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This page was published more than five years ago. Information on the page may be out of date.

  • For U.S. Citizens/Lawful Permanent Residents

Are You Planning a Trip to Mexico from the United States?

Warning: it's Illegal to Carry Firearms or Ammo into Mexico.

For border crossing information, tune into the port of entry's Loop Radio on 1620 AM. Report drug and alien smuggling. Call (956) 542-5811 in the U.S., 001800-0105237 from Mexico.

Prohibited/Permissible Items

  • All articles acquired in Mexico must be declared.
  • $800 exemption for gifts and personal articles, including one liter of alcoholic beverages per person over 21 every 30 days.
  • Cuban cigars are prohibited.
  • Check with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) about importing any medications prior to crossing into Mexico.
  • CBP has a zero-tolerance policy on illegal drugs. Any type, in any amount may result in serious fines, seizure of vehicle, federal record and/or imprisonment.
  • Switchblade knives, sea turtle boots or any other articles of endangered species (i.e. spotted cats, coral, crocodile, elephant, etc) are prohibited.

Prohibited/Permissible Agricultural Items

  • Most fruits are prohibited (No oranges or apples)
  • Do not take U.S. fruits and meats to Mexico-You cannot bring them back.
  • Before you go to Mexico, ask a CBP Officer for a list of items you can bring back.
  • Fines of $50 to $1,000 may result if you fail to declared agricultural items.

Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission

  • You must be 21 years of age to possess alcoholic beverages, if you are not 21, the alcohol will automatically be confiscated.
  • One liter of alcohol and one case of beer may be imported per person every 30 days.
  • No ID=no liquor. You must prove that you are 21 or older. If you show false or altered personal identification, the ID will be confiscated and you will be prosecuted.
  • If you are 18 or over one carton of cigarettes may be imported.
  • It is illegal in Texas to consume or possess with intent to consume alcoholic beverages in a public place on Sundays between 2:15 a.m. and noon or on any other day between 2:15 a.m. and 7 a.m.
  • You are required to pay state tax on all alcoholic beverages and all cigarettes imported into Texas.

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  • Fact Sheets

Frequently Asked Questions: Guidance for Travelers to Enter the U.S.

Updated Date: April 21, 2022

Since January 22, 2022, DHS has required non-U.S. individuals seeking to enter the United States via land ports of entry and ferry terminals at the U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Canada borders to be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 and provide proof of vaccination upon request.  On April 21, 2022, DHS announced that it would extend these requirements. In determining whether and when to rescind this order, DHS anticipates that it will take account of whether the vaccination requirement for non-U.S. air travelers remains in place.

These requirements apply to non-U.S. individuals who are traveling for essential or non-essential reasons. They do not apply to U.S. citizens, Lawful Permanent Residents, or U.S. nationals.

Effective November 8, 2021, new air travel requirements applied to many noncitizens who are visiting the United States temporarily. These travelers are also required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination. All air travelers, including U.S. persons, must test negative for COVID-19 prior to departure. Limited exceptions apply. See  CDC guidance  for more details regarding air travel requirements.

Below is more information about what to know before you go, and answers to Frequently Asked Questions about cross-border travel.

Entering the U.S. Through a Land Port of Entry or Ferry Terminal

Q. what are the requirements for travelers entering the united states through land poes.

A:  Before embarking on a trip to the United States, non-U.S. travelers should be prepared for the following:

  • Possess proof of an approved COVID-19 vaccination as outlined on the  CDC  website.
  • During border inspection, verbally attest to their COVID-19 vaccination status. 
  • Bring a  Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative  compliant border crossing document, such as a valid passport (and visa if required), Trusted Traveler Program card, a Department of State-issued Border Crossing Card, Enhanced Driver’s License or Enhanced Tribal Card when entering the country. Travelers (including U.S. citizens) should be prepared to present the WHTI-compliant document and any other documents requested by the CBP officer.

 Q. What are the requirements to enter the United States for children under the age of 18 who can't be vaccinated?

A:  Children under 18 years of age are excepted from the vaccination requirement at land and ferry POEs.

Q: Which vaccines/combination of vaccines will be accepted?

A:  Per CDC guidelines, all Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved and authorized vaccines, as well as all vaccines that have an Emergency Use Listing (EUL) from the World Health Organization (WHO), will be accepted.

Accepted Vaccines:

  • More details are available in CDC guidance  here .
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after your dose of an accepted single-dose COVID-19 vaccine;
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after your second dose of an accepted 2-dose series;
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after you received the full series of an accepted COVID-19 vaccine (not placebo) in a clinical trial;
  • 2 weeks (14 days) after you received 2 doses of any “mix-and-match” combination of accepted COVID-19 vaccines administered at least 17 days apart.

Q. Is the United States requiring travelers to have a booster dose to be considered fully vaccinated for border entry purposes?

A:  No. The CDC guidance for “full vaccination” can be found here.

Q: Do U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents need proof of vaccination to return to the United States via land POEs and ferry terminals?

A:  No. Vaccination requirements do not apply to U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs). Travelers that exhibit signs or symptoms of illness will be referred to CDC for additional medical evaluation.

Q: Is pre- or at-arrival COVID testing required to enter the United States via land POEs or ferry terminals?

