passports comply with international standards for sex and gender, we can't guarantee that a passport showing an 'X' in the sex field will be accepted for entry or transit by another country. Contact the nearest  embassy, high commission or consulate of your destination  before you arrive at the border to confirm if authorities will accept passports with 'X' gender markers.

  • LGBTQIA+ travellers

Norway's official currency is the Norwegian Kroner (NOK). Norway won't accept the Euro in most situations.

You can bring up to the equivalent of 25,000 NOK in cash into Norway.

You need to pay a customs toll and a fine if you arrive with more than 25,000 NOK.

Directorate of Norwegian Customs

Access to money

Norway accepts some foreign debit and credit cards in some outlets. These may incur a surcharge fee.

Credit card transactions usually need a credit card with a microchip and PIN, not a signature.

There are limited ATMs in most rural areas in Norway. 

Local travel

Driving permit.

Australian driving licences are valid in Norway for up to 3 months. However, some car rental companies may require customers to present an International Driving Permit (IDP) regardless.

You can check if your licence will be accepted in Norway, as well as the minimum driving age, here:  Driving licence holders | Statens vegvesen

If you need an IDP, get this before you leave Australia. An IDP does not replace the requirement for a regular driver's licence.

If your driving licence is not written in Latin letters or doesn't include your licence number, a photograph or an issuing date, you'll need an IDP to drive in Norway.

Road travel

Speed limits are low. Roads can be dangerous in winter due to ice. The weather can change quickly, and snow can block rural roads. Plan ahead.

Rural roads are usually 2 lanes and can be narrow and winding in mountainous regions. Take particular care when driving outside urban areas. Check signs for animal crossings, such as moose or deer crossings.

The northern lights can distract drivers, making them lose control or stop without warning, creating a hazard for other road users.

By law, when driving, headlights must be on at all times, and it's illegal to use your mobile phone. Authorities impose heavy fines for speeding and strictly enforce drink driving laws.

Norway has tyre requirements that change with the seasons. Ensure your tyres are appropriate for the weather and road surface conditions. Check official information here:  Tyre requirements | Statens vegvesen

Road rules and conditions are available at the  Norwegian Public Road Administration .

  •   Driving or riding

Motorcycles

Check that your travel insurance policy covers you when riding a motorcycle.

Always wear a helmet.

DFAT doesn't provide information on the safety of individual commercial airlines or flight paths.

Check  Norway's air safety profile  with the Aviation Safety Network.

Emergencies

Depending on what you need, contact your:

  • family and friends
  • travel agent
  • insurance provider

If not life-threatening, out-of-hours medical advice is available on +47 116117.

Always get a police report when reporting a crime.

Your insurer should have a 24-hour emergency number.

Keep in mind that there might not be mobile phone coverage where you are heading. Emergency telephones can be found on some mountain trails and in tunnels.

Consular contacts

Read the Consular Services Charter for what the Australian Government can and can't do to help you overseas.

Australia doesn't have an embassy or consulate in Norway.

You can seek emergency consular help from the Canadian Embassy in Oslo:

Canadian Embassy, Oslo

Wergelandsveien 7, 4th floor 0244 Oslo Norway Phone: (+47) 22 99 53 00 Email:  [email protected]

You can also seek consular help from the Australian Embassy in Copenhagen, Denmark:

Australian Embassy, Copenhagen

Dampfaergevej 26, 2nd floor 2100 Copenhagen Ø Denmark Phone: +45 7026 3676 Email: [email protected]   Website: denmark.embassy.gov.au Facebook: Australia in Denmark, Norway and Iceland X: @AusEmbDK

Check the Embassy website for details about opening hours and any temporary closures.

24-hour Consular Emergency Centre

In a consular emergency, if you can't contact an Embassy, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on:

  • +61 2 6261 3305 from overseas
  • 1300 555 135 in Australia

""

Travelling to Norway?

Sign up to get the latest travel advice updates..

Be the first to know official government advice when travelling.

