Active Travel

Advice to help you make more journeys on foot or by bike

Let’s get moving!

Whether it’s a trip to the shops, the daily commute or the school run, Transport for Greater Manchester’s active travel website has plenty of advice to help you make more journeys on foot or by bike. It’s also the place for the latest news on Greater Manchester’s ambitious plans for the UK’s largest cycling and walking network.

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Take action….

To make a big change, we must all take small actions. Becoming greener and making an impact is easier than you might think. We have put together a range of blogs, articles, toolkits and checklists to help you make a start.

Although we set out with a simple mission to reduce plastic waste, we’ve quickly realised that it’s just one piece in the sustainability puzzle. One of the biggest, but most easily attainable actions we can achieve is to look at where our goods come from and reduce the carbon footprint needed to get a product from manufacturer to consumer. Many of the products we stock are made by local, independent manufactures, who provide us with a wide range of things from reusable face wipes, wax food wraps, face coverings, soap bars, plant pots, kitchen cloths/sponges and butty bags.

Carl from Lentils and Lather

Our aim is to start changing the habits of families in Greater Manchester by getting them to ‘borrow’ rather than ‘buy’ brand new toys. We’re making sure that toys can be reused again and again by children who need and want them – and they are not just sitting in a cupboard or under someone’s bed.

Kim from That Toy Thing

The best part of upcycling is that old furniture is often better made than the equivalent flat-packed furniture we get today and with a little bit of time, love and care, you can create a completely unique piece of furniture for your home that no one else will have. I also love that these pieces of furniture have a history of their own and through transforming and updating them we can breathe a new lease of life into them.

Hannah from Tread Softly

The Green Recovery Challenge Fund is providing a further boost to the ambitions of the Great Manchester Wetlands Partnership to create a thriving, inspirational and connected landscape. It supports the recovery of wildlife through habitat creation and improvement as well as community recovery through providing opportunities for local people to develop skills, knowledge and beneficial connections to their local natural environment.

Jo Kennedy, Coordinator of the Great Manchester Wetlands Partnership

The reason I signed up to the Green Homes Grant scheme was two-fold, selfishly the measures will add value to the properties and make them more valuable in the future. But more importantly it benefits the tenants, keeping them warmer and prevents problems like damp and condensation. Ultimately measures like external wall insulations should keep tenants happier and ensure they remain in the house for longer.

Neil, Rochdale property owner

We used to think we didn’t have enough time to shop on our local market because we were working; how wrong we were?  We discovered it is an amazing place to shop for plastic free. We swapped tea bags for tea leaves and coffee jars for beans which we buy from The Market Grounds on Ashton Market – well worth a visit as the homemade cakes are delicious. All the stall holders have been amazing, not one of them minds us taking our containers to be filled with meat from the butchers. We get our bread, cheese, fruit and veg from the market too.

Julie from Ashton-under-Lyne

Although becoming carbon neutral is important to our organisation, it’s a lot of work for a small team to put the measures into place. The Journey to Net Zero course has given me practical, step-by-step advice that has made it easy for me to lay the foundations for our organisation to be able to take action and achieve our goal of becoming carbon neutral.

Kat Mulhall, Events Manager at Victoria Baths Trust in Manchester

The Business Growth Hub has given us focus and extra knowledge. They’ve helped us form the base to grow sustainably and work efficiently as a team while making us conscious of our environmental impact as a business.

Ollie Birchall, Founder of Nutri Bar

I’ve not really been a cyclist throughout my life, more of a runner to be honest. And certainly not commuted. But I just thought if I’m going to change, surely now is the moment to change. I’m feeling the personal benefits of doing it. You just feel better when you come into work. It clears your head. There are benefits of cutting congestion, cleaning up the air. Everyone benefits when people cycle.

Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester

We think our water fountain is INCREDIBLE, it’s the perfect place for people to ‘refill’ and help themselves to any of the free edibles we’ve got growing in Market Place. We’re so grateful to all the organisations that helped make this happen. Alongside the plastic free motion that was passed by council and helped us achieve our first Surfers Against Sewage objective and in turn our Plastic Free Community status, it shows real commitment in reducing plastic waste and supporting our community.

Pete Fillery, Plastic Free Rammy and Incredible Edible Ramsbottom

I guess I’ve always been what you would call a conscious consumer. I’ve always detested plastic bags, all of my skin care products at home are plastic-free, vegan, and sustainable. My toothbrush is made of bamboo, there’s no plastic anywhere in the house. Everything in the salon has to be vegan – that was the first rule for me. We started with one brand of haircare products that was vegan, organic, and Fairtrade, but the distributor in the UK was wrapping all of the deliveries in plastic, and it felt really needless, so we ditched them.

Rachael, Gronn eco-salon in Bury

Kat mulhall, victoria baths trust, manchester, join our community.

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If you missed it last week, work is underway on our Local Nature Recovery Strategy! Find out more here 👇 #GMGreenCity twitter.com/GMGreenCity/st…

About a year ago from GM Green City's Twitter via Twitter Web App

Work has begun on our new Local Nature Recovery Strategy 💚 Find out more about the strategy and how it will develop here: bit.ly/3PDMYJ7 #GMGreenCity pic.twitter.com/EyN0pIFBKv

Greater Manchester Combined Authority has been allocated around £250,000 to develop its Local Nature Recovery Strategy over the next two years, building on the city-region’s successful pilot 🌿🐞🦋 Find out more here: lnkd.in/eJ58TgiN #GMGreenCity pic.twitter.com/ieBjyE4bdU

Are you ready for the #SingleUsePlastic ban? From October 2023 a ban will be implemented on the supply of a range of single-use plastics like: 🍽 plates 🥣 bowls 🍴 cutlery Find out what this means for your business: gmgreencity.com/singleuseplas… #PlasticFreeGM pic.twitter.com/kijCYZt3XF

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Privacy Overview

Greater Manchester: doing things differently

Greater Manchester Active Travel Fund Schemes

Closed 30 Dec 2021

Opened 4 Feb 2021

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Greater Manchester is on a mission to make on foot and by bike travel the natural choice for everyday journeys. The city region's plans are underpinned by the  Bee Network  - a proposal for Greater Manchester to become the very first city-region in the UK to have a fully joined-up cycling and walking network: the most comprehensive in Britain covering 1,800 miles.

Our aim is to make the region a nicer place to live, work, get on and grow old and to connect every neighbourhood and community, while helping people be less dependent on cars.

