Blog Government Digital Service

https://gds.blog.gov.uk/2014/09/15/you-can-now-book-a-prison-visit-online/

You can now book a prison visit online

You can now book a prison visit online

Booking a prison visit should be simple and straightforward. Until now that was far from the case. Booking a visit required both prisoner and visitor to jump through hoops: paper forms and drawn-out phone calls. And if the visit date turned out to be impossible, they had to start all over again.

Now you can book a visit online . It takes about 5 minutes. Before, picking an available date was pot luck. Now there's a date-picker that lets you select 3 possible slots instead of 1. It’s a straight-forward service with user-needs at its heart but, if you get stuck, you can call the prison's visits booking line and someone will help you with the booking.

Here's a very short film we've made about it:

By making it easier to book visits, prisoners will see more of their friends and family. Evidence suggests this will help their rehabilitation. Transformation isn't just about websites.

The service was built by the Ministry of Justice, with a combined team from the National Offender Management Service, HM Prison Service and MoJ Digital Services.

For more of the story behind this service, read Mike Bracken's account of his trip to HMP Rochester or check out the service’s transformation page .

Join the conversation on Twitter , and don't forget to sign up for email alerts .

You may also be interested in:

  • Prison visit booking: using digital analytics to inform alpha development
  • Making prison visits easier to book
  • Meet the Transformation team

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Share this page, 20 comments.

Comment by Pauline posted on 23 August 2015

How do you find out the prisoners number??? so you can go ahead with online booking of a visit?

Comment by Carrie Barclay posted on 24 August 2015

You can find a prisoner using this service: https://www.gov.uk/find-prisoner However it will be the prisoner's responsibility to get in touch with you to let you know their prison number etc.

Comment by linda posted on 15 August 2015

This service does not appear to work this is day 2 trying to use it

Comment by Olivia posted on 30 July 2015

Hi, If a visit is booked and someone cant make it, is it possible to change the name of one of the people to someone else?

Comment by Louise Duffy posted on 30 July 2015

It's best to contact the prison directly if this happens. You can find contact details here: http://www.justice.gov.uk/contacts/prison-finder

Thanks, Louise

Comment by Paige posted on 28 July 2015

Hi my partner was sent to nottingham today, I was on his previous list 4 months ago for a visit. Will that still be on the system all will it have to he put through again if so how long does it take to be approved for a visit? Thanks Paige.

Comment by Louise Duffy posted on 29 July 2015

You might want to get in touch with the prison first before booking a visit. You can find the contact details of the prison here: http://www.justice.gov.uk/contacts/prison-finder

Comment by Debs posted on 27 July 2015

Hello Is there a list of prisons where online booking can't be used?

Comment by Louise Duffy posted on 28 July 2015

According to the information on this page: https://www.gov.uk/prison-visits , you can arrange a visit to any prison in England and Wales through this service. If you're visiting someone in Northern Ireland or Scotland you'll need to contact the prison directly.

This link also lists the type of visits that are not covered by the online service: https://www.gov.uk/prison-visits so you need to get in touch with the prison directly.

Hope that's helpful.

Comment by c.steer posted on 26 July 2015

So how do I find the booking form to fill in I am new to computers

Comment by Louise Duffy posted on 27 July 2015

Here's the link to the booking form: https://www.gov.uk/prison-visits

You'll need this information to complete the form:

prisoner number prisoner’s date of birth dates of birth for all visitors coming with you make sure the person you’re visiting has added you to their visitor list

Hope that's useful.

Comment by Shawnaa posted on 09 May 2015

i have a visit booked which i did online but i do not have a visiting order woll the prison let me in?

Comment by Carrie Barclay posted on 11 May 2015

Your identity will be checked on arrival to make sure you’re on the visitor list.

Comment by jessicca posted on 27 January 2015

What happens after you book the visit and its confirmed by email do you need the visiting order ?

Comment by Carrie Barclay posted on 29 January 2015

The Visiting Order (VO) number is generated by the booking system, it is included in your confirmation email and you will need this to change or cancel a booking.

However, if you're visiting a prison the guidance is that you only need your ID, not the VO number. If when you visit the prison you are asked for the VO number you should report this via the Contact Us link on the Prison Visits Booking form.

I hope that helps.

Comment by Ilysa Mcnally posted on 18 November 2014

How late in advance can I book e.g. book a visit today (Tuesday) for the Sunday coming???

Comment by Carrie Barclay posted on 19 November 2014

Hi Ilysa. Thanks for your question. A visit needs to be booked 3 working days in advance. So in this case, the visit request would have to be no later than Tuesday to allow for a visit on Sunday.

Comment by carole posted on 23 October 2014

How far in advance can you book visits

Comment by Carrie Barclay posted on 23 October 2014

Hi Carole. You can book up to 28 days in advance. Thanks for your question.

Comment by kimberly posted on 16 August 2015

does anyone know how to cancel a visit online?

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Hmp brixton.

  • Inside Time Reports
  • 13th December 2014
  • Category B , Greater London , Male Cat. C , Prison Visit

Prison information

Address: Jebb Avenue Brixton SW2 5XF Switchboard: 020 8588 6000 Managed by: HMPPS Region: London Category: Male Cat. C Link to: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/brixton-prison

Description

Brixton has been recategorised as a category ‘C’ prison. It is now a resettlement prison and houses a mixture of category ‘C’ and ‘D’ prisoner

Visit Booking: Online

Use this online service to book a social visit to a prisoner in England or Wales you need the:

  • prisoner number
  • prisoner’s date of birth
  • dates of birth for all visitors coming with you

The prisoner must add you to their visitor list before you can book a visit.

You’ll get an email confirming your visit. It takes 1 to 3 days.

ID: Every visit Children’s Visits:

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Pioneering debt advice scheme at brixton prison, the inspector calls, relaunch for best-known prison bakery, “brixton has improved since inspectors came”, 48 songs: how music saved my life, ‘i had a big desire to keep myself fit’ , 1 in 12 prisoners had covid, the intro returns to national prison radio, prisons: the good, the bad and the ugly, something missing or outdated.