Norway Travel Restrictions

Traveller's COVID-19 vaccination status

Travelling from Australia to Norway

Open for vaccinated visitors

COVID-19 testing

Not required

Not required for vaccinated visitors

Restaurants

Not required in public spaces and public transportation.

Ready to travel?

Find flights to norway, find stays in norway, explore more countries on travel restrictions map, destinations you can travel to now, netherlands, new zealand, philippines, south korea, united arab emirates, united kingdom, united states, know when to go.

Sign up for email alerts as countries begin to open - choose the destinations you're interested in so you're in the know.

Can I travel to Norway from Australia?

Most visitors from Australia, regardless of vaccination status, can enter Norway.

Can I travel to Norway if I am vaccinated?

Fully vaccinated visitors from Australia can enter Norway without restrictions.

Can I travel to Norway without being vaccinated?

Unvaccinated visitors from Australia can enter Norway without restrictions.

Do I need a COVID test to enter Norway?

Visitors from Australia are not required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test or antigen result upon entering Norway.

Can I travel to Norway without quarantine?

Travellers from Australia are not required to quarantine.

Do I need to wear a mask in Norway?

Mask usage in Norway is not required in public spaces and public transportation.

Are the restaurants and bars open in Norway?

Restaurants in Norway are open. Bars in Norway are .

norway travel covid restrictions

China announces 15-day visa-free stay in select provinces for cruise travelers to boost tourism

  • New regulations, which came into effect Wednesday, allow tour groups to enter through one of 13 coastal cruise ports in China and stay for up to 15 days in select provinces in the country.
  • The policy will help accelerate the development of China's cruise industry and it's efforts to open back to the world following it's period of strict pandemic restrictions, a government agency said.

Travelers entering China via international cruises can stay in select provinces in the country for up to 15 days without a visa, the  government said Wednesday , as Beijing attempts to boost its cruise and tourism industry.

The regulations require foreigners to enter through one of 13 coastal cruise ports in the country, according to a statement from China's National Immigration Administration (NIA). 

Visitors must travel as part of a tour group of at least two people organized by a Chinese travel agency and depart the country on the same cruise. Tour groups can travel to Beijing or other coastal provinces. 

"The full implementation of the visa-free entry policy for foreign tourists taking cruises is an important pillar to accelerate the development of China's cruise economy, and an important measure to promote China's institutional opening," NIA said in a statement. 

China's cruise business made major strides this year, with the country's first domestically-built cruise liner, the Adora Magic City, making its first voyage on Jan. 1, according to  state-run media . 

On Wednesday, seven cruise ports were also added as eligible entry points under China's existing visa-free transit policy, on top of the previous 31. 

Visa-free transit allows citizens from certain countries to stay in China without a visa for up to 144 hours while transiting to another country. In November,   Norway was added  to the countries eligible for visa-free transit to China, bringing the total to 54.

The latest visa-free travel policy reflects China's "determination and attitude" towards "opening up to the world" and is a step towards prompting better exchange between China and foreign countries, NIA said. 

China has been striving to woo back tourists since it reopened its borders last year and began restoring international flight routes, ending three years of strict COVID-19 policies.

In December, the  country granted a temporary visa exemption for travel up to 15 days to citizens of France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and Malaysia. Beijing also  enacted a mutual visa exemption agreement  with Singapore in February. The scheme is valid till November this year.

Companies have also also been trying to improve foreign tourists' travel experience. Alibaba-affiliate Ant Group recently allowed visitors  to China to spend up to $2,000 a year through its Alipay mobile app without having to register their ID with the company.  

The efforts come as the country has failed to boost foreign traveler count back to pre-pandemic levels as per NIA data, even as domestic tourism in China has rebounded . 

Data shows that 13 million foreigners crossed into or out of China in the first three months of this year, down over 40% from the same period in 2019.

— CNBC's Vivien Soo contributed to this report.

Adora Magic City, the first made-in-China large cruise ship, waits for its first commercial passengers on the dockyard in Shanghai on January 1, 2024. 