A: No, there is no COVID testing requirement to enter the United States via land POE or ferry terminals. In this respect, the requirement for entering by a land POE or ferry terminal differs from arrival via air, where there is a requirement to have a negative test result before departure.

Processing Changes Announced on January 22, 2022 

Q: new changes were recently announced. what changed on january 22.

A:  Since January 22, 2022, non-citizens who are not U.S. nationals or Lawful Permanent Residents have been required to be vaccinated against COVID-19 to enter the United States at land ports of entry and ferry terminals, whether for essential or nonessential purposes. Previously, DHS required that non-U.S. persons be vaccinated against COVID-19 to enter the United States for nonessential purposes.  Effective January 22, all non-U.S. individuals, to include essential travelers, must be prepared to attest to vaccination status and present proof of vaccination to a CBP officer upon request. DHS announced an extension of this policy on April 21, 2022.

Q: Who is affected by the changes announced on January 22?

A: This requirement does not apply to U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents. It applies to other noncitizens, such as a citizen of Mexico, Canada, or any other country seeking to enter the United States through a land port of entry or ferry terminal.

Q: Do U.S. citizens need proof of vaccination to return to the United States via land port of entry or ferry terminals?

A: Vaccination requirements do not apply to U.S. Citizens, U.S. nationals or U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents. Travelers that exhibit signs or symptoms of illness will be referred to CDC for additional medical evaluation. 

Q: What is essential travel?

A:  Under the prior policy, there was an exception from temporary travel restrictions for “essential travel.” Essential travel included travel to attend educational institutions, travel to work in the United States, travel for emergency response and public health purposes, and travel for lawful cross-border trade (e.g., commercial truckers). Under current policy, there is no exception for essential travel.

Q: Will there be any exemptions? 

A: While most non-U.S. individuals seeking to enter the United States will need to be vaccinated, there is a narrow list of exemptions consistent with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Order in the air travel context.

  • Certain categories of individuals on diplomatic or official foreign government travel as specified in the CDC Order
  • Children under 18 years of age;
  • Certain participants in certain COVID-19 vaccine trials as specified in the CDC Order;   
  • Individuals with medical contraindications to receiving a COVID-19 vaccine as specified in the CDC Order;
  • Individuals issued a humanitarian or emergency exception by the Secretary of Homeland Security;
  • Individuals with valid nonimmigrant visas (excluding B-1 [business] or B-2 [tourism] visas) who are citizens of a country with limited COVID-19 vaccine availability, as specified in the CDC Order
  • Members of the U.S. Armed Forces or their spouses or children (under 18 years of age) as specified in the CDC Order; and
  • Individuals whose entry would be in the U.S. national interest, as determined by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

Q: What documentation will be required to show vaccination status?

A:  Non-U.S. individuals are required to be prepared to attest to vaccination status and present proof of vaccination to a CBP officer upon request regardless of the purpose of travel.

The current documentation requirement remains the same and is available on the CDC website . Documentation requirements for entry at land ports of entry and ferry terminals mirror those for entry by air.

Q: What happens if someone doesn’t have proof of vaccine status?

A: If non-U.S. individuals cannot present proof of vaccination upon request, they will not be admitted into the United States and will either be subject to removal or be allowed to withdraw their application for entry.

Q: Will incoming travelers be required to present COVID-19 test results?

A: There is no COVID-19 testing requirement for travelers at land border ports of entry, including ferry terminals.

Q: What does this mean for those who can't be vaccinated, either due to age or other health considerations? 

A: See CDC guidance for additional information on this topic. Note that the vaccine requirement does not apply to children under 18 years of age.

Q: Does this requirement apply to amateur and professional athletes?

A: Yes, unless they qualify for one of the narrow CDC exemptions.

Q: Are commercial truckers required to be vaccinated?

A: Yes, unless they qualify for one of the narrow CDC exemptions. These requirements also apply to bus drivers as well as rail and ferry operators.

Q. Do you expect border wait times to increase?

A:  As travelers navigate these new travel requirements, wait times may increase. Travelers should account for the possibility of longer than normal wait times and lines at U.S. land border crossings when planning their trip and are kindly encouraged to exercise patience.

To help reduce wait times and long lines, travelers can take advantage of innovative technology, such as facial biometrics and the CBP OneTM mobile application, which serves as a single portal for individuals to access CBP mobile applications and services.

Q: How is Customs and Border Protection staffing the ports of entry? 

A: CBP’s current staffing levels at ports of entry throughout the United States are commensurate with pre-pandemic levels. CBP has continued to hire and train new employees throughout the pandemic. CBP expects some travelers to be non-compliant with the proof of vaccination requirements, which may at times lead to an increase in border wait times. Although trade and travel facilitation remain a priority, we cannot compromise national security, which is our primary mission. CBP Office of Field Operations will continue to dedicate its finite resources to the processing of arriving traffic with emphasis on trade facilitation to ensure economic recovery.

Q: What happens if a vaccinated individual is traveling with an unvaccinated individual?  

A:  The unvaccinated individual (if 18 or over) would not be eligible for admission.

Q: If I am traveling for an essential reason but am not vaccinated can I still enter?