If you have any information that you would like to be included or see anything that needs updating, contact Gary Bultitude at  [email protected]

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  • Category C - NEW
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  • 24th January 2017

HMYOI WARREN HILL

  • 4th January 2015

One thought on “ HMP BRIXTON ”

RE: Sending pocket money I cannot find any information about sending pocket money to my son in Brixton Prison. Is this permissable and if so, who do I make the cheque payable to please. At his former prison, I used to make the cheques payable to the NOMS Agency directed to the Governor. I would be extremely grateful for any response. With thanks. MM

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A guide to hmp brixton.

brixton prison visit request

The prospect of going to prison is a difficult one. To help you navigate this complex process, we’ve put together a comprehensive guide that covers everything from the HMP Brixton’s type and location to its transportation options. We’ll also explain what happens when a prisoner first arrives and provide tips for those planning to visit. With this information, you’ll have a better understanding of what to expect and how to manage this difficult time.

What type of prison is HMP Brixton?

Situated in Brixton, London, England, HMP Brixton is a Category C men’s public prison and Young Offenders Institution. The facility, which is managed by His Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service, houses 798 male prisoners, primarily convicted by local courts. Prisoners are provided with healthcare, education, sports, and religious amenities.

How to get to HMP Brixton

HMP Brixton is located at Jebb Ave, Brixton, London, SW2 5XF. You can drive to the prison or use public transport (a short walk may be required, depending on the route). Several bus and coach routes pass near the prison and Southern rail services are also proximate.

What happens when you first go to prison as a prisoner?

The prospect of entering prison for the first time can be daunting, and it’s normal to feel anxious and uncertain about what to expect. However, having some knowledge of what happens during the initial stages can help alleviate some of your concerns.

The first stage of the process is known as “reception” where you’ll be formally inducted into the prison system. The primary purpose is to gather information about you, including your needs and any potential risks you may pose. This information will be used to determine your accommodation and other necessary services.

During the reception process, you’ll undergo a health screening to identify any immediate medical concerns. You’ll also be thoroughly searched to ensure that you’re not carrying any prohibited items, and your personal belongings will be checked and recorded. You’ll receive information about the prison’s rules and regulations, daily routines, and available services and programs.

Once the reception process is complete, you’ll be assigned to a specific wing or unit within the prison. You’ll receive basic hygiene items, bedding, and a cell. If you have a cellmate, you’ll be introduced to them at this point.

Although entering prison can be overwhelming, having an idea of what to expect during the initial stages can help reduce your anxiety and provide some reassurance.

What happens when you visit someone in prison?

Visiting a prisoner in England involves a set of procedures designed to ensure the safety and security of all parties.

To visit a prisoner, you must schedule your visit in advance and provide photographic identification upon arrival. Upon arrival, you’ll undergo a security check that may include a check of your body, clothes, and bags. Children may also be searched for security purposes.

After passing the security check, you’ll wait until your visit is scheduled. You’ll then be escorted to a visiting room to see the prisoner. The visiting room may have a screen or glass partition or be an open room with several tables, depending on the prison’s rules. The staff may conduct a search of your body, clothes, and belongings before entering the visiting room.

Once your visit is over, you’ll need to check out and may be subject to another security check to ensure that you are not taking anything out of the prison on behalf of the prisoner. This security check may involve an X-ray machine, metal detector, or a more thorough search of your person and belongings.

If you have concerns or questions about what is permitted during your visit to HMP Brixton, it’s best to contact the prison directly for more information about their visitation policies and procedures.

Where to get more help

If you’re worried about legal rights and potential appeals for yourself or a loved one at HMP Brixton, Stuart Miller Solicitors can help. We understand the complexities and politics of incarceration and offer a free consultation to assist you. Contact our team today to learn more.

OUR COMMITMENTS TO YOU:

A legal expert will consult you within 24 hours of making an enquiry.

We will always treat you with trust, understanding and respect.

Specialised

Your case will be handled by an expert who specialises in your type of offence.

We will take early action to end proceedings as soon as it is practically and legally possible to do so.

You will be kept updated on your case at all times. We will provide a named contact available to answer your questions.

We understand this is a difficult and stressful time for you and your family. Our team will support you every step of the way.

We will never give up on your case. We fight tirelessly to get you the best possible outcome.

Davut Bilgen

Further Reading

brixton prison visit request

A Guide to Highbury Magistrates’ Court

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A Guide To HMP Buckley Hall

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Blog Justice Digital

https://mojdigital.blog.gov.uk/2014/04/11/handling-prison-visit-requests-the-inside-story/

Handling prison visit requests: the inside story

HMP/YOI Rochester

We asked Peter Hickey, Head of Operations at HMP/YOI Rochester to give us the low-down on what it was like to be one of the first prisons in England and Wales to use the new online prison visits request service. This is what he told us.

Doing things in a new way

“Previously our visit booking systems were paper-based which made for a lot of extra work,” Peter explains. “We understood the need for change, not least because HM Prison Service needs to improve efficiency and make savings where possible.”

“But the biggest challenge to using the new service was overcoming resistance to change, for everyone: prison staff, prisoners and visitors. There’s an emotional attachment to the way things have always been done. It’s hard for people to let go of the past, and take on a new way of doing things, especially when, as far as they can see, the existing system is working very well.”

“It’s really important that the new system produces results that are immediately apparent, in order to win people over, to win hearts and minds.”

A gradual transition

HMP/YOI Rochester ran the new service in tandem with the existing paper-based system for the first month.

“It was important that we made the transition gradually to give everyone a chance to get used to the new way of doing things,” Peter explains. “The biggest change was getting rid of paper Visiting Orders (VOs). In the old way of doing things, prisoners used to have to complete these and send them to visitors so that they could book a visit.”

“In the new service, the visitor can simply go online and request a visit - as long as they are on the prisoner’s approved visiting list.”

Word of mouth endorsement

“It’s really important to have buy-in from the top - at Prison Governor level - in order for any new service to succeed,” explains Peter.

“But alongside that, it’s important that people can see for themselves that the new way of doing things is working. Especially in an environment like prison which is like a village or a small town. Obviously there are the official channels of advice and communication, but there’s also a lot of word-of-mouth chat, like people recommending things over the garden fence.

“For example one prisoner saying to another ‘it was much faster for me.’ It’s that kind of endorsement you need in order for a new system to succeed.”

Booking staff enjoy greater flexibility

As well as being available to visitors 24/7, the new service has also brought significant benefits to booking staff.

“Moving to dealing with the majority of visit requests by email gives booking staff far more flexibility. For example, if a large number of requests have come in, too many to be dealt with in daytime working hours, then clearing the backlog can be assigned to night staff,” says Peter.