During the pandemic, unprecedented levels of walking and cycling have been recorded across the UK. To support this, as part of an  Active Travel Fund  (ATF), Government has committed £2 billion to support the development of interventions to make safe spaces for cycling and walking.

Greater Manchester has been awarded £15.97 million of this funding to deliver 24 miles of cycling and walking routes and dozens of new neighbourhood interventions.

The funding will be used to deliver measures including:

  • ‘School Streets’, where streets around schools are closed to motorists at school times
  • Low-traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs), where residential side streets are closed to through traffic to stop rat-running
  • Segregated cycle lanes
  • Pedestrian improvements

On behalf of the GMCA, Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) and Greater Manchester’s Local Authorities have developed a programme of work to meet the funding criteria. This programme of work is in addition to the significant level of investment underway to deliver the Bee Network.

In early 2021, Greater Manchester will be consulting on the proposed schemes with a view to having schemes delivered by 31 March 2022.

Why your views matter

We are keen to get input from residents and stakeholders on specific schemes and programme level activity so that your views influence the plans and inform decision making.

  • Greater Manchester Active Travel Fund Consultation Plan.pdf 865.5 KB (PDF document)
  • Anyone from any background

Agenda item

Update on public engagement for manchester active travel strategy and investment plan.

  • Meeting of Economy and Regeneration Scrutiny Committee, Thursday, 12th January, 2023 2.00 pm (Item 3.)

Report of the Strategic Director (Growth and Development).

This report provides an update on the public engagement activity carried out to inform the production of the Manchester Active Travel Strategy and Investment Plan, which aims to create a city-wide, Manchester-specific strategy and network plan for active travel investment and a prioritised pipeline of measures to deliver across the city.

The committee considered a report of the Strategic Director (Growth and Development) which provided an update on the public engagement activity carried out to inform the production of the Manchester Active Travel Strategy and Investment Plan (MATSIP).

Key points and themes within the report included:

·    The MATSIP aims to create a city-wide, Manchester-specific strategy and network plan for active travel investment and a prioritised pipeline of measures to deliver across the city;

·    Public and stakeholder engagement was carried out between July and December 2022, including online consultation, public engagement workshops and email responses;

·    Key themes arising from the public consultation, including safety; maintenance of existing infrastructure; new infrastructure; and non-infrastructure measures;

·    A draft network map; and

·    Next steps for the development of the MATSIP.

Key points and queries that arose from the committee’s discussions included:

·    Welcoming progress on the Strategy and noting its importance;

·    Whether the Strategy could be more specific about what inequalities it aimed to reduce, and how this would be achieved;

·    The need for an active travel network to be well-linked with schools and other infrastructure;

·    The impact of speeding and pavement parking as barriers to active travel;

·    The need for an active travel network to be integrated with public transport;

·    Bus regulation was needed to encourage walking and reduce car usage;

·    The impact of building works on reducing capacity for active travel by obstructing pavements;

·    How the Council worked with developers to incorporate active travel provisions into major schemes;

·    The need to repair gullies to improve road safety and encourage walking;

·    Whether previous consultations on active travel were incorporated into the development of the MATSIP;

·    A need for places to permanently store bicycles, particularly for residents in apartments; and

·    Noting a distinct focus on cycling in the MATSIP and expressing hopes for there to be a balance between different active travel modes in the final Strategy.

The Executive Member for Environment and Transport introduced the item and explained that the Council had taken a different approach to consulting on the draft MATSIP by holding face-to-face engagement sessions as opposed to relying on online forms of consultation. She expressed her thanks to the members, residents and community groups who responded to the consultation and stated that this helped to inform a coherent and robust Strategy that would help to take advantage of all funding opportunities.

The Principal Policy Officer explained that the consultation was undertaken in partnership with Sweco over a 6-week period in autumn 2022. He stated that the consultation responses had provided useful key themes to highlight in the final Strategy, which would be considered in February by the Environment and Climate Change Scrutiny Committee and, if endorsed, the Executive.

In response to a member’s question around inequalities, the Executive Member for Environment and Transport highlighted that the Strategy aimed to make all active travel modes accessible to everyone, which would help to alleviate financial and health inequalities. The Principal Policy Officer advised that the Strategy would be based around five objectives, including reducing citywide inequalities, and further detail on this would be included in the final report considered by the Environment and Climate Change Scrutiny Committee in February. He also highlighted the prioritisation tool for the Strategy which would utilise qualitative and quantitative data on multiple deprivation, health data, population and employment densities to assess where investment would be best targeted to reduce these inequalities.

A need for the active travel network to be well-linked with schools was acknowledged and members were advised that Manchester was taking part in the Greater Manchester School Streets Pilot, which placed restrictions on motor traffic at drop off and pick up times at 7 schools in the city. This would encourage people to make the school run and other everyday journeys by bike or on foot and would enable children to breathe cleaner air on the school run. The Strategy would also reference the Council’s aspirations to expand the School Streets programme and it was hoped that national legislation may be enacted to enable the Council to enforce further restrictions on motor traffic around schools. The Principal Policy Officer suggested other ways of addressing parking issues around schools, such as traffic restraint measures and filtered neighbourhoods.

In response to issues raised by the committee regarding pavement parking and accessibility and speeding, the Executive Member for Environment and Transport advised that the Council’s Highways Access Group which works with officers at the design stage on any new development to ensure that these issues are considered earlier in the development process.

The Strategic Director (Growth and Development) noted a need to look at active travel in an integrated way and explained that the Strategy sat alongside a number of other strategies related to mobility but was being developed with consideration given to the city’s growth ambitions and key growth locations.

It was noted that movement strategies, public transport amenities and active travel provisions were key in the planning of major developments, such as the Co-op Live Arena. The Strategic Director (Growth and Development) confirmed that this would be undertaken through the planning process but negotiations and discussions with developers would also be held.

It was also confirmed that the Council worked with developers to minimise disruption from building works through sequencing and aligning programmes where possible.

In response to the Chair’s query as to whether previous consultations on active travel were incorporated into the development of the MATSIP, the Principal Policy Officer advised that the technical work undertaken by Sweco included responses from previous consultations and that this would be clarified in the final report.

In summarising the item, the Chair proposed recommending that the Committee’s comments be included in the full MATSIP report going to Environment and Climate Change Scrutiny Committee and the Executive in February, which was supported by the Committee. He also informed members that the Committee was invited to attend the Environment and Climate Change Scrutiny Committee meeting when the final report would be considered.