A:  No, if you are a non-U.S. individual. The policy announced on January 22, 2022 applies to both essential and non-essential travel by non-U.S. individual travelers. Since January 22, DHS has required that all inbound non-U.S. individuals crossing U.S. land or ferry POEs – whether for essential or non-essential reasons – be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 and provide related proof of vaccination upon request.

Q: Are sea crew members on vessels required to have a COVID vaccine to disembark?

A:  Sea crew members traveling pursuant to a C-1 or D nonimmigrant visa are not excepted from COVID-19 vaccine requirements at the land border. This is a difference from the international air transportation context.

Entering the U.S. via Air Travel

Q: what are the covid vaccination requirements for air passengers to the united states  .

A:  According to CDC requirements [www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/noncitizens-US-air-travel.html | Link no longer valid], most noncitizens who are visiting the United States temporarily must be fully vaccinated prior to boarding a flight to the United States. These travelers are required to show proof of vaccination. A list of covered individuals is available on the CDC website.  

Q: What are the COVID testing requirements for air passengers to the United States?  

A:  Effective Sunday, June 12 at 12:01 a.m. ET, CDC will no longer require pre-departure COVID-19 testing for U.S.-bound air travelers.

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U.S. Issues Travel Warning for Mexico Ahead of Spring Break

The warning is asking travelers to “travel smart” and “be informed."

us tourist mexico

marako85/Getty Images

The United States is warning travelers heading to Mexico to be aware of their surroundings ahead of the spring break holiday season.

The warning , which was issued this week by the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico, reminds travelers to “travel smart” and “be informed” as “thousands of U.S. citizens visit Mexico during spring break” each year. The embassy continued that “while the vast majority travel safely,” visitors should be aware of issues with crime, drugs, unregulated alcohol, drownings, and more. 

“Crime, including violent crime, can occur anywhere in Mexico, including in popular tourist destinations. Travelers should maintain a high level of situational awareness, avoid areas where illicit activities occur, and promptly depart from potentially dangerous situations,” the embassy warned. “U.S. citizens should exercise increased caution in the downtown areas of popular spring break locations including Cancun, Playa Del Carmen, and Tulum, especially after dark.”

The warning also reminded American travelers that drug possession and use is illegal in Mexico, including medical marijuana. It also advised that unregulated alcohol may be contaminated, that counterfeit medication is common, and that guns are illegal in Mexico.

When it comes to the country’s popular beaches, the embassy reminded travelers some beaches may have strong rip tides and “may lack lifeguards, warnings, or signs of unsafe conditions.”

The U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico issued a similar spring break warning last year .

The U.S. Department of State classifies different states in Mexico under different warning levels. While travelers can “exercise normal precautions” when traveling to the Campeche and Yucatan states, the State Department warns them to “exercise increased caution” when heading to places like Baja California Sur (where Los Cabos is), Mexico City, and Quintana Roo (where Cancun is) due to crime.

The State Department also asks American travelers to “reconsider” going to the state of Jalisco, which is home to popular destination Puerto Vallarta , due to the danger of crime and kidnapping.

The State Department recommends Americans who do travel to Mexico keep people at home informed of their travel plans and enroll in the department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to both receive alerts and make it easier to locate them if an emergency occurs.

Travelers heading to international destinations can view all current travel advisories on the State Department's website at  travel.state.gov .

Related Articles

us tourist mexico

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Visit the USAGov homepage

How to apply for or renew a U.S. tourist visa

If you visit the U.S. for tourism or business, you may need a visitor visa, also known as a tourist visa. Learn how to get and renew this type of nonimmigrant visa.

Find out if you need a visa to visit the U.S.

Check if your country participates in the U.S. Visa Waiver Program (VWP) . If it does, you can get a waiver and will not need a visa. If you do not see your country listed, you will need a visitor visa.

Visitor (tourist) visas and other travel documents for entering the U.S.

The visitor visa is a type of nonimmigrant visa for people who wish to temporarily enter the U.S. There are two categories:

  • B-1 for business travel
  • B-2 for tourism and medical treatment

Learn about B-1 and B-2 visas , including:

  • Reasons you would need each type of visitor visa
  • How to apply
  • What documents you will need
  • Application fees
  • How to prepare for your interview at your U.S. embassy or consulate

Along with your visa, you must bring a passport issued by your country of citizenship. When you arrive at your port of entry into the U.S., officials will issue you a Form I-94, which electronically records your arrival and departure dates. Learn more about Form I-94.

How to renew a visitor visa

The process to renew a visitor visa is the same as getting one for the first time. Follow the process to apply for a visitor visa from the Department of State.

Find the contact information for your nearest U.S. embassy or consulate and contact them for visa renewal information.

Understand expiration dates for visas and I-94 forms

  • The date you must depart the U.S. will be shown on your Form I-94. This date is determined by the Customs and Border Protection officer when you arrive at the port-of-entry into the U.S. 
  • Only diplomatic visa holders and their dependents can renew their visas while they are in the U.S.

LAST UPDATED: May 31, 2024

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Health Care

The 4 kidnapped americans are part of a large wave of u.s. medical tourism in mexico.

Bill Chappell

us tourist mexico

A Red Cross worker closes the door of an ambulance carrying two Americans found alive after they were abducted in Matamoros, Mexico, last week. Two of four Americans have been found dead, after they were caught in a cartel shootout, officials said Tuesday. AP hide caption

A Red Cross worker closes the door of an ambulance carrying two Americans found alive after they were abducted in Matamoros, Mexico, last week. Two of four Americans have been found dead, after they were caught in a cartel shootout, officials said Tuesday.