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Opinion | Cory Franklin: Was Sweden’s COVID-19 approach…

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Opinion | cory franklin: was sweden’s covid-19 approach superior to that of the u.s., the most important outcome difference between the u.s. and sweden was in children’s education.

Blue scrubs and a stethoscope hanging on a hook.

The Swedish tack relied on personal responsibility and voluntary measures rather than government coercion and restrictions. This attitude, ultimately vindicated, was attacked at the time by health officials and the press in Western Europe and North America.

How did America and Sweden fare comparatively?

COVID-19-related cases

COVID-19 outcomes were similar. According to the statistics site Worldometer, in terms of officially reported cases since the beginning of the pandemic, Sweden had roughly 27 cases out of 100 people, the U.S. had 34 cases out of 100. This was only reported cases, and the best estimate is that considering all cases, whether reported or not, both countries had between 80 and 90 cases per 100, so the difference in infection rates disappears. Neither a lockdown-intensive nor a permissive strategy minimized the ultimate number of COVID-19 cases.

COVID-19-related mortality

The numbers once again lean slightly toward Sweden, but it is likely the health of Swedish citizens versus that of the U.S. was responsible, instead of the superiority of the Swedish strategy. In the U.S. overall, there were 3.7 COVID-19 deaths per 1,000 people; in Sweden, 2.7 COVID-19 deaths per 1,000. Based on this, no one can claim the U.S. did better than Sweden, but it is not a ringing endorsement of the Swedish approach. Neither country protected high-mortality nursing home patients, especially early in the pandemic. Many countries, including their Scandinavian neighbors, had fewer COVID-19 deaths per population than Sweden. Norway, Denmark and Finland all quickly closed their national borders; Finland erected internal borders.

The lesson is that COVID-19 cases and outcomes are probably not primarily determined by national strategy. After four years, no major country avoided high COVID-19 infection rates. While approaches to protect high-risk patients may limit morbidity and mortality at the margins, COVID-19 deaths are related more to national health, age and demographic breakdown, and population immunity. Assessing lockdown strategies by measuring COVID-19 cases and deaths is fraught with error; counterexamples abound.

Non-COVID-19 outcomes

Public health experts use the term “excess deaths” to describe deaths from all causes in a given interval when comparing with the number of expected deaths based on historic patterns. From 2020 to 2023, excess deaths were elevated in every developed country but were up only 5% in Sweden compared with between 10% and 15% in the U.S. The 5% figure is the lowest figure in any industrialized Western country, including the Scandinavian countries with lower COVID-19 mortality. Many excess U.S. deaths can be attributed to lockdowns and include deaths of despair — suicides, drug overdoses and alcoholism — and deaths resulting from delayed health care. Sweden almost certainly avoided many of the deaths associated with lockdowns in the U.S.

The economic figures during the pandemic tell a similar story. According to the Organization for Economic Co operation and Development, the U.S. economy, although fairly resilient, shrank by 1.2% after 2021 against what was forecast. (The Eurozone’s fell by 2.1%.) The Swedish economy grew by 0.4% against what was forecast. Inflationary pressures post-pandemic are not as severe in Sweden as in the U.S., where the government employed a greater, potentially inflationary fiscal stimulus.

The most important outcome difference between the U.S. and Sweden was in children’s education. Prolonged U.S. school closures caused educational damage to students not seen in Sweden. Beginning in March 2020, public schools in the U.S. closed, sending 50 million students home. Some private and religious schools, as well as some schools in Florida, opened up in the second half of 2020, but as many as half of all American public school students stayed out of school until the second half of 2021.

Several researchers from American universities found that by the spring of 2022, the average U.S. student lagged by approximately one-half year in math and one-third of a year in reading.

The Public Health Agency of Sweden recommended that secondary schools and universities switch to remote education for the final three months of the 2020 spring term, but schools opened in autumn. There was another two-month in-school hiatus in December 2020 and January 2021 during a variant outbreak, but almost all preschools and elementary schools remained open. Swedish researchers concluded there was no evidence of a learning loss in early reading skills in Swedish primary school students, and the decision to keep schools open benefited Swedish primary school students.