That the committee

1.   notes the report;

2.   notes that the full MATSIP document and a summary report will be brought to the February 2023 Environment and Climate Change Scrutiny Committee and, if agreed, Executive for adoption; and

3.   recommends that the full MATSIP document reflects the Committee’s comments and includes definitions as to what is meant by “inequalities of access” as stated at section 3.4(d) of the report.

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Policy@Manchester Articles

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Image of a path through a green park with a few people walking and cycling through it.

Charting a path to clean air: A community-centred approach to active travel policy

Sheena Cruickshank

Greater Manchester has amongst the worst air quality in the UK. Air pollution causes many health problems , as well as worsening pre-existing health conditions. Increasingly, Greater Manchester residents are concerned about poor air quality and want actions to be taken. Yet, budgets that could support change are under more and more constraints. In this article,   Professor Sheena Cruickshank  addresses how focused comm unity research and partnership s can identify and prioritise transport needs , while simultaneously reduc ing the impacts of air pollution.  

  • Engaging with communities is key to promoting awareness of pollution risks, as well as understanding local sources of pollution and the barriers to active travel.  
  • Collaborative working between local communities, healthcare workers and researchers is a vital tool to develop effective active travel infrastructure.  
  • By engaging with communities, priority actions can be identified that represent “quick wins” to encourage active travel uptake which may in turn reduce pollution.  

Air pollution in Greater Manchester  

Outdoor air pollution from vehicle exhausts, industrial waste, fuels and refuse burning contributes to 4.2 million deaths every year. Pollution is a causative factor that can also worsen conditions such as heart disease, stroke, COPD, asthma and acute respiratory infections such as COVID-19 and influenza. The impact of pollution on health is unequal, disproportionately impacting the elderly, the very young, those with pre-existing health conditions, and people in lower income neighbourhoods .   

Greater Manchester (GM) has among the worst levels of pollution in the UK. It has been estimated that poor air quality contributes to around 1,200 premature deaths each year in the city region. Vehicular transport is still a major contributor to pollution. P lans to improve pavements and implement cycle lane networks are underway in some boroughs of GM as part of the  Bee Network . However, the network does not include all parts of GM and notably some areas remain pollution “hot spots”. One such place is Ardwick, a central area of Manchester which is bordered by busy major roads.   

Residents in Ardwick are concerned about the impacts of pollution on their health and, particularly, their children’s health. Indeed, analysis of pollution levels near several GM schools including the primary school in Ardwick reveal high levels of   pollution . In consultation workshops, Ardwick residents expressed concerns about high levels of pollution, and safety of pathways, pavements, and traffic crossings, stating all contributed to a reduction in physical activity and use of active transport (such as walking or cycling).   

Harnessing the knowledge of community hubs  

Building on a previous project , we received funding to conduct follow-up research in Ardwick to explore the barriers to active travel and develop solutions to encourage walking in the area. Researchers conducted participatory mapping exercises with Ardwick residents via community hubs, including Ardwick Climate Action, Medlock Primary School, the local Scout Group and Brunswick Church Women’s Group. Ardwick Climate Action  are a group of local committed residents who, amongst other projects, have established a programme called Ardwick Stepping Stones , which has involved both renewing green spaces and creating small planted havens throughout the neighbourhood.  

The purpose of the mapping sessions was to facilitate discussion and capture information about the regular journeys that people make, the routes they choose, the modes of transport selected, and the general traffic-related issues experienced in and around the area. In addition, site visits were conducted to observe the traffic, roads, footpaths, cycle routes, parks, and facilities in the area.  

The work identified hotspots for fast-moving, dense traffic and poorly lit paths, with one resident remarking: ‘I really think we should have more traffic lights and lamp posts.’   It was notable that busy roads were heavily used by pedestrians, particularly children on the school route, yet the roads were felt to be dangerous, as one resident highlighted: ‘Cars come flying off the roundabout, cars don’t stop.’ People cited that at busy times it could take 15 minutes or more for a gap in the traffic to enable them to cross such roads safely. Other issues identified included blocked drains close to dropped curbs, making access difficult for wheelchair and pram users.  

Hyper-local pollution monitoring  

The mapping exercise and site visits enabled focused research on pollution monitoring. Multiple readings of black carbon were taken at different locations surrounding busy polluted areas, quieter roads, and green areas included in the Ardwick Stepping Stones project. Black carbon is found in PM2.5  (that is, particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns) and comes from fires and vehicle emissions. PM2.5 is known to be very damaging to health when breathed into the lungs. Although black carbon is not routinely measured, research suggests average street levels of 1039 ng/m 3 in urban areas. However, in Ardwick, pollution, at times, exceeded 3000 ng/m 3 on busy roads. Quieter roads and green spaces had significantly lower levels. This was most notable at the school entrance points next to the main road (the A6), which had significantly higher levels of pollution than the entrance on the residential road. The mapping exercises had revealed many children walked to school along the A6. This is a cause of particular concern, given the A6 is one of the most polluted sites.  

Based on the collective data, a walking route was planned in partnership with Ardwick Climate Action and residents that would avoid busy areas and take in more of the green spaces. An artist, Sally Gilford, was commissioned to create wayfinders in the community to indicate the walking route for residents. These have QR codes linking to information about the plants, the research conducted at the University and local information. During installation of the wayfinders, a resident passerby commented on how moved he was to see this and how this type of project really matters. Work in Spring 2024 will seek further resident feedback about the project.  

By partnering with the community, the project has been able to highlight particular areas that may require safety interventions and should enable targeted action which, in times where there are budgetary constraints, is all the more important. Notably, planted areas were linked to lower pollution, supporting the idea that planting, even in small pockets of land, can make a positive, cost-effective difference to air quality. Ardwick, like several boroughs in GM is a spoke that connects areas that are well served by local bicycle hubs (known as the Bee Network). Enhancing infrastructure for active travel therefore enables safe travel, not just for the community in Ardwick, but has positive effects for neighbouring communities who may want to take active travel via Ardwick. This approach highlights that by taking a local community-centred approach to policy interventions, you can deliver real improvements to active travel take-up. Given the known benefits to health and wellbeing for communities of active travel, it is imperative that we learn these lessons for how we construct and deliver policy locally.  