“Not having to be physically present to answer phone calls within a certain time frame frees staff up to prioritise workloads.”

A visit from Paul Shetler and Mike Bracken: looking to the future  

In March 2014 Peter hosted a visit to HMP /YOI Rochester by Paul Shetler, Chief Digital Officer, Ministry of Justice and Mike Bracken, Executive Director (Digital), Cabinet Office.

“Both Paul and Mike had a good understanding of the kinds of challenges we face, particularly in terms of security. I think they could see that we’ve made a strong commitment to the ‘digital agenda’. We had a good exchange of ideas about potential digital projects for the future. It was quite inspiring.”

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Inside Look: Life and Conditions at Brixton Prison

Welcome to a rare inside look at Brixton Prison. Based in south London, this adult male prison has been functional since 1819. From its architecture to daily life, this page will give you an insight into the realities of Brixton.

Historical Background:

Brixton Prison, with its distinctive red brick walls, was originally built as the Surrey House of Correction in 1819. It’s amongst the oldest prisons in London, and throughout its long history, it has served different functions, from a correctional facility for young offenders to a military prison. Today it holds adult males, primarily from Derby Crown Court.

Physical Layout:

On entry, you’ll note the prison is divided into six wings – A, B, C, D, E, and F. Each wing houses prisoners according to their requirements. The E wing, for example, was announced as the UK’s first ‘prison-based social enterprise’ in 2011 and facilitates training and employment opportunities.

Daily Life:

Keeping in line with human rights standards, prisoners at Brixton enjoy privileges like access to meals, healthcare, educational opportunities, and visits from loved ones. Regulations vary from one individual to another, so it’s always essential to confirm with prison authorities.

  • Meals: Prisoners are entitled to three meals a day, including a hot meal.
  • Healthcare: A healthcare centre is on-site, offering both physical and mental health services.
  • Education and Work: Regular work and learning opportunities are made available via prison workshops or the onsite library.
  • Visits: Family visits are critically important for prisoner wellbeing, so the prison encourages families to visit routinely.

Facilities:

Aside from basic needs, Brixton Prison also has various additional facilities. A gym, a chapel, and a garden for prisoners who wish to engage in gardening are among these. There’s also an Advice and Guidance Team, which provides support with benefits, housing, and employment for prisoners who are preparing to re-enter society.

Reformation Programs:

The core goal of Brixton Prison is more than punishment; it’s about reformation. Several programs are thus put in place to prepare prisoners for a life outside prison walls. These range from drug rehabilitation programs to vocational learning such as barista courses and stone masonry.

In Conclusion:

Brixton Prison isn’t simply a place where convicts serve time. In keeping with the broader ethos of UK penal policy, it aims to be a space where inmates can engage in constructive activities, develop new skills, and prepare for a better life post-prison. Remember, each prisoner’s experience varies, and the privileges and restrictions applicable to each individual may differ.

Now that you’ve gotten a sneak peek, we hope it helps you understand a little more about life in Brixton Prison.

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General Information, HMP Brixton

HMP Brixton opened in 1819 as the Surrey House of Correction and had fulfilled many roles since that time, being both a prison for women, and then a military prison. In 1898 it became an adult male local prison, serving the whole of the London area and particularly focusing on South London, however in July 2012, it was re-roled again, becoming a category C and D resettlement prison for the local area, but in February 2017 its role became that of a Cat C resettlement prison..  The prison holds a large population of sexual offenders.

  • 660 new prisoners received each year (an average of 55 per month).
  • 215 prisoners convicted of a sexual offence.
  • 51 foreign national prisoners.
  • 49% of prisoners are from a black and minority ethnic background.
  • An average of 74 prisoners is released into the community each month.
  • 267 prisoners are receiving support for substance misuse.

Accommodation

  • A wing: category C prisoners, including 34 prisoners on the London Pathways Unit (for prisoners with personality disorders)
  • B wing: first night/induction accommodation for category C prisoners
  • C wing: enhanced prisoners
  • D wing: drug recovery and well-being wing
  • G wing: prisoners convicted of a sexual offence
  • Segregation unit

Return to Brixton

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The Prison Radio Association uses sound to change lives.

From our studios in Styal and Brixton prisons, we record and broadcast stories into prison cells across the country.

We run National Prison Radio, the world’s first national radio station for people in prison, and the Prison Radio Podcast Network for people outside prison.

We unearth talent behind bars and support people into training and employment in the production sector. And through Prison Radio International, we lead the global prison radio movement.

PRISON RADIO LAUNCHES IN HMP FELTHAM

PRISON RADIO LAUNCHES IN HMP FELTHAM

HMYOI Feltham experienced a rise in incidences of self-harm and suicides amongst young men in prison. The governor was approached by two local residents, Roma Hooper and Mark Robinson, with the idea of setting up a radio station designed to keep listeners company at night when they are at their most vulnerable. Europe’s first prison radio station was established with the launch of Radio Feltham.

PRISON RADIO ASSOCIATION IS ESTABLISHED AS A CHARITY

PRISON RADIO ASSOCIATION IS ESTABLISHED AS A CHARITY

In response to a growing demand from prisons to engage with prison radio, the Prison Radio Association was set up, with Phil Maguire as its founding Chief Executive. It continues to offer guidance and expertise to prisons interested in setting up and running their own radio projects.

ELECTRIC RADIO BRIXTON

ELECTRIC RADIO BRIXTON

The governor of HMP Brixton, Paul McDowell, invited the charity to set up and run a radio station in the prison. Electric Radio Brixton was launched, broadcasting programmes made by prisoners directly into the cells. Bobby Friction, Billy Bragg and Mick Jones from The Clash were among the first voices to be heard on-air, alongside men serving sentences in Brixton prison.

UK’S FIRST PRISON RADIO CONFERENCE

UK’S FIRST PRISON RADIO CONFERENCE

The PRA ran a residential conference for prison radio practitioners at the University of Warwick, offering sessions on how to make the right editorial decisions in a prison setting, practical programme-making skills, as well as the chance to share best practice with colleagues from different prison radio projects

NATIONAL PRISON RADIO LAUNCHES

NATIONAL PRISON RADIO LAUNCHES

Electric Radio Brixton re-launched as National Prison Radio, extending its reach to prison right across England and Wales. It was the world’s first national radio service for prisoners. It broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week via in-cell TV. This came as Electric Radio Brixton beats the biggest radio networks in the country to win four coveted Sony Radio Academy Awards – the first of many industry award successes.