All things considered …

Taking into account all aspects of the pandemic — excess deaths, economic health and children’s education — the long view suggests that while not ideal, the Swedish strategy was superior. The coronavirus was so contagious and mutated so quickly that tight lockdowns were unsuccessful in controlling spread. And the longer the lockdowns, the greater harm to the populace from factors other than COVID-19.

The effectiveness of lockdowns during COVID-19 is an important question, scientifically and historically — but not a definitive blueprint for the future. The next contagion may spread differently and require different measures.

The most important takeaway from the Swedish COVID-19 experience is not that Sweden controlled COVID-19 better, but that any national strategy must account for the effects on the country’s economic, social, educational and mental health.

Dr. Cory Franklin is a retired intensive care physician and co-author of the new book “The COVID Diaries 2020-2024: Anatomy of a Contagion As It Happened.” He wrote this column for the Chicago Tribune.

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COMMENTS

  1. COVID-19 Information

    Country-Specific Information: As of February 12, 2022, the travel-restrictions upon entry into Norway were lifted. The same rules as prior to the COVID-19 pandemic apply. There are no requirements for testing, quarantine or registration upon arrival in Norway. Visit the Norwegian government website for further updates regarding testing ...

  2. Norway Travel Restrictions: Who Can Enter Norway?

    Norway's travel restrictions in brief. From November 26, there will no longer be a travel ban. If you were entitled to enter Norway before the pandemic, you will be entitled to enter Norway now. ... Norway's coronavirus certificate (also known as a vaccine passport) is available at helsenorge.no. It provides verifiable digital proof of ...

  3. Travel Advisory: New Norwegian Entry and Quarantine Requirements

    On November 7, the Norwegian Government announced that a negative COVID-19 test would be required upon arrival in Norway, for those arriving from a red country, effective November 8. Travelers who cannot present documentation of a test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival may be refused entry.

  4. Coronavirus: Norway

    Few countries still require a Covid-19 certificate, although some require some form of vaccination certificate or a test before departure. You should check which requirements apply for each country on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs' travel information service (regjeringen.no, in Norwegian), or in the Reiseklar app (regjeringen.no, in Norwegian).. Proof of Covid-19 vaccination

  5. Norway International Travel Information

    Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed. Exercise normal precautions in Norway. Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Norway.. If you decide to travel to Norway: Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program to receive travel alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.; Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.

  6. Norway Travel Restrictions

    Find continuously updated travel restrictions for Norway such as border, vaccination, COVID-19 testing, and quarantine requirements. ... Do I need a COVID test to enter Norway? Visitors from the United States are not required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test or antigen result upon entering Norway.

  7. Norway Travel Advisory

    Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed. Exercise normal precautions in Norway. Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Norway.. If you decide to travel to Norway: Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program to receive travel alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.; Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.

  8. IN DETAIL: What you need to know about Norway's new Covid travel rules

    Norway announced a swathe of changes to its Covid-19 entry rules and restrictions that open the border to many travellers from non-European Economic Area, or EEA, (EU countries plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) countries. In addition to this, new rules were announced for UK travellers using digital vaccine certificates.

  9. Entry requirements

    FCDO travel advice for Norway. Includes safety and security, insurance, entry requirements and legal differences. ... COVID-19 rules ... Russian vehicle restrictions.

  10. CDC discourages Norway travel as country remains closed to US tourists

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged Americans to "avoid travel" to Norway and Bulgaria on Monday, citing a "very high level of COVID-19," but most Americans aren't allowed to ...

  11. App

    You can now travel to Oslo just like you could before the start of the pandemic. General remarks. Please note that both national and local rules and regulations related to the coronavirus and travelling in Norway can change on short notice. While all restrictions have now been lifted, Covid-19 is still part of our day-to-day life.