Policy recommendations  

  • Policymakers should adopt place-based participatory research geared towards the needs of local communities to tackle air pollution levels. By employing community research, policies can be targeted to need, maximising impact and community value.  
  • Transport for Greater Manchester and local planners should strengthen links with neighbourhoods and community groups – for example, via community champions or funding similar schemes – to enhance the effectiveness of the long-term Greater Manchester Combined Authority transport strategy and the continued development of the Bee Network. This can ensure that the transport options and infrastructure work for each community and connect communities and areas in a way that allows residents and commuters to use active travel for their complete journey.  
  • Green spaces, even small, planted areas, lower pollution levels, and encourage active travel take up. Urban planners and developers should include a minimum green space quota in all new transportation infrastructure projects. This might include ‘pocket parks’ along busy roads to significantly and cost-effectively reduce pollution exposure.  

active travel manchester

About Sheena Cruickshank

Professor Sheena Cruickshank leads the University's Public Engagement with Research activities and lectures in gastrointestinal immunology.

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Peaks & Puddles

Greater Manchester publishes first Active Travel Design Guide

  • Post author By Anthony
  • Post date 28th April 2021

active travel manchester

Transport for Greater Manchester and the region’s Combined Authority have completed an important step in the implementation of their Bee Network walking and cycling plans, publishing an Active Travel Design Guide that sets out the key rules for designing future schemes in its ten boroughs.

The document is 27 pages (PDF) of perfect bedtime reading for anyone who dreams of protected cycle lanes, well-lit walking routes and Cycle Optimised Protected Signal (CYCLOPS) junctions. Which is all of us who like getting around without a car, right?

So far only an “interim” guide, it references several existing publications, but notably the Department for Transport’s surprisingly excellent LTN 1/20 . If you’re not up to speed, that’s a local transport note document published last year which sets out the new standards for cycling infrastructure design, now quoted endlessly by cycle geeks.

The Greater Manchester design guide spurs from this slightly to focus on both cycling and walking, with 18 “key issues” including width of facilities, surface quality, gradients and even things like headroom on cycle facilities that can otherwise be overlooked.

Including pedestrians means that clear guidelines are also set out for dedicated walking facilities, such as the width: 2 metres or 1.4 metres as an absolute minimum where necessary, in case you’re wondering. In fact, “a width of less than 1.4m will not permit use by a double buggy user and is unacceptable on the Bee Network,” it says. Nice one.

It’s also wonderfully clear that, while we use “pedestrians” and “cyclists”, we’re actually talking about huge sub-sets of users within each of those (from wheelchair and pram users to tricycles and cargo bikes), and that new schemes need to be completely inclusive.

active travel manchester

The tone is simple and frank, which is good since all ten councils need to follow these guidelines if they’re to receive funding for future schemes. (That’s an important point too, because Stockport for one when presented with LTN 1/20 guidelines have countered by quoting back a line contained within that, ultimately “local authorities are responsible for setting design standards for their roads”. Ie. they can ignore the whole damn thing if they want to.)

Lighting is one point where the Bee Network seems to want to put itself a cut above your average right of way, even stating “off-road Beeways should also be provided with full ambient lighting, ideally to the same standards referenced above.” It goes on to state in sensitive areas this could mean low-level bollards or solar studs in the path.

The one issue where some have noticed the guide stumbles a bit is with that old favourite: access control barriers on traffic free routes.

active travel manchester

LTN 1/20 states quite fiercely “access control measures, such as chicane barriers and dismount signs, should not be used.”

Greater Manchester’s guide on the other hand wavers to say that, actually, they can be used but “must have clear, specific, local justification agreed through the Cycling and Walking Design Review Panel.”

“Acceptable solutions will usually either use bollards or offset barriers/gates with sufficient clearance to permit use by all legitimate users.” (The sufficient clearance apparently being just 1.5 metres.)

So, while awful a-frames, k-frames and kissing gates are all outlawed, we may yet see a Bee Network filled with frustrating pinch-point chicanes — sorry, “offset barriers” — when actually, a humble bollard or two would do.

And a new Active Travel website, too

Transport for Greater Manchester have also launched a new, dedicated website for active travel . Along with tips on how to start walking and cycling, it provides a good single resource for all the many Bee Network schemes.

active travel manchester

A complete map and dedicated pages for each project give a brief overview with links to the local council websites for plans and further updates. This information used to be quite scattered and hard to get an overview on, so it’s a very welcome improvement.

One thing notably missing, however, is a link to TfGM’s really useful online cycling maps . They don’t seem to be referenced anywhere and, given the online version hasn’t been updated since 2019 , let’s hope they’ve not fallen by the wayside altogether.

Bee Network buses, trams and trains?

It was reported recently by WalkRideGM that Andy Burnham “plans to rebrand” the whole of Greater Manchester’s public transport network as the “Bee Network” if he wins the upcoming mayoral election.

active travel manchester

This likely follows on from the welcome decision to progress with taking back control of the region’s buses , which included a teasing video showing bumble-bee yellow buses — and cycle hire docks.

But then, what is the cycling and walking network? It’s already been through one rebrand, after the original Beelines name was dropped due to a trademark issue . TfGM do now own the use of “Beeways” , which is a rather nice, succinct alternative, so perhaps we could see that brought into widespread use.

  • Places Greater Manchester , Manchester , Stockport , Tameside
  • Tags Bee Network , Guidance , Route Design , Transport for Greater Manchester , Websites

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About Peaks & Puddles

Hello, I'm Anthony. I started Peaks & Puddles to chart the ups and downs of cycling and walking the edges of the Peak District around Buxton, Macclesfield and Stockport, and to help more people explore this brilliant landscape between town and country. Find out more about me and Peaks & Puddles here .

Trafford Council introduces new active travel measures on Talbot Road

Dec 20, 2023 | Transport

active travel manchester

New measures to promote cycling and walking in Trafford have officially been unveiled.

Council Leader Tom Ross visited the junction of Talbot Road and White City Way in Stretford to see the various improvements which include a new pedestrian and cyclist friendly junction, smart traffic lights and enhancements to pathways with new cycleways purpose built.

The works are part of a wider initiative to promote active travel (walking and cycling) along Talbot Road up to Chester Road. These aim to have a positive effect on local travel choices and improve healthy living opportunities.

With Trafford a busy area with high traffic volumes, these measure stand to improve driving as well as active travel users. New junctions are clearer for all and smart lights speed up travel whenever possible.