PORRIDGE FOR BREAKFAST

PORRIDGE FOR BREAKFAST

The PRA started production at HMP Styal, working with women in the prison to produce programmes for National Prison Radio. National Prison Radio launched its daily breakfast show, Porridge, which aimed to give prisoners a soundtrack to create a positive state of mind. Porridge received a nomination for Breakfast Show of the Year at the Sony Awards in 2012.

FACE TO FACE

FACE TO FACE

The PRA produced Face to Face, a ground-breaking programme produced in partnership with the charity Victim Support. Broadcast on National Prison Radio and BBC Radio 4, it aimed to promote a better understanding of the impact of crime on victims, and on society as a whole. The project won a Sony Gold Award in 2012, and the Charity Partnership of the Year award at the 2012 Third Sector Awards.

RISE MAXIMUM RADIO

RISE MAXIMUM RADIO

The PRA supported the launch of Rise Maximum Radio inside the maximum security prison in Trinidad and Tobago. PRA Chief Executive Phil Maguire presents a programme for the BBC World Service about the launch. The founders were inspired to develop the station after their visit to National Prison Radio in the UK. Meanwhile, National Prison Radio increased its Request Show to two hours a day, to cater for the increasing number of song requests received from prisoners and their families. It won Station of the Year at the 2012 Radio Academy Nations and Regions Awards.

PRA PRODUCES SERIES ON HISTORY OF BRIXTON PRISON FOR BBC RADIO 4

PRA PRODUCES SERIES ON HISTORY OF BRIXTON PRISON FOR BBC RADIO 4

London’s Oldest Prison saw historian Jerry White visit HMP Brixton to talk to prisoners and staff about the changes that have taken place in criminal justice over the past 200 years. The PRA also created a monthly podcast for Phoenix Futures and was commissioned to produce content for the Samaritans, the Department for Work and Pensions, Staffordshire County Council, London Probation Trust and the BBC among many others. National Prison Radio was nominated as a Station of the Year at the 2013 Sony Radio Academy Awards

NATIONAL PRISON RADIO BROADCASTS SPECIAL SHOWS FROM PSYCHOLOGICAL CARE UNITS

NATIONAL PRISON RADIO BROADCASTS SPECIAL SHOWS FROM PSYCHOLOGICAL CARE UNITS

PRA producers visited Gartree, Send and Frankland prisons, as well as Kirk Lodge Approved Premises to make a very special series of programmes from the Psychologically Informed Planned Environments, or PIPEs units. These were the first of dozens of specialist programmes produced in partnership with prison staff to provide support to listeners with particular needs, with the aim of creating an inclusive and wide-ranging radio service with a purpose.

GEORGE THE POET JOINS NATIONAL PRISON RADIO

GEORGE THE POET JOINS NATIONAL PRISON RADIO

PRA Patron George the Poet made his National Prison Radio debut with a special programme for Black History Month. He has gone on to present a returning series called George’s Yard, in which he talks music, lyrics, portrayal and storytelling with National Prison Radio’s presenters.

PRA WINS ROSE D’OR AND CHARITY OF THE YEAR

PRA WINS ROSE D’OR AND CHARITY OF THE YEAR

The PRA produced a powerful documentary for BBC Radio 4 called The Abuse Trial, in which the journalist David Nolan told the inside story of the biggest historical sex abuse case ever mounted by Greater Manchester Police. David had been a victim of Alan Morris, who was convicted at the end of the trial. The programme won the international Rose D’Or prize for audio storytelling. Alongside this, we were also named Charity of the Year at the Third Sector Awards

PRA NAMED PRODUCTION COMPANY OF THE YEAR

PRA NAMED PRODUCTION COMPANY OF THE YEAR

The PRA was proud and delighted to be named Production Company of the Year by Audio UK, the industry body that supports the audio production sector, for championing the use of audio to change lives. We hired our first Employment and Training Manager to formalise the support we give to people in prison and support people into the wider broadcast industry.

PRA RADIO DRAMA WINS GOLD AT ARIAS

PRA RADIO DRAMA WINS GOLD AT ARIAS

Producer Katie Bilboa and writer and star Carl Cattermole teamed up to produce an innovative drama, Double Bubble, as part of a campaign to raise awareness of the dangers posed by loan sharks. Debt can be hugely damaging for people in prison, who are often vulnerable to exploitation by unlicensed lenders. Carl Cattermole had spent time behind bars himself and wrote the drama based on things he’d seen himself on prison wings. It won gold at the 2018 ARIAS, the Oscars of the radio world.

THE SECRET LIFE OF PRISONS PODCAST LAUNCHES

THE SECRET LIFE OF PRISONS PODCAST LAUNCHES

The charity launched The Secret Life of Prisons, our flagship podcast presented by PRA Chief Executive Phil Maguire and the Prison Reform Trust’s Paula Harriott. The first four episodes chart the typical journey through prison. Subsequent series aim to illuminate one of the darkest and most mysterious corners of society

NATIONAL PRISON RADIO BECOMES A LIFELINE TO THOUSANDS

NATIONAL PRISON RADIO BECOMES A LIFELINE TO THOUSANDS

As the Covid-19 pandemic forced staff and organisations out of prisons, National Prison Radio continued broadcasting, providing vital information and updates to people locked in their cells for up to 23 hours per day. Secretary of State for Justice Robert Buckland requested an interview slot to update people on the situation, while senior staff from HM Prison and Probation Service answered our listeners’ questions every week.

PRA HOSTS BIGGEST-EVER-GET-TOGETHER OF PRISON RADIO PROJECTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

PRA HOSTS BIGGEST-EVER-GET-TOGETHER OF PRISON RADIO PROJECTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

An International Prison Radio Conference brought together representatives from 12 countries on four different continents to share their stories, experience and practice of prison radio. It led to the publication of the first International Prison Radio Impact Report.

PRA LAUNCHES THE LIFE AFTER PRISON PODCAST

PRA LAUNCHES THE LIFE AFTER PRISON PODCAST

In October 2022, we launched the Life After Prison podcast - the UK's first podcast by prison leavers, for prison leavers. Presented by ex-prisoners Zak and Jules, Life After Prison ensures that the 65,000 people released from UK prisons each year can continue to engage with our rehabilitative audio content.