The four Americans who were shot at and abducted in Mexico were reportedly visiting for medical tourism — making them part of a booming industry that is vital to Mexico's economy.

"Pre-pandemic, some 1.2 million American citizens traveled to Mexico for elective medical treatment," Josef Woodman, CEO of Patients Beyond Borders , told NPR. His firm publishes a guide to international medical travel.

2 surviving Americans who were kidnapped in Mexico are back in the U.S.

Latin America

2 surviving americans who were kidnapped in mexico are back in the u.s..

Here's an update on medical tourism, and the recent tragedy:

U.S. medical travel is rising sharply

"Today, the market is recovering rapidly in Mexico, nearly back to its pre-pandemic levels," Woodman said.

Nearly 780,000 people were projected to leave the U.S. for health care in 2022, according to Healthcare.com , citing data from the medical travel website Medical Departures.

Medical tourism in Mexico isn't new, but the recent tragedy put it in the spotlight

Medical tourism in mexico isn't new, but the recent tragedy put it in the spotlight.

That outburst of activity got a big boost in late 2021, when the U.S. relaxed key border restrictions with Mexico.

Costa Rica is the second-most popular destination for U.S. visitors seeking medical care elsewhere, Woodman said. It's a particular draw, he added, for people in the Northeast and Southeast.

Most people travel for dental and cosmetic work

Cosmetic surgeries are just one of the procedures that are far cheaper in Mexico — for years, people have been visiting from the U.S. to get elaborate dental work or cosmetic treatments done, or to pick up antibiotics and other medicines at favorable prices.

A Reason To Smile: Mexican Town Is A Destination For Dental Tourism

Shots - Health News

A reason to smile: mexican town is a destination for dental tourism.

Many people also travel to get orthopedic work done, replacing knees or hips for less than half the cost of such procedures in the U.S.

"North American patients travel to Mexico for care primarily to save 50-70% over what they would pay in the United States for an elective treatment," according to Woodman.

Medical tourism does bring risks, experts say

While an element of risk is inherent in many procedures no matter where they're performed, medical tourism can heighten complications, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Potential problems range from the dangers of flying in a pressurized plane cabin too soon after a surgery to the complications of getting follow-up care for a procedure done in another country.

us tourist mexico

Medical tourism numbers are on the rise in Mexico, after the practice was curtailed by COVID-19 restrictions. Here, foreign patients are seen at the hospital Oasis of Hope in Tijuana in, 2019, in Mexico's Baja California state. Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

Medical tourism numbers are on the rise in Mexico, after the practice was curtailed by COVID-19 restrictions. Here, foreign patients are seen at the hospital Oasis of Hope in Tijuana in, 2019, in Mexico's Baja California state.

Some of the most serious warnings from the CDC are for infections, from wound and blood infections to pathogens that might be more common or resistant in the host country than in the U.S.

"Recent examples include surgical site infections caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria in patients who underwent cosmetic surgery in the Dominican Republic," the CDC says, "and Q fever in patients who received fetal sheep cell injections in Germany."

U.S. medical tourists rate Mexico highly

A 2020 research paper that surveyed some 427 Americans crossing the U.S.-Mexico border in California for medical services found that most of the respondents "felt that Mexican health care services are of the same or better quality compared with those in the United States, for a lower cost."

People had come from 29 states across the U.S. to get care in Mexico, with the vast majority driven by cost concerns, according to the paper, published in the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association .

Hit with $7,146 for two hospital bills, a family sought health care in Mexico

Hit with $7,146 for two hospital bills, a family sought health care in Mexico

The researchers also collected data about the medical tourists themselves, reporting an average age of 64.5 years. Their most common yearly income range was reported to be between $25,001 and $50,000 — but that reflects less than a quarter of the respondents.

More than 400 of the survey's 427 participants said they would undertake more medical tourism in the future, the paper said.

Most of Mexico's hospitals follow U.S. standards

Mexico has worked for years to promote medical tourism to draw patients across the U.S. border. That includes improving its health system and following international standards.

"About 10 years ago, the Mexican federal government licensed the Joint Commission accreditation standards, which are used to accredit U.S. hospitals," as David Vequist, who runs the Center of Medical Tourism Research at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, told NPR's All Things Considered .

"So most Mexican hospitals are now basically using the same standards we use in hospitals in the United States," Vequist added.

Details of the recent violence are still emerging

At least one of the U.S. citizens who were caught up in the recent tragedy was reportedly going to Mexico for a tummy tuck operation. But the group's vehicle came under fire hours after entering the border city of Matamoros, Mexico, from Brownsville, Texas.

Two of the four died; all are reported to be natives of Lake City, S.C. Their identities have not been released, but relatives have been speaking to NPR and other outlets .

Mexican officials say they believe the four were caught in the middle of a conflict between drug cartels in the state of Tamaulipas — an area that is under a do-not-travel advisory from the U.S. State Department.

  • Medical tourism

Travel, Tourism & Hospitality

Travel and tourism in Mexico - Statistics & Facts

Tourism in mexico during covid-19, international and domestic tourism in mexico, key insights.