These works have been funded through the Greater Manchester Combined Authority’s Mayor’s Challenge Fund for active travel.

Cllr Aidan Williams, Trafford Council’s Executive Member for Climate Change, said: “I am delighted with the results of this new scheme. Trafford Council is totally committed to active travel and making the roads safer for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians alike. We are proud of the work we are carrying out and will continue to promote this type of environmentally-friendly travel throughout the borough.”

Other parts of the Talbot Road scheme will be completed in early 2024. Details of those openings will be made available in due course.

Richard Nickson, Active Travel Programme Director at Transport for Greater Manchester, said: “The now-completed improvements on Talbot Road are going to make journeys much safer for people who are walking, wheeling or cycling along this route. Building safer junctions that provide protection for pedestrians and cyclists on busy roads are key part of the Bee Network, our vision for a fully-integrated transport system connecting all modes of travel. “They enable easier access to public transport by making it safer and more convenient to cross the road and hop on a bus. And as we begin to roll out bus franchising to other areas of Greater Manchester, it will be important to deliver these kind of changes to support bus and Metrolink journeys.”

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Chris Boardman named permanent National Active Travel Commissioner alongside other senior Active Travel England appointments

Active Travel England will be headed up permanently by Chris Boardman with Chief Executive Officer Danny Williams and Chief Operating Officer Louise Wilkinson.

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Chris Boardman will continue to inspire the nation into getting about on foot and by bike after being appointed as permanent National Active Travel Commissioner alongside several other senior officials, the Department for Transport ( DfT ) announced today (28 June 2022).

Chris, who has served as Interim Commissioner since January 2022, will head up the new executive agency alongside Chief Executive Officer ( CEO ) Danny Williams and Chief Operating Officer ( COO ) Louise Wilkinson.

Over the past decade, the Olympian has been one of the country’s most prominent active travel advocates and has served in Greater Manchester as Transport Commissioner and Walking and Cycling Commissioner.

Danny Williams, who is expected to be confirmed as Active Travel England’s CEO shortly, has spent over 25 years leading media businesses, including setting-up a start-up and developing large and high performing teams within global corporations.

In his spare time, Danny has been advocating for change in how villages, towns and cities approach walking and cycling. He was a member of the Mayor of London’s Roads Task Force.  

Louise Wilkinson has a long career in strategic finance and accounting within the civil service and local government. Most recently she has worked for the Cabinet Office as a Deputy Director of Finance.  

Active Travel England also today announced Graham Grant as its Director of Planning and Development. Grant, currently Assistant Director of Transport at Newcastle City Council, is expected to take up his post in the autumn. He joins Brian Deegan, who was announced as Director of Inspections in May 2022.

Confirming the appointments, Cycling Minister Trudy Harrison said:

Today’s appointments are another great step for Active Travel England as it continues to make sure getting around our towns and cities on foot or by bike is an easy and attractive option. Chris, Danny, Louise and the rest of the incoming team are hugely respected experts in their field and are dedicated to making people-friendly streets a reality. I wish them every success and will do all I can to support them.

Chris Boardman said: 

I am thrilled to be announced as permanent National Active Travel Commissioner and to be given this incredible opportunity. To help change the travel culture of a nation is by far the most important thing I have ever, or will ever, be involved in. For cycling and walking to become the natural choice for shorter journeys, people must feel safe and the options must be easy. Active Travel England aims to help local authorities across the country deliver that environment, so that people can get to schools, shops and workplaces under their own steam. That’s the kind of place people want to live and the freedoms they want for their children.

Danny Williams added: 

If you were to put down on paper my dream job, this is it. I’m passionate about building successful teams from the ground up and I have been an active travel advocate for the past 20 years. It’s a huge privilege to be able to combine those interests as CEO of Active Travel England. I want to support councils to be bold and create an environment that is going to change people’s everyday lives for the better. It doesn’t get more exciting than that.

Louise Wilkinson added: 

I can’t wait to take on the role of COO at Active Travel England and be part of this exciting journey. This is something I really believe in and I am proud to be part of a team that will help transform active travel and deliver real change.  I will be focusing on putting in place all the things we need to succeed and to ensure that councils and other delivery partners are supported every step of the way.

Last month DfT announced that millions of people across the country will benefit from cleaner air and cheaper ways to travel and keep active thanks to £200 million of government funding for 134 new active travel schemes.

Active Travel England will oversee delivery as part of its ambition to drive up the standards of infrastructure across the country and make walking, wheeling and cycling the easiest choice for local journeys.   

Chris Boardman has been appointed with immediate effect. Danny Williams and Louise Wilkinson are expected to take up their posts in August.

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Related Active Travel England announcements

  • Active Travel England update written ministerial statement, published 28 June 2022

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Money blog: House purchases hit by 'global payments issue'; one of UK's top plastic surgery firms collapses

Welcome to the Money blog, your place for personal finance and consumer news and tips. Leave a comment with your thoughts below.

Thursday 18 July 2024 16:44, UK

  • Global payments issue hits house purchases could be impacted
  • One of UK's largest plastic surgery providers collapses
  • Earnings growth falls - and it could have wider consequences
  • Sainsbury's increases meal deal price
  • Pret scrapping five coffees a day subscription - but cuts some prices

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A global payments issue that hit the Bank of England this afternoon has been resolved - you can read more about this in our 15.03 post. 

The Bank has just issued a statement saying a third-party supplier has fixed the problem and payments are "settling as normal". 

"We expect that all payments received by the Bank today will be settled by the end of the day," it says. 

"If you are concerned about a CHAPS payment you plan to make or receive today, please contact your bank, or other payment service provider." 

Sky News understands the problem was not caused by a cyber incident. 

The CHAPS system is used for high-value payments, meaning some house purchases have been delayed today. 

One of the UK's largest plastic surgery providers has collapsed. 

The Skin Group, which has more than 70 branches across the UK, was also the owner of Skin Clinics, the Harley Medical Group, Skin Brands the Skin Experts and ABC Medical. 

In a message to customers, it said all the brands had "ceased trading". 

Its website displayed a note saying the company had "undertaken an extensive process to secure investment to enable it to continue trading but sadly we've been unsuccessful".

"We recognise this outcome will have a significant impact on our team members and our customers and we are deeply sorry for the stress and inconvenience this has caused." 

Clients still awaiting test results will be contacted as soon as possible, it added.