PRA LAUNCHES A POST-RELEASE TALENT DEVELOPMENT SCHEME

PRA LAUNCHES A POST-RELEASE TALENT DEVELOPMENT SCHEME

In 2023, we formalised our post-release offer for talented radio presenters and producers leaving prison. We now offer opportunities for people to continue professionally developing alongside our experienced producers, while building their portfolios and exploring pathways into further employment and education in the broadcasting sector.

FREE FLOW WINS GOLD AT THE ARIAS

FREE FLOW WINS GOLD AT THE ARIAS

In May 2024, Free Flow was crowned Best Specialist Music Show at the 2024 ARIAS – the Oscars of the radio industry. Free Flow is hosted by the poet Lady Unchained. She plays instrumentals to National Prison Radio listeners, encouraging them to write and perform lyrics along to the music. Listeners then call National Prison Radio’s freephone voicemail to record their bars, and Lady Unchained gives feedback and encouragement.It’s slogan recognised amongst its listeners is:“It’s the show where we play the beat twice so you can get your bars right.”

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Catalogue description PRISONS AND PRISONERS: Brixton Prison

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What is the dress code for Brixton visit?

What is the number for hmp brixton visiting, what happened to bad boy bakery, can you send clothes to a prisoner uk, what category is hmp belmarsh, what to wear while visiting london (women + men).

What is the top 10 worst prisons in UK?

  • Ten men's prisons – Bedford, Brixton, Chelmsford, Forest Bank, Pentonville, Swaleside, Wandsworth, Wayland, Winchester and Woodhill.
  • Three male young offender institutions – Aylesbury, Deerbolt, Werrington.

What are B category prisons UK?

How much money do prisoners get when released uk, what happens to your bank account when you go to jail uk, how do prisoners wash their clothes uk, what happened to prisoners in gordon behind bars, did gordon ramsay hire kieron tarff, can i visit a random prisoner, can i phone a prisoner uk, how do i prepare myself for jail uk, what time do prisoners go to bed in uk, how much money can you send to prisoners uk, what happens to your bills when you go to jail uk, how much gate money do prisoners get when released, how much money should you send a prisoner, do you go straight to jail after sentencing uk, how do prisoners get home after being released uk, what are prisoners allowed to have in jail uk.

  • List of items allowed in Prisons, Open-type Prisons and Detention Centres. attached to prisons. ...
  • - perfume and eau-de-Cologne in their fabric packaging - up to 150 ml, in. ...
  • - electrical connector block with up to 3 nests and up to 3 metres cable - ...
  • Food products which can be kept at designated places specified by the prison.

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What is the dress code for Brixton visit?

geographic-faq

As a pilot, I often have the opportunity to visit different places during layovers, and Brixton is one of them. When visiting Brixton Prison, it is important to adhere to their strict dress code policy. Visitors should dress appropriately to ensure entry into the prison. Wearing items such as vests, low-cut tops, high-cut shorts or dresses, ripped jeans, flip-flops, or inappropriate headwear could result in being turned away. It is important to note that headwear worn for religious reasons is allowed.

What is the number for HMP Brixton visiting?

If you have made a booking for a visit to HMP Brixton and haven’t received a confirmation email after 3 days, you can call the prison directly at 020 8678 1433. The phone lines are manned from 13:30 to 16:30 on weekdays. You can also make new bookings by calling this number. It is important to remember that visits can only be booked up to 28 days in advance.

What happened to Bad Boy Bakery?

Bad Boy Bakery was featured in the television series “Gordon Behind Bars” and gained attention when it was visited by the former Justice Secretary, Ken Clarke. However, the bakery was later taken over by a training provider called Novus. Unfortunately, the bakery eventually ceased trading. The ovens and equipment inside the prison have remained unused for the past few years.

Can you send clothes to a prisoner in the UK?

Generally, items other than books cannot be handed in or sent in by families or friends to convicted prisoners, unless there are exceptional circumstances. The decision to allow clothing to be sent to prisoners is at the discretion of the Governor. In some cases, prisoners may be allowed to receive clothing if there is a need to replace it due to restricted access to laundry facilities.

What category is HMP Belmarsh?

HMP Belmarsh is categorized as a Category A prison in the UK. It houses some of the country’s most dangerous and high-profile criminals. The prison is considered one of the most secure in the UK and is often used to hold prisoners involved in cases where national security is threatened. Security measures are crucial in keeping the prison safe and secure.

What to Wear While Visiting London (Women + Men)

As a pilot, I often have the opportunity to visit different cities, including London. When visiting London, whether you are a man or a woman, it is important to dress appropriately for the occasion. London is known for its diverse fashion scene, and you can choose to dress casually or formally, depending on your plans. However, it is always a good idea to dress smartly and comfortably, especially if you are exploring the city on foot.

What are B category prisons UK?

In the UK, B category prisons fall into two categories: local prisons and training prisons. Local prisons are designed to house prisoners who are taken directly from court in the local area, whether they are sentenced or on remand. Training prisons, on the other hand, are specifically designed to hold long-term and high-security prisoners. Both types of prisons serve different purposes within the UK’s prison system.

How much money do prisoners get when released in the UK?

When prisoners are released in the UK, they are often provided with some financial support to help them reintegrate into society. On the day of release, most prisoners receive a travel warrant or tickets to assist them in their journey. They also receive an £82.39 cash payment, which is commonly referred to as a prison discharge grant. This monetary support can help individuals cover immediate expenses as they transition back into the community.

What happens to your bank account when you go to jail in the UK?

When you go to jail in the UK, any bank cards, PINs, and cheque books must be kept in your valuable property. However, if you have taken out a Third Party Mandate, it may be best to give these items to the holder of the mandate. You generally will not need to access your bank account while in prison, but there may be occasions when you need to send cheques.

How do prisoners wash their clothes in the UK?

In UK prisons, there are various ways for prisoners to wash their clothes. Sometimes, it is a free-for-all where prisoners take care of their laundry themselves. In other cases, orderlies are responsible for doing the laundry. Some prisoners may choose to do their laundry in the cell sink or in the cell shower if they have access to these facilities. However, there may be limited drying facilities available, which can pose a challenge.