Detailed statistics

Share of tourism contribution to GDP in Mexico 2010-2022

Tourism spending in Mexico 2010-2022, by type

Quarterly tourism workforce in Mexico 2018-2023

Editor’s Picks Current statistics on this topic

Inbound tourism volume in Mexico 2016-2022

Largest hotel companies in Mexico 2022, based on revenue

Further recommended statistics

  • Premium Statistic Countries in the Americas with the highest inbound tourist arrivals 2019-2022
  • Basic Statistic Number of tourism jobs in Latin American countries 2022
  • Basic Statistic Number of Latin American and Caribbean World Heritage Sites 2022, by country
  • Premium Statistic Leading global countries in the Travel & Tourism Development Index 2023
  • Premium Statistic Leading countries in the Americas in the Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index 2023

Countries in the Americas with the highest inbound tourist arrivals 2019-2022

Countries with the highest number of international tourist arrivals in the Americas from 2019 to 2022 (in millions)

Number of tourism jobs in Latin American countries 2022

Number of jobs related to travel and tourism in Latin America in 2022, by country (in millions)

Number of Latin American and Caribbean World Heritage Sites 2022, by country

Number of World Heritage properties in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2022, by country

Leading global countries in the Travel & Tourism Development Index 2023

Leading countries in the Travel & Tourism Development Index (TTDI) worldwide in 2023

Leading countries in the Americas in the Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index 2023

Leading countries in the Americas in the Travel & Tourism Development Index (TTDI) in 2023

Key economic figures

  • Premium Statistic Share of tourism contribution to GDP in Mexico 2010-2022
  • Premium Statistic Tourism GDP in Mexico 2010-2022
  • Premium Statistic Tourism GDP in Mexico 2022, by activity
  • Premium Statistic Tourism FDI in Mexico 2010-2022
  • Premium Statistic Tourism establishments in Mexico 2010-2020
  • Premium Statistic Quarterly tourism workforce in Mexico 2018-2023

Tourism sector as a percentage of gross domestic product in Mexico from 2010 to 2022

Tourism GDP in Mexico 2010-2022

Contribution of the tourism sector to the gross domestic product in Mexico from 2010 to 2022 (in billion Mexican pesos)

Tourism GDP in Mexico 2022, by activity

Contribution of the tourism sector to the gross domestic product in Mexico in 2022, by economic activity (in billion Mexican pesos)

Tourism FDI in Mexico 2010-2022

Foreign direct investment in the tourism sector in Mexico from 2010 to 2022 (in million U.S. dollars)

Tourism establishments in Mexico 2010-2020

Number of establishments in the tourism sector in Mexico from 2010 to 2020 (in 1,000s)

Number of employees in the tourism sector in Mexico from 1st quarter 2018 to 2nd quarter 2023 (in millions)

Tourism volume and expenditures

  • Premium Statistic Inbound tourism volume in Mexico 2016-2022
  • Premium Statistic Inbound tourism spending in Mexico 2016-2022
  • Premium Statistic Per capita spending of inbound tourists in Mexico 2016-2022
  • Premium Statistic Number of domestic hotel guests in Mexico 2010-2020
  • Premium Statistic Domestic tourism spending in Mexico 2010-2022
  • Premium Statistic Cruise passenger traffic in Mexico 2022, by port
  • Premium Statistic Most visited archeological sites in Mexico 2022
  • Premium Statistic Quarterly accommodation and holiday package spending in Mexico 2016-2020

Number of international tourists in Mexico from 2016 to 2022 (in millions)

Inbound tourism spending in Mexico 2016-2022

Expenditure of international tourists in Mexico from 2016 to 2022 (in billion U.S. dollars)

Per capita spending of inbound tourists in Mexico 2016-2022

Average expenditure per trip of international visitors in Mexico from 2016 to 2022 (in U.S. dollars)

Number of domestic hotel guests in Mexico 2010-2020

Number of domestic tourists in hotels in Mexico from 2010 to 2020 (in millions)

Domestic tourism spending in Mexico 2010-2022

Expenditure of domestic tourists in Mexico from 2010 to 2022 (in billion Mexican pesos)

Cruise passenger traffic in Mexico 2022, by port

Number of cruise passengers in Mexico in 2022, by port (in 1,000s)

Most visited archeological sites in Mexico 2022

Most popular archeological sites in Mexico in 2022, by number of visitors (in 1,000s)

Quarterly accommodation and holiday package spending in Mexico 2016-2020

Quarterly expenditure on accommodation and tour packages in Mexico between 2016 and 2020 (in billion Mexican pesos)

Hotel industry

  • Premium Statistic Number of hotels in Mexican states 2023
  • Premium Statistic Largest hotel companies in Mexico 2022, based on revenue
  • Premium Statistic Hotel room occupancy in Mexico 2010-2022
  • Premium Statistic Hotel room occupancy rate in Mexico 2019-2022, by type of location
  • Premium Statistic Occupancy rates in key Mexican hotel markets 2022
  • Premium Statistic Main tourist destinations in Mexico 2020-2022, by number of occupied rooms
  • Basic Statistic Top Mexican resorts 2023, by user ratings

Number of hotels in Mexican states 2023

Number of hotel establishments in Mexico as of June 2023, by federal state

Leading companies in the hotel industry in Mexico in 2022, by net revenue (in billion Mexican pesos)