Communications firm Kendrick, which was Skin's PR agency, wrote in a post on Instagram that it was "blindsided" by the news.

"We have no information as yet regarding how things are being managed by Skin or the administrators, or how cancelled patient appointments / payments etc will be redressed," it said.

"We are sorry to have no news to share – this situation has blindsided us all. Should anything change in this regard, we will share relevant updates on our channels." 

A "global payments issue" has hit the Bank of England's CHAPS service. 

The issue is causing delays to high-value and time-sensitive payments, including some house purchases, the Bank says. 

"We are mindful of the impact this is likely to have and are working closely with a third-party supplier, industry and other authorities to resolve the issue as promptly as possible," it says. 

Retail payment systems and cash machines have not been affected. 

It is not clear how many payments have been impacted by the issue, which the Bank has been aware of since midday. 

Sky News understands a cyber incident has been ruled out.

Director of Thomas Legal, Chris Barry says the issue will affect property exchanges and completions up and down the country today. 

"Whilst many completions are preset and happen earlier in the day, some will still happen between the issue being announced and the cut off of 4pm," he told Newspage. 

"For many, this has just made an already stressful day even more stressful. Most contracts have a 12pm or 1pm hard time embedded, so if the payment is being made now, they are technically in breach of contract." 

CHAPS is one of the largest high-value payment systems in the world. 

High street banks and a number of international banks use the system to make large payments, with the system processing around £350bn a day. 

It can also be used by people spending lots of money - up to millions of pounds - on items such as cars, boats and properties. 

Our business presenter Ian King says it's not uncommon for CHAPS to experience problems, but the fact it's a global issue "does raise one or two eyebrows". 

"The problems usually crop up when one bank or another is experiencing a particularly heavy workload, and that's when delays can happen," he says. 

"Potentially, it could cause a lot of aggravation for people who are trying to complete on a housing transaction today.

"It is a big part of the financial plumbing for the financial services industry." 

Has your house purchase been delayed because of the issue? If so, we would like to hear from you. 

To get in touch,  send us a message on WhatsApp.

By doing so, you agree we can broadcast, publish and edit the material without any payment being due to you.

By James Sillars , business reporter

There has been no second interest rate cut by the European Central Bank (ECB), as widely expected.

The body responsible for monetary policy in the euro area maintained its current guidance on the path ahead following its latest meeting.

As such, there were no hints about what the governing council might do at its next meeting in September.

The rates announcement said that domestic price pressures remained elevated, and inflation would remain above the ECB's 2% target well into next year.

Pret A Manger is scrapping its popular five coffees a day subscription deal - but is also cutting prices of a number of products. 

Under the current club offer, which has been running since 2020, customers pay £30 a month for the free drinks and a 20% discount on the rest of its menu. 

But, from 3 September, Club Pret members will pay £10 a month to receive 50% off on up to five barista-made drinks a day. 

The "simpler" scheme will initially launch at £5 a month for existing and new subscribers, but will increase on 31 March 2025. 

The change also means an end to the 20% discount, with the chain saying it "never really got comfortable" with dual pricing.

In a letter sent to customers,  Pret's managing director Clare Clough said: "Four years and over a quarter of a billion coffees later, we have decided that it's time to rethink how it works.

"We know this is a change. But with Club Pret subscription, our coffees, teas, coolers and iced drinks will continue to be the best offer on the high street, and at a much more accessible price than the £360 a year people have to pay for the current scheme.

"Given the majority of our customers are not Club Pret subscribers, our priority now is to focus on better value for everyone."

In March, the chain implemented a crackdown to prevent Club Pret subscribers from sharing free drinks.

Some customers were exploiting loopholes by sharing subscription benefits. 

Since then, club members have been required to use the app to redeem their complimentary drinks. 

Pret also announced that its signature 100% organic arabica filter coffee would drop from £1.80 to 99p, and its all butter croissant will also drop from £2.30 to £1.99.

For Savings Guide this week, Savings Champion co-founder Anna Bowes explains why savers should be excited by yesterday's inflation figures... 

Headline inflation as measured by the Consumer Prices Index remained at the government target of 2% for June.

It returning to these levels means prices are rising less quickly than they have been over the last couple of years. 

For savers, it means that, currently, over 90% of savings accounts are offering a rate that beats the rising current cost of living.

But savers should be aware there are still accounts out there paying less than 2%. 

The National Savings & Investments Investment Account is paying just 1% - when you could earn 5.2% in the Ulster Bank Loyalty Account. 

On a deposit of £10,000, that would mean that you'd earn just £100 rather than £520 with over 12 months. 

More importantly, with your cash earning less than inflation, it is failing to keep up with the rising cost of living, so the real value of your cash is being decimated.

There are currently more accounts than ever for savers to choose from, but don't let choice paralysis and inertia stop you from earning the interest you deserve.

Here are some of your other options...

Santander has announced it will "now stop any payments with profanities in the reference" for its business banking customers. 

Several high street banks do not allow swearing in the references already so Santander is not alone, but it has still raised a few eyebrows.

A Santander spokesperson told the Money team it had implemented the guidance to protect customers. 

"Sadly, we've seen an increase in the number of customers receiving abusive messages and threats via faster payment messages," they said. 

"This can include customers in abusive relationships or those that have put restraining orders in place to protect themselves, and go on to receive death threats and targeted abuse in payments being made to them. 

"We hope that this new guidance will help our most vulnerable customers and protect them from receiving abuse via payments."

You can let us know your thoughts on the changes in the comments section above - but here's what some business people told Newspage...

Graham Cox, director at Self-Employed Mortgage Hub, said: "When you consider the vile comments left on social media these days, it can't be much fun for Santander's staff constantly viewing profanities on banking transactions."

Stephen Perkins, managing director at Yellow Brick Mortgages, said Santander censoring and blocking payments seemed "a little heavy-handed".

"While it's great that Santander cares about decency, this move feels a bit like your overly strict aunt scolding you for harmless jokes. We really don't need Big Brother banking," said Ranald Mitchell, director at Charwin Mortgages.

And Hannah Bashford, director at Model Financial Solutions, said: "Santander's proposal to filter profanities in the business banking app is unnecessary and may have the unintended consequence of blocking business for some the Britain's rudest named villages. 

"Does that mean all holidays to Sandy Balls are cancelled?"

Sainsbury's has increased the cost of its lunchtime meal deal by 25p from £3.50 to £3.75. 