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Steve Bannon asks appeals court to allow him to remain out of prison while he fights contempt of Congress conviction

Former White House strategist Steve Bannon, accompanied by his attorneys David Schoen, left and M. Evan Corcoran, right, speaks with the media  departs federal court, Friday, July 22, 2022, in Washington. Bannon, a longtime ally of former President Donald Trump has been convicted of contempt charges for defying a congressional subpoena from the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.  (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Former Trump adviser Steve Bannon asked a federal appeals court Tuesday to let him r emain out of pr ison while he continues to appeal a nearly two-year-old conviction on criminal contempt of Congress charges.

Bannon filed an emergency motion Tuesday evening asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to overrule a lower court’s order last week that he report to prison for four months on July 1.

Bannon is asking the D.C. Circuit to quickly rule on his motion — by next Tuesday — to allow him time if necessary to appeal to the Supreme Court over his conviction on two counts of contempt of Congress in 2022, after he refused to answer questions from the House Jan. 6 committee.

Bannon's attorney argued in Tuesday's filing that his imprisonment would block him from acting as a "meaningful adviser" in the campaign leading up to the November election.

"The government seeks to imprison Mr. Bannon for the four-month period leading up to the November election, when millions of Americans look to him for information on important campaign issues," wrote Trent McCotter, a new addition to Bannon’s legal team. "This would also effectively bar Mr. Bannon from serving as a meaningful advisor in the ongoing national campaign.”

A three-judge panel of the D.C. Circuit last month upheld Bannon's contempt of Congress conviction , prompting the trial judge who presided over Bannon’s case to rule that he must report to prison at the end of the month.

U.S. District Judge Carl Nichols, an appointee of former President Donald Trump, said last week that the “original basis” for his stay of the imposition of Bannon’s sentence no longer applied after an appeals court upheld the conviction.

Nichols had allowed Bannon to remain out of prison while he pursued that appeal.

Bannon’s lawyers have said they intend to ask the full bench of the D.C. Circuit to review his appeal and that he should not be required to report to prison until all avenues of appeal have been exhausted.

A prosecutor from the U.S. attorney's office for Washington, D.C., which sought to lift a stay of Bannon's sentence pending appeal, did not immediately respond to a request for comment Tuesday night.

Bannon was sentenced  to four months in prison, the same sentence  former Trump adviser Peter Navarro is serving . Navarro also battled to stay out of prison following his conviction on contempt of Congress charges.

Navarro took his emergency appeal to the Supreme Court, where it was rejected first by Chief Justice John Roberts and a second time by the full court. He is serving his four-month sentence at a federal prison in Miami.

Daniel Barnes reports for NBC News, based in Washington.

Zoë Richards is the evening politics reporter for NBC News.

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brixton prison visit request

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  • Crime, justice and law
  • Prisons and probation

Brixton Prison: Action plan

HM Prison and Probation Service action plan for Brixton Prison in response to HM Inspectorate of Prisons inspection.

Brixton Prison: Action plan (June 2019)

PDF , 525 KB , 15 pages

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.

Brixton Prison: IRP response letter

PDF , 144 KB , 2 pages

This action plan is the HMPPS and MoJ response to the HM Inspectorate of Prisons inspection report for Brixton Prison .

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EPL

Jamie Lawrence: From prison to the Premier League and beyond

Jamie Lawrence: From prison to the Premier League and beyond

Jamie Lawrence shakes his head in bemusement, almost as if he can’t believe what he’s about to say.

“We’ve been talking to a company in Soho about a film covering my life. There’s been quite a few meetings and they seem keen. If that gets off the ground, it’ll be the icing on the cake.”

We’re sitting at a table in Boxpark, Croydon. Lawrence’s incredulity at his life story possibly hitting the big screen is perhaps understandable. This isn’t what usually happens to guys where he’s from in south London. And especially not those jailed twice for robbery before the age of 22.

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Lawrence’s story, however, is no ordinary one. Sent to prison for three years as a teenager, he’d only been out for three months when he fell foul of the law again in May 1991.

A four-year sentence followed for violent robbery and Lawrence’s life seemed mapped out. Then, though, came a move to the tough HMP Camp Hill on the Isle of Wight and a gradual realisation that football may yet be his salvation.

Thanks to an extraordinary leap of faith on the part of the prison authorities, he was allowed to play for local team Cowes Sports on day release.

“There was no security,” he recalls. “I’d get let out at 10am on a Saturday if the match was on the mainland, play the game and then be back inside by evening. If I had a Guinness or three, the lads would give me mints and chewing gum to hide the smell before dropping me off at the prison.”

A successful trial at Sunderland when out on parole led to a one-year contract offer from manager Terry Butcher, the former England international. His professional debut followed a few weeks later against Middlesbrough , live on ITV. ‘Jailhouse Rock’ was mischievously played over the Ayresome Park PA system before kick-off.

Seventeen months after his release from prison, Lawrence was making his Premier League debut for Leicester City , with whom he would later win the League Cup in 1997. Another stint in the top flight followed with Bradford City, plus more than 40 international appearances for Jamaica. No wonder a film of his extraordinary life is potentially in the pipeline.

brixton prison visit request

“My first two games in the Premier League were against Crystal Palace and Manchester City ,” says the 54-year-old, who, as well as being Zambia’s fitness coach under manager Avram Grant, visits prisons to mentor inmates and runs his own football academy.

“There was a big fuss in the papers. It had been the same up at Sunderland, headlines like ‘Escape to Victory’ and all that. But I didn’t mind. I’ve never hidden from my past.

“People make mistakes, day in and day out. I just hope people look at me as an example of how you get yourself out of it.”

Lawrence grew up loving sport in his native Battersea. And not just football, which he played twice on a Saturday and then again on a Sunday.

“I loved my cricket,” he says. “I was an opening bowler and opening batsman and even had trials for Surrey. I’d go to Test matches on my own, always at the Oval and sometimes Lord’s, too.

“The West Indies were the best team back then and my idol was Viv Richards, who played with a real swagger and never wore a helmet. I dropped myself down to No 3 in the batting order to be like Viv!”

Life started taking a turn for the worse at the age of 17 when parents Elfreda and Dudley returned to Jamaica. He opted to stay, moving in with his sister in Croydon. Money was tight and crime seemed an easy way of paying the bills.

Things went steadily downhill from there, culminating in that first prison sentence after robbing a snooker hall. “Everyone talks about ‘falling in with the wrong crowd’ and things like that,” he says. “But I don’t buy into that. If anything, I was probably the wrong crowd myself. The bottom line is everyone has decisions to make. My problem is I made the wrong ones.