Hotel room occupancy in Mexico 2010-2022

Occupancy rate of hotel rooms in Mexico from 2010 to 2022

Hotel room occupancy rate in Mexico 2019-2022, by type of location

Room occupancy of hotel establishments in Mexico from 2019 to 2022, by type of location

Occupancy rates in key Mexican hotel markets 2022

Tourist destinations with highest hotel room occupancy in Mexico in 2022

Main tourist destinations in Mexico 2020-2022, by number of occupied rooms

Leading travel destinations for overnight tourism in Mexico from 2020 to 2022, by number of occupied hotel rooms

Top Mexican resorts 2023, by user ratings

Best-rated resorts in Mexico in 2023, based on user scores

Traveler preferences

  • Premium Statistic Most popular holiday destination type for Mexicans 2022
  • Premium Statistic Most popular domestic holiday destinations in Mexico 2022
  • Premium Statistic Favorite aspects of domestic holiday trips for Mexicans 2022
  • Premium Statistic Favorite aspects of outbound holiday trips for Mexicans 2022
  • Premium Statistic Favorite type of holidays for Mexicans 2022
  • Premium Statistic Breakdown of Mexican holidaymakers 2022, by travel companion

Most popular holiday destination type for Mexicans 2022

Most common type of travel destination for leisure travelers from Mexico as of June 2022

Most popular domestic holiday destinations in Mexico 2022

Most common domestic travel destinations in Mexico as of June 2022

Favorite aspects of domestic holiday trips for Mexicans 2022

Preferred amenities of domestic leisure tourists in Mexico as of June 2022

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Mexico’s Visitor Tax: A Comprehensive Guide for Travelers

Mexico's Visitor Tax

Welcome to Visitax Gob Mx, your number one source for information about Mexico’s visitor tax . As a tourist visiting Mexico, you may be required to pay an additional tax that goes towards the development of local infrastructure and services. Our team is dedicated to providing you with all the necessary information and guidance to make sure you comply with this regulation. Stay tuned for more updates and insights on Mexico’s visitor tax!

Are you planning to visit Mexico soon? If so, it is important to know about the Mexico Visitor Tax or Visitax tourist tax . This tax is levied on all tourists entering Mexico and covers various services provided to visitors during their stay in the country such as tourist infrastructure, public services, and cultural promotion. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about the Mexico Visitor Tax.

What is the Mexico Visitor Tax?

Mexico Visitor Tax, also known as Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun , is a tax levied by the Mexican government on all tourists who enter the country by air or sea. This tax is included in the ticket price of your airline or cruise and is paid by your travel operator. The tax is calculated based on the length of your stay in Mexico and the destination you are visiting.

How much is the Mexico Visitor Tax?

The Visitax Gob Mx tax rate varies depending on the destination and length of stay. For example, if you are staying in Cancun for less than 24 hours, then you do not have to pay the tax. However, for stays longer than 24 hours, the tax is $32.00 USD per person. This tax must be paid at the airport upon arrival in Mexico or through your travel operator.

How is the Mexico Visitor Tax used?

The funds raised from the Mexico Visitor Tax are used to improve the tourist infrastructure, public services, and cultural promotion in Mexico. These funds are also used to maintain the natural beauty of Mexico’s many beaches, parks, and other tourist attractions.

Why is the Mexico Visitor Tax important?

The Mexico Visitor Tax helps to ensure that tourists have a safe and enjoyable stay in Mexico. The funds raised from this tax are used to provide better infrastructure, public services, and cultural promotion, which make for a more hospitable and welcoming environment for tourists.

In conclusion, if you are planning your next vacation to Mexico, it is important to know about the Mexico Visitor Tax. This tax is a small contribution that goes a long way in maintaining and improving the tourist infrastructure, public services, and cultural promotion in Mexico. So, the next time you visit Mexico, make sure you budget for this important tax.

Understanding Mexico Visitor Tax: A Guide to Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun

Understanding Mexico Visitor Tax: A Guide to Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun is an informative article that provides detailed information about the Visitax tourist tax in Cancun. The article explains the purpose of the tax, how it works, and who is required to pay it. It also outlines the different ways visitors can pay the tax and what they need to do if they want to claim a refund. The article is an essential read for anyone traveling to Cancun who wants to avoid any confusion or issues related to the Visitax tourist tax. Overall, this guide is a valuable resource for all visitors to Cancun who want to ensure that they are fully prepared for their trip and have a stress-free experience.

Preguntas frecuentes

What is the visitax tourist tax cancun and how does it affect travelers to mexico.

Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun is a new tax implemented by the Mexican government for travelers visiting Cancun and other tourist destinations in the Quintana Roo region. The tax was introduced on April 1, 2021, and applies to both foreign and domestic visitors aged 15 and over.

The tax amount is (approximately $39 USD) per person and can be paid online or at kiosks located at airports, hotels, bus stations, and other tourist spots. Travelers can also pay the tax in advance through the Visitax website.

This tax does not affect travelers who are staying at an all-inclusive resort or those who are only transiting through Cancun’s airport without leaving the transit area.

It’s important for travelers to be aware of this tax and factor it into their travel budget when planning a trip to Cancun or other parts of Quintana Roo. Failure to pay the tax could result in a fine or delay at the airport.