It is the first price hike for the deal in three years. 

Here's some of the reaction we've seen on X...

For £3.75, customers can get a main, which includes a range of sandwiches, salads and wraps, a snack and a drink. 

A Sainsbury's spokesperson told the Money blog that the supermarket wants to make "good food affordable and accessible to everyone". 

"We continue to offer one of the best value meal deals around, with millions of delicious possible combinations which could mean customers save more than half off the usual price - whether they're grabbing a hot bacon roll, a fruit pot and a coffee for breakfast, or a lunchtime sarnie with crisps and a smoothie," they said. 

How do other meal deals compare? 

The price hike now makes a Sainsbury's meal deal one of most expensive supermarket deals in the country. 

It comes behind Waitrose , which charges £5 for the main, snack and drink combo. 

Tesco comes in third place ,  charging £3.90 to customers without a Clubcard. However, this price falls to £3.40 for those who are part of the loyalty scheme - one of the cheapest deals. 

A Morrisons  meal deal costs £3.50, which is the same as Co-op . 

Asda doesn't offer a fixed price for its meal deal. Instead, it operates a 3 for 2 system, which gives customers the cheapest item for free. 

Let us know which you think is the best value in the comments section

By Sarah Taaffe-Maguire , business reporter

The pound has held on to much of the high it gained on the back of higher-than-expected inflation data yesterday.

Sterling remains close to the year high against the dollar and nearly a two-year high against the euro recorded yesterday afternoon. 

£1 buys $1.299 and €1.188. 

These exchange rates are good for any Britons travelling to the US and to any of the 20 countries using the euro - their pound will now go further than it has done in the past 12 months for dollars and 23 months for euro. 

There could be a broader benefit to consumers if the rate remains good for sterling - the cost of importing goods bought with dollars and euro could be less.

One key purchase bought in dollars in oil - which is up from Wednesday to $85.16 for a barrel of Brent crude oil. 

Share prices of the major London Stock Exchange indexes are up - the Financial Times Stock Exchange (FTSE) 100 rose 0.77% and the FTSE 250 was up 0.76%. 

People in the commuter city of St Albans have seen the biggest house price falls in England so far this year, according to a property platform.

Almost half of homes in the Hertfordshire city have seen their value drop in the last six months - the average drop has been £4,500, Zoopla says. 

The area has the highest house prices in the East of England, making it one of the least affordable places to be outside of London. 

Potential buyers have struggled to get on the property ladder due to soaring mortgage rates, which has caused sellers to drop their asking prices, Zoopla said. 

The fall in values also reflected the end of a property boom in the city, which came during the pandemic as hybrid workers looked for houses with more outdoor space. 

The only area that saw more homes lose value between January and June was Dumfries in Scotland - 54% of homes lost £2,100 in value.

This is despite the rest of the country seeing signs of recovery in the property market. 

Half of the country's 30 million homes increased in price, with properties typically up by £2,400.

Some 10 million properties are estimated to have increased in value by £5,000 or more in the past six months.

Towns and cities in northern England were particularly likely to have experienced gains over the first half of 2024.

Homeowners in Oldham, Wakefield and Durham were most likely to have seen the value of their homes increase.

Owners of terraced homes were seeing more gains than owners of other property types.

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active travel manchester

Consultations and surveys City Centre Active Travel Scheme consultation

This consultation has now closed.

Our city centre is the fasting growing outside London, with a potential 100,000 more jobs and 50,000 more homes over the next 20 years. As our city grows, we want to think about our city centre streets differently:

  • Looking at new and better ways to improve use of our public spaces.
  • Address challenges which the city faces and deliver on our cleaner air targets.
  • We want to ensure the city centre's economic recovery from Covid-19 and protect the businesses and people that have contributed to the city’s prosperity over the past decade.
  • Our central aim is for 90% of all morning peak trips to the city centre to be made on foot, by cycle or using public transport by 2040.We can achieve this with the right tram, rail and bus connections in the right places, all working together and interlinked with high quality walking and cycling routes and facilities.
  • We want to improve safety and encourage people to travel across and around the city by walking and cycling

This scheme, paid for by the government’s Active Travel Fund, aims to create an easier, safer and more attractive route for people to move between Piccadilly, Victoria and Deansgate stations, and to link into other walking and cycling routes.

It focuses on areas not already covered by other walking and cycling improvement schemes (along Deansgate, and in the Northern Quarter), including:

  • Deansgate north - Victoria Bridge Street to Blackfriars Street;
  • Deansgate south – Quay Street to Whitworth Street Junction,
  • Whitworth Street to the Albion Street junction,
  • Whitworth Street/Aytoun Street junction along Aytoun Street to Portland Street.

Have your say

We would like to know where you think improvements are needed, and what changes would make it more likely that you would walk or cycle this route.

The Active Travel Fund was established to support local transport authorities with improving cycling and walking facilities. The funding was originally announced by the Secretary of State on 23 May 2020 as part of the work to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, and aims to help people to get to their destination safely and quickly, while helping ensure there is enough space for them to observe social distancing guidelines, as well as to regenerate local economies after coronavirus.

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Feedback submitted to us on this form is monitored but you won’t receive a reply. In an emergency, visit our emergency contact details page . Please don't include any personal or financial information, for example your National Insurance or credit card numbers.

IMAGES

  1. Active Travel in Manchester

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  2. Greater Manchester's Active Travel Mission

    active travel manchester

  3. Active Travel in Manchester

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  4. Active Travel in Manchester

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  5. Greater Manchester publishes first Active Travel Design Guide

    active travel manchester

  6. Greater Manchester publishes first Active Travel Design Guide • Peaks

    active travel manchester

COMMENTS

  1. Home

    For travel by bike and on foot in Greater Manchester, this is your first stop. Find walking and cycling resources along with ways to help you get more active, feel better, save money, cut congestion and make GM a better, more active place to live.

  2. Council publishes road map for ambitious Active Travel plans

    Council publishes road map for ambitious Active Travel plans. Thursday 2 February 2023. The proposed active travel network. Manchester City Council is to set out a bold and ambitious strategy which seeks to dramatically increase the number of people using Active Travel across Manchester. It is the Council's view that everybody in Manchester ...

  3. Active travel

    Active travel. Walking. Cycling. Active neighbourhood schemes. Active travel strategy. Report a problem on a road or pavement. Sports and leisure. Manchester cycling and walking forum.