“My first time inside wasn’t hard, if I’m honest. I had a welcoming committee of all my mates when I went into Brixton (the south London prison). I knew everyone. I was a model prisoner, even getting parole first time.

“But I then got arrested again. I got four years this time on the Isle of Wight. And this was a big man’s prison, a real violent place. I knew I’d have to stand up for myself.

“This one day, I put my name up for the phone and this guy comes up and rubs it off. He’d been in there about a year and I later found out he was the wing bully. Anyway, I challenged him and he said, ‘Shut up or I’ll do you’. Knowing I couldn’t back down, I said, ‘Let’s have it then’.

“We went into this room and I ended up knocking him out. I broke my hand, you can still see the scar now. When he came round, he grassed me up. Though it probably didn’t take much working out, as they found him knocked out and me with a broken hand!

“I got seven days solitary, but he was shipped out for grassing me up. Then football came along.”

brixton prison visit request

Lawrence’s big break came via the prison’s traditional Boxing Day meeting between their own team and Cowes Sports. He scored twice, including the winner, to prompt an unusual request from the Cowes manager to the prison’s physical training instructor, Eddie Walder.

“They asked if I could play for them every week,” he recalls. “I was only a year into my sentence so thought, ‘No chance, you lot is chatting sh**’. But they made it happen.

“I owe Mr Walder and the (prison) governor everything. They saved my life. Nothing had ever been done like that before. Or since, to be fair. I’ve been told the reason why is I never retaliated when kicked. That’s what they saw in me, making me different from all the other really good footballers in prison.”

Having caught the eye with Cowes, unsuccessful trials followed at Southend United, Millwall and Wimbledon after being granted parole — with one eye on preventing a return to crime — during pre-season. Then came Sunderland and a chance to really break free from the past.

“Moving 300 miles from home was the best thing that could have happened to me,” he says. “Suddenly, I was away from temptation. It’s the big message I try to get across today when going into the prisons and holding workshops.

“Don’t go back to the same area, give yourself distance from that old crowd. Not that you cut people off, even if they are on the wrong side of the law. My mates still came to watch me wherever I played.

“But I needed to put space between me and them. If they’re really your friend, they’ll accept you are trying to turn your life around.”

His five years at Bradford City remain the happiest of his career, especially the back-to-back seasons when promotion to the Premier League was followed by a great escape to avoid relegation. He retired from the professional game in 2005.

go-deeper

The Premier League club who had a parade... for avoiding relegation

Dark days soon followed. The loss of a structured existence — “Football is like prison in many ways, in that every day is mapped out for you” — led to heavy bouts of drinking and depression. At one stage, a return to crime seemed on the cards.

“Money dried up and I was very close,” he says, that grin having by now disappeared. “What stopped me doing something stupid was one of my closest friends. He’s serving a long sentence, 30 years or so, and he said one day, ‘Sort yourself out — or you’ll end up in the next cell to me’.”

Lawrence heeded his friend’s advice. He set up the Jamie Lawrence Football Academy, which he continues to run daily in Wandsworth, south London. Ruben Loftus-Cheek and Reece James are among those to have been put through their paces in recent years during the close season.

brixton prison visit request

He’s also worked as a fitness coach for Ghana under former Chelsea manager Grant and is now planning for Zambia’s World Cup qualifiers later this month against Morocco and Tanzania.

“I played in World Cup qualifiers (for Jamaica) but not an actual World Cup,” he says. “I never thought I’d get this second chance, especially on the back of such a brilliant experience at this year’s Africa Cup of Nations (when Zambia were unfortunate to go out in the group stage).”

Then, there are those prison visits, which came off the back of mentoring at Nightingale School, an educational facility for expelled youngsters in south London.

“A few of those kids still come down to see me at the Football Academy,” he says. “One of them runs his own business now, a warehouse for removals. Others just work normal jobs, but jobs they’d never dreamed of being able to do back then.

“They’ve worked hard. Money can’t buy that feeling you’ve helped someone along the right road.”

Lawrence’s parents have both passed away. He adds: “The only time I cried when I was inside was when mum came to visit me and asked, ‘Why are you doing this to me, son?’. She was my queen and I’d let her down.

“The last time I took her out was to watch a documentary that Sky had put together about my life. It was 25 minutes long and they visited the prison, spoke to the prison officer who let me out and a couple of the managers I’d played under.

“Mum was so proud watching it. That was a big comfort when she died not long after. Dad had died proud because he found out I’d been called up to play for Jamaica and now my mum had died double proud because she’d seen the documentary.”

That, we say, as Boxpark in Croydon starts to fill up this Wednesday afternoon, brings us neatly round to the proposed film on Lawrence’s life. Who should play the lead role?

“That’s a good question,” he says, pausing for a moment. “I’m honestly not sure. Oh, hang on. Ashley Walters, the actor from (Netflix drama) Top Boy. He’d be good as me!”

(Top photos: Getty Images, Richard Sutcliffe/ The Athletic )

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IMAGES

  1. HMP Brixton Prison Visit Guide

    brixton prison visit request

  2. Visit to Brixton Prison

    brixton prison visit request

  3. Brixton Prison Information, Telephone, Book Visit & Address

    brixton prison visit request

  4. Camilla meets inmates and staff on Brixton Prison visit

    brixton prison visit request

  5. Brixton Prison Information, Telephone, Book Visit & Address

    brixton prison visit request

  6. Brixton Prison Information, Telephone, Book Visit & Address

    brixton prison visit request

VIDEO

  1. Escaping Prison

  2. HMP Prisoner Wants A Visit UK

  3. Ratlin picks up his brother Shak Corleone From Jail

  4. Total Chaos

  5. HM Prison Brixton revisit. I will break your camera!

COMMENTS

  1. Brixton Prison

    You can book your visit by emailing: [email protected]. Or you can book by telephone. Booking line: 0208 588 6230 or 0208 588 6231. Monday to Friday, 8:30am to 4:00pm. Only legal ...

  2. You can now book a prison visit online

    Now you can book a visit online. It takes about 5 minutes. Before, picking an available date was pot luck. Now there's a date-picker that lets you select 3 possible slots instead of 1. It's a straight-forward service with user-needs at its heart but, if you get stuck, you can call the prison's visits booking line and someone will help you ...