  12. Norway

    COVID-19: All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see Your COVID-19 Vaccination for more information. COVID-19 vaccine. ... Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Norway for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

  13. Norway lifts coronavirus restrictions after 561 days

    Sept. 25, 2021. Norway on Saturday lifted social distancing rules, capacity limits on businesses and other pandemic-era restrictions that have been in place for more than a year. "It is 561 days ...

  14. Norway Relaxes Covid-19 Travel Restrictions, Allows Family Visits

    By David Nikel. Residents of non-EU/EEA countries will now be able to visit family members in Norway provided they fall into one of the following groups: Adult children and stepchildren, as well ...

  15. Norway Extends Travel Restrictions As Covid-19 Cases Rise

    Norway travel restrictions extended: The strict entry ban on most non-EU/EEA residents has been extended following a surge in positive Covid-19 test results in Norway.

  16. Coronavirus in Norway: The Latest News on the COVID-19 Outbreak

    The latest infection numbers in Norway. In total, there have been 1.01 million positive cases in Norway at the time of writing, with 1,513 people now confirmed dead. Many test results are now self-reported. There are 294 people hospitalised around the country, of which 41 are in intensive care. Despite the rapid rise in cases during 2022, the number of hospitalised patients has not increased ...

  17. Norway Removes All Covid-19 Travel Restrictions

    Norway Entry Rules: After almost two years of pandemic-related travel restrictions, Norway's border is now open as it was before the pandemic began.

  18. Norway travel advice

    FCDO travel advice for Norway. Includes safety and security, insurance, entry requirements and legal differences.

  19. Can I travel to Norway? Travel Restrictions & Entry ...

    Find continuously updated travel restrictions for Norway such as border, vaccination, COVID-19 testing, and quarantine requirements. ... Do I need a COVID test to enter Norway? Visitors from India are not required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test or antigen result upon entering Norway.

  20. Norway Travel Rules: No More Covid-19 Testing At Border

    Travel to Norway is the easiest it's been in almost two years following a change in Covid-19 rules. Travelers arriving at the Norwegian border will no longer be required to take a Covid-19 test ...

  21. Norway: COVID-19 Travel Restrictions Found to Violate European Economic

    (June 4, 2021) On May 27, 2021, the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Surveillance Authority announced in a news release that Norwegian COVID-19 travel restrictions on entry into the country violated the free movement provisions of the European Economic Area (EEA) Agreement.. Under the European Economic Area (EEA) Agreement, three members of EFTA—Iceland, Lichtenstein, and Norway—are ...

  22. Travel advice and advisories for Norway

    COVID-19. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air. It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling.

  23. Norway Travel Advice & Safety

    Be careful in airports, train stations, Oslo's main shopping streets, hotel lobbies and restaurants. Avalanches and rockslides can happen in some mountain areas. Extreme weather, floods and landslides can also occur. Check advice on weather and safety conditions before skiing or mountaineering. The northernmost parts of Norway are in the Arctic ...

  24. Can I travel to Norway? Travel Restrictions & Entry ...

    Find continuously updated travel restrictions for Norway such as border, vaccination, COVID-19 testing, and quarantine requirements. ... Do I need a COVID test to enter Norway? Visitors from Australia are not required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test or antigen result upon entering Norway.

  25. China announces 15-day visa-free stay in select provinces for ...

    China has been striving to woo back tourists since it reopened its borders last year and began restoring international flight routes, ending three years of strict COVID-19 policies.

  26. Promoting Accountability for Nicaraguan Officials

    The Department of State today took steps to impose visa restrictions on over 250 members of the Nicaraguan government, including police and paramilitary personnel, penitentiary officials, prosecutors, judges, and public higher education officials, as well as select non-government actors for their roles in supporting the Ortega-Murillo regime in its attacks on human rights and fundamental […]

  27. Cory Franklin: Was Sweden's COVID approach superior to the U.S.?

    In the U.S. overall, there were 3.7 COVID-19 deaths per 1,000 people; in Sweden, 2.7 COVID-19 deaths per 1,000. Based on this, no one can claim the U.S. did better than Sweden, but it is not a ...