Can the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun be paid online or must it be paid in person upon arrival?

The Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun can be paid online or in person upon arrival. However, it is recommended to pay the tax online before traveling to Cancun in order to save time and avoid long lines at the airport. The tax can be paid on the Visitax website using a credit card, and a digital receipt will be provided that can be presented at the airport. It’s important to note that the tax is mandatory for all visitors over the age of 18 entering the state of Quintana Roo, which includes popular destinations such as Cancun, Playa del Carmen, and Tulum.

Are there any exemptions or discounts available for certain groups, such as children or senior citizens, when it comes to the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun?

As of now, there are no exemptions or discounts available for any specific groups when it comes to the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun. Every person who arrives in Cancun will have to pay the tax regardless of age or other factors. The current rate is $10 USD or its equivalent in pesos per person and must be paid before departure from Cancun.

Will the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun be applied to all forms of travel to Mexico, including air and sea travel?

Yes , the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun will be applied to all forms of travel to Mexico, including air and sea travel. It is a tax that applies to all foreign tourists visiting the state of Quintana Roo, which includes Cancun, Cozumel, and other popular destinations in the area. The tax will be collected upon arrival, either by airlines or at immigration checkpoints.

How will the revenue collected from the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun be used to benefit tourism in Cancun and Mexico as a whole?

The revenue collected from the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun will be used to benefit tourism in Cancun and Mexico as a whole in several ways. Firstly, it will be used to fund projects aimed at improving the infrastructure and services in tourist areas, such as the construction of new transportation systems and the enhancement of public spaces. Secondly, the revenue will go towards the preservation and promotion of cultural heritage sites, including museums and historical landmarks. Additionally, the funds will be used to support the development of sustainable tourism, which aims to minimize the negative impact of tourism on the environment and local communities. Finally, the revenue collected from Visitax will also contribute to Mexico’s general budget, which can be allocated to a wide range of public services, including education and healthcare, benefiting both tourists and locals alike.

What are the penalties for not paying the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun, and how can travelers avoid these penalties?

The penalties for not paying the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun can range from fines to being denied boarding on flights leaving Cancun. Travelers who do not pay the tax could face a fine of up to 3,000 Mexican pesos (about $150 USD) per person, plus interest charges. In addition, airlines may refuse to allow passengers who have not paid the tax to board their flights.

To avoid these penalties, travelers should be sure to pay the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun before they arrive in Cancun. The easiest way to pay is online through the Visitax website. The tax is currently (about $39 USD) per person and can be paid using a credit or debit card. Once paid, travelers will receive a receipt that they can present at the airport as proof of payment. It’s important to note that the tax only needs to be paid once per visit, regardless of how long you stay in Cancun.

Are there any plans to increase the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun in the future, and if so, what factors will be considered in determining the new rate?

As of now, there are no published plans to increase the Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun in the near future. However, the government of Quintana Roo, where Cancun is located, has stated that any future increases in the tax rate will be based on factors such as inflation and the need for additional revenue to fund tourism-related infrastructure and services. It’s important to note that the Visitax tourist tax is subject to change at any time by the government, so travelers should always be aware of the current rate when planning their trip to Cancun or other destinations in the area.

In conclusion, the implementation of the Visitax Tourist Tax in Cancun, Mexico has become an important topic for travelers and tourism authorities. As a creator of content , it is essential to inform tourists about this new tax and its impact on their travel budget. Although this tax is a way to generate revenue for local infrastructure and tourism promotion, visitors must be aware of the additional cost and plan their vacations accordingly. Overall, the Visitax Tourist Tax in Cancun serves as a reminder that responsible tourism includes respecting and contributing to the local economy.

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Tourist Tax Cancun   ® | Tourist Tax Mexico ®

Visitax Cancun y Visitax Mexico ® es un sitio web privado desarrollado por Academia Digital ® y no está vinculado o puede estar asociado con ninguna agencia gubernamental ( visitax gob mx ). Visitaxgob.mx ayuda a los viajeros a pagar el impuesto estatal al turismo de Quintana Roo . – Todos Los Derechos Reservados ©2023

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6 Beaches for Budding Swimmers, Surfers and Castle Builders

For families with children, we found half a dozen beaches in the United States and Mexico, each tailored to a particular summer activity.

The small hands of two children can be seen building sand castles with pails and molds in fine, beige beach sand.

By Freda Moon

A family beach vacation is an American classic. But depending on their children’s ages and inclinations, some families may be drawn to different kinds of shorelines: those featuring clear, calm water for snorkeling and learning to swim; or, for shell collectors and young naturalists, sandy stretches carpeted with seashells or bordered by tide pools. For castle builders, fine sand is a must, while would-be surfers need tidy waves, ready to ride. Here are six great beaches in the United States and Baja California for family-favorite summer activities.

For castle builders: Mission Beach , San Diego

San Diego’s temperate climate allows for barefoot beach days year-round. For those who’d rather build with sand than lie in it, Mission Beach has another advantage: San Diego Sand Castles and the sand sculptor JT Estrela. Mr. Estrela, a former math teacher, offers lessons in the art of sand castle construction on this family-friendly Southern California beach, where the sand is perfect for castle building: The grains are fine but not too silty, clean below the tide line, free of shells and rocks, and pack hard.