  4. PDF Manchester Active Travel Strategy

    The Manchester Active Travel Strategy and Investment Plan sets out our ambitions to . enable a wider range of travel choices for everyone to meet our our priorities to . 2025 by: • Improving active travel and aligning this with investment in other non-car modes across the city to support growth of the economy, contribute to economic

  5. Active Travel in Manchester

    Our ambitions. Invest a minimum of £10 per capita per year. Double the number of people who live within a 10 minute walk or cycle from a green space. Enable safe access to the regional centre, district centres, parks and other key destinations. Enable safe active travel to schools and colleges. Improve citywide health and wellbeing through ...

  6. Greater Manchester's Active Travel Mission

    Refreshing Greater Manchester'sActive Travel Mission. In recent years, Greater Manchester has committed itself to building a world-class walking, wheeling and cycling network, a commitment that was restated at the launch of the new Greater Manchester Strategy in March 2022. The city-region's vision and plan for Active Travel is impressive and ...

  7. Made to Move

    In recent years, Greater Manchester has committed itself to building a world-class walking, wheeling and cycling network, a commitment that was restated at the launch of the new Greater Manchester Strategy in March 2022. The city-region's vision and plan for Active Travel is impressive and the next phase is to ensure active travel is now ...

  8. Where you live

    A staggering 250 million car trips every year in Greater Manchester are less than one kilometre. That's a four minute bike ride or ten minutes on foot. Reaching for the car keys every time you leave the house is a long-held habit for many but once you begin making more trips on foot or by bike, we think you'll be excited by how great it can ...

  9. Walking

    Inclusive walking. Greater Manchester has committed to making our active travel programme universally accessible, and we want to make sure that we remove all barriers to participation, whether physical or attitudinal. We work with a variety of partners to help provide equipment and resources so that anyone can join in.

  10. Active travel in Manchester: Council's new transport plan

    Manchester City Council has launched an ambitious active travel strategy as it aims to get far more residents to use alternatives to their cars to get from A to B, especially for short journeys in and around the city centre. The document sets down a number of goals, including making walking "the natural choice" for short trips and to double ...

  11. Active Travel

    Let's get moving! Whether it's a trip to the shops, the daily commute or the school run, Transport for Greater Manchester's active travel website has plenty of advice to help you make more journeys on foot or by bike. It's also the place for the latest news on Greater Manchester's ambitious plans for the UK's largest cycling and ...

  12. PDF Greater Manchester Interim Active Travel Design Guide

    Greater Manchester Cycling Design Guidance (2014), which should no longer be used. 8. The standards outlined in this Design Guide must be followed for Bee Network schemes, and any other active travel schemes funded, or part funded, by GMCA. District Highway Authorities are also recommended to follow them for all other active travel schemes.

  13. Active travel: local authority toolkit

    Implementing active travel: Greater Manchester. Using funding from the Cycle Cities Ambition programme, Greater Manchester built 3 miles of cycle lanes along one of the city's busiest bus routes ...

  14. Greater Manchester Active Travel Fund Schemes

    To support this, as part of an Active Travel Fund (ATF), Government has committed £2 billion to support the development of interventions to make safe spaces for cycling and walking. Greater Manchester has been awarded £15.97 million of this funding to deliver 24 miles of cycling and walking routes and dozens of new neighbourhood interventions.

  15. Agenda item

    Key points and themes within the report included: · The MATSIP aims to create a city-wide, Manchester-specific strategy and network plan for active travel investment and a prioritised pipeline of measures to deliver across the city; · Public and stakeholder engagement was carried out between July and December 2022, including online ...

  16. Local knowledge at the heart of Manchester's Active Travel Plans

    Local knowledge at the heart of Manchester's Active Travel Plans. Friday 21 October 2022. For several year Manchester City Council has been working to deliver changes to our highway network which make it easier for people to access Active Travel. Whether that is walking, wheeling or cycling, creating a network of safe and accessible active ...

  17. Charting a path to clean air: A community-centred approach to active

    Greater Manchester has amongst the worst air quality in the UK. Air pollution causes many health problems, as well as worsening pre-existing health conditions. Increasingly, Greater Manchester residents are concerned about poor air quality and want actions to be taken. ... Enhancing infrastructure for active travel therefore enables safe travel ...

  18. Cycling

    Help and guidance on riding a bike in Greater Manchester - Get free riding and maintenance training, find bike parking, plan a journey and find cycling routes, group rides and tips for all abilities. ... There are lots of resources available to help plan your next active travel journey. Explore a few options below: TfGM GM-wide map District ...

  19. Greater Manchester publishes first Active Travel Design Guide

    Transport for Greater Manchester and the region's Combined Authority have completed an important step in the implementation of their Bee Network walking and cycling plans, publishing an Active Travel Design Guide that sets out the key rules for designing future schemes in its ten boroughs.. The document is 27 pages (PDF) of perfect bedtime reading for anyone who dreams of protected cycle ...

  20. Trafford Council introduces new active travel measures on Talbot Road

    Trafford Council is totally committed to active travel and making the roads safer for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians alike. We are proud of the work we are carrying out and will continue to promote this type of environmentally-friendly travel throughout the borough.". Other parts of the Talbot Road scheme will be completed in early 2024.

  21. Chris Boardman named permanent National Active Travel Commissioner

    Over the past decade, the Olympian has been one of the country's most prominent active travel advocates and has served in Greater Manchester as Transport Commissioner and Walking and Cycling ...

  22. Active travel strategy public engagement

    Manchester City Council want to make walking, wheeling, and cycling more accessible and easier for everyone. That is why the Manchester Active Travel Strategy and Investment Plan is being prepared, to allow us to identify and prioritise improved walking, wheeling and cycling routes throughout the city.

  23. 2024 Local Beryl Tracker

    Track local tropical storms and hurricane activity near Manchester, NH, with AccuWeather's Localized Hurricane Tracker.

  24. Money blog: Pound flies after inflation news

    A limited-edition Wensleydale & Cranberry flavour crisps has been launched by Tyrells in collaboration with Wallace & Gromit. The crisps, priced at £2.75, are to launch on 22 July at the Co-op.

  25. City Centre Active Travel Scheme consultation

    The Active Travel Fund was established to support local transport authorities with improving cycling and walking facilities. The funding was originally announced by the Secretary of State on 23 May 2020 as part of the work to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, and aims to help people to get to their destination safely and quickly, while helping ...