  3. HMP Brixton Prison

    At least one visitor must be 18 or older at every visit. To book a visit to Brixton Prison, You can do this online here. You will need the prisoners number, their date of birth and the dates of birth of the visitors. If you haven't heard back through email after a few days, call 02086781433.

  4. Visits & Getting There, HMP Brixton

    Visits are held at the following times, they vary according to which week of the month it is. For the 1 st 3 weeks they are held at: Tuesday: 08:30 - 10:00, 10:30 - 11:45, 13:15 - 14:30, 15:00 - 16:15 ... If travelling by car, the prison is situated one mile south of Brixton on the A23, off Brixton Hill. Parking on Jebb Avenue is ...

  5. Brixton Prison Information, Telephone, Book Visit & Address

    How to Book a Brixton Prison Visit. You can also book your visit by telephone. Booking line: 0208 678 1433. Monday to Thursday: 1:15pm to 4pm Friday: 9am to 11:45am. and prisoner ID of the inmate you wish to visit when booking.

  6. HMP BRIXTON

    Visit Booking: Online. Use this online service to book a social visit to a prisoner in England or Wales you need the: prisoner number; prisoner's date of birth; dates of birth for all visitors coming with you; The prisoner must add you to their visitor list before you can book a visit. You'll get an email confirming your visit. It takes 1 ...

  7. Unlocking Insight into HMP Brixton

    Situated in Brixton, London, England, HMP Brixton is a Category C men's public prison and Young Offenders Institution. The facility, which is managed by His Majesty's Prison and Probation Service, houses 798 male prisoners, primarily convicted by local courts. Prisoners are provided with healthcare, education, sports, and religious amenities.

  8. Handling prison visit requests: the inside story

    "The biggest change was getting rid of paper Visiting Orders (VOs). In the old way of doing things, prisoners used to have to complete these and send them to visitors so that they could book a visit." "In the new service, the visitor can simply go online and request a visit - as long as they are on the prisoner's approved visiting list."

  9. HMP Brixton

    HMP Brixton. If you think the prisoner is at immediate risk please call the switchboard on 0208 588 6000 and ask for the Orderly Officer and explain that your concern is an emergency. If your concern is urgent but not life-threatening, please call the Safer Custody Helpline - 0208 588 6156 or contact the prison safer custody team using the web ...

  10. Inside Look: Life and Conditions at Brixton Prison

    Daily Life: Keeping in line with human rights standards, prisoners at Brixton enjoy privileges like access to meals, healthcare, educational opportunities, and visits from loved ones. Regulations vary from one individual to another, so it's always essential to confirm with prison authorities. Meals: Prisoners are entitled to three meals a day ...

  11. Staying in touch with someone in prison: Visiting someone in prison

    A convicted prisoner is usually allowed at least two 1-hour visits every 4 weeks. A prisoner on remand (waiting for their trial) is allowed three 1-hour visits a week. You can find out more about ...

  12. HM Prison Brixton

    HMP Brixton. /  51.451611°N 0.125250°W  / 51.451611; -0.125250. HM Prison Brixton used to be a local prison but has been since 2012 a Category C training establishment men's prison, located in Brixton area of the London Borough of Lambeth, in inner - South London. The prison is operated by His Majesty's Prison Service .

  13. General Information, HMP Brixton

    The prison holds a large population of sexual offenders. Key Facts. 660 new prisoners received each year (an average of 55 per month). 215 prisoners convicted of a sexual offence. 51 foreign national prisoners. 49% of prisoners are from a black and minority ethnic background. An average of 74 prisoners is released into the community each month.

  14. Secure video calls with prisoners

    Contents. You can take part in a secure video call with a family member or friend in prisons in England and Wales. Video calls last up to 60 minutes and can have up to 4 people on the call talking ...

  15. HMP Brixton

    HMP Brixton is a Category C prison located in the Brixton area of London. Established in 1819, the facility has a capacity to hold up to 798 male inmates. The prison is known for its focus on rehabilitation and offers a range of educational and vocational programmes. Recent news stories have highlighted its efforts to improve conditions and ...

  16. About

    Request a Song Donate. About. The Prison Radio Association uses sound to change lives. ... PRA PRODUCES SERIES ON HISTORY OF BRIXTON PRISON FOR BBC RADIO 4. London's Oldest Prison saw historian Jerry White visit HMP Brixton to talk to prisoners and staff about the changes that have taken place in criminal justice over the past 200 years.

  17. Brixton Prison: various encroachments

    Catalogue description Brixton Prison: various encroachments Ordering and viewing options ... to do this. Or, you can request a quotation for a copy to be sent to you. Book a visit Request a copy; Details of PCOM 7/103; Reference: PCOM 7/103 Description: Brixton Prison: various encroachments. Date: 1925-1928

  18. PRISONS AND PRISONERS: Brixton Prison

    Book a visit Request a copy; Details of HO 45/10030/A57476; Reference: HO 45/10030/A57476 Description: PRISONS AND PRISONERS: Brixton Prison. Date: 1895-1904 Held by: The National Archives, Kew: Former reference in its original department: A57476: Legal status: Public Record(s) ...

  19. What is the dress code for Brixton visit?

    Brixton Prison has a strict dress code policy which means visitors should dress ... Takedown request View complete answer on gov.uk. What is the number for HMP Brixton visiting? If you haven't had a confirmation e-mail after 3 days, call 020 8678 1433. This number is manned 13:30 - 16:30 weekdays, and you can also make new bookings by calling ...

  20. What is the dress code for Brixton visit?

    What is the number for HMP Brixton visiting? If you have made a booking for a visit to HMP Brixton and haven't received a confirmation email after 3 days, you can call the prison directly at 020 8678 1433. The phone lines are manned from 13:30 to 16:30 on weekdays. You can also make new bookings by calling this number.

  21. Steve Bannon asks appeals court to allow him to remain out of prison

    Bannon filed an emergency motion asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for Washington, D.C., to overrule a lower court's ruling that ordered him to report to prison on July 1.

  22. Brixton Prison: Action plan

    Details. This action plan is the HMPPS and MoJ response to the HM Inspectorate of Prisons inspection report for Brixton Prison. Published 26 June 2019.

  23. Jamie Lawrence: From prison to the Premier League and beyond

    Lawrence's big break came via the prison's traditional Boxing Day meeting between their own team and Cowes Sports. He scored twice, including the winner, to prompt an unusual request from the ...