In his two-to-three-hour sessions (starting at $160 for two people, $20 for each additional person), Mr. Estrela works with families to build elaborate five-foot-tall castles. The goal is for participants to “feel like this insider of arcane knowledge,” he said.

While the best sand in the San Diego area is at the offshore city of Coronado in San Diego Bay, Mr. Estrela prefers working with families at Mission Beach. Known for its boardwalk amusement park, Belmont Park ; historic beachfront swimming pool, the Plunge ; and excellent playgrounds, it’s particularly fun for kids. The smell of cotton candy and hot dogs hangs in the air, mingling with shrieks from the Giant Dipper, Belmont’s 1925 wooden roller coaster, squawking sea gulls and salt spray. Its biggest downside is its popularity, which means parking can be a challenge.

For new swimmers: Onekahakaha Beach Park , Hilo, Hawaii

In an archipelago known for spectacular beaches, Onekahakaha Beach Park , on the rugged, volcanic coast of the Big Island, may seem a counterintuitive choice. At Onekahakaha, with its two large, sandy-bottomed ocean pools enclosed by lava rock walls and backed by palm trees and an expansive grassy lawn, the sand is mostly below the surface.

Separated from the Pacific Ocean’s notoriously powerful waves and rip currents, the seawater within the pools is warm and placid, protected and shallow, which makes it excellent for little kids learning to swim, as well as for older kids to snorkel. It’s also home to nonthreatening marine life (no sharks here), including green sea turtles.

Though the water is only about waist-deep on an adult, there are lifeguards, adding to Onekahakaha’s reputation for safety. And without a wide swath of sand between the pools and the shoreline path, the water is accessible for strollers and wheelchairs. There’s also a swing set, picnic tables and proximity to the lush Hilo area.

As long as you’re on the Big Island, the site of several active volcanoes, visit the thermal pools alongside some of its beaches, including Pohoiki Black Sand Beach at Isaac Hale Beach Park , 40 miles south of Onekahakaha. The ocean there may be a bit rough for young swimmers, but it’s a great place to show children a fresh lava flow.

For would-be surfers: Wrightsville Beach , N.C.

Wrightsville Beach is considered by many surf historians to be the home of East Coast surfing and one of the first places outside Polynesia and the Pacific Rim for the sport to catch on .

It also has some of the best beginner’s breaks in the United States , said Sean Griffin, 37, a surfing instructor and the father of a 5-year-old, who started riding the local break when he was 8.

He points out that Wrightsville is the only surfing beach in the state that has clear, blue water. Being able to see one’s hands and feet and the sandy bottom “makes anyone feel more comfortable in the ocean,” he said.

At Surf With Sean , Mr. Griffin offers private 90-minute lessons ($95 to $120) to surfers as young as 3 and into their 80s, as well as surf camps for kids ($425 per week). “There’s no reason they shouldn’t be able to learn or give it a shot,” said Mr. Griffin, who provides all gear in all sizes, including adaptive equipment.

There’s more to the area’s kid appeal than its waves. Mr. Griffin points to Johnnie Mercers Fishing Pier , at the center of the beach, where his son “loves seeing all the salty fisherman pulling in fish,” and the big, modern playground at Wrightsville Beach Park .

For tide pool explorers: Carkeek Park , Seattle

Naomi Tomky — a lifelong Seattleite, author of “ The Pacific Northwest Seafood Cookbook ” and mother of two daughters, 6 and 8 — recommends Carkeek Park in Seattle for an immersive experience in Puget Sound marine life. At low tide, Ms. Tomky said, the narrow beach “just goes out for ages,” exposing tide pools filled with starfish, sea snails, anemones and “many, many crabs, from the size of your fingernail to the size of your hand.”

Unlike tide-pooling elsewhere on the West Coast, where the powerful Pacific Ocean requires caution because of dangerous sneaker waves , Puget Sound is rich with life but calm enough for Ms. Tomky to let her daughters explore on their own.

Just 30 minutes from downtown Seattle, Carkeek is part of the Seattle Aquarium’s Beach Naturalist Program , which sends naturalists to various shorelines around the area.

Along with the below-the-tide-line intrigue, Carkeek is also known for an annual spectacle: spawning salmon. In the fall, it’s possible to stand over the park’s Piper’s Creek and watch the fish — a sacred Indigenous symbol of the Pacific Northwest — on the run.

“It’s one of the coolest things you can see,” said Ms. Tomky, “to understand how these fish share the city with us as they swim back into their former home.”

For shell hunters: Tigertail Beach , Marco Island, Fla.

Sanibel Island, a barrier island just off Fort Myers, Fla., is one of the most famous shelling destinations on the planet. That popularity comes with a downside: It’s often picked over by enthusiasts who hit the shoreline at dawn. The island is also still recovering from Hurricane Ian, which badly damaged its infrastructure in 2022.

As an alternative, the shelling guide Evan Kuperman (a.k.a. Captain Evan) recommends Tigertail Beach on Marco Island, about an hour south.

Mr. Kuperman, a Florida master naturalist , operates Sand Dollar Shelling Tours . His tours ($125 per adult, $90 per child, and families of up to six people for $650) take guests by boat to places like the Ten Thousand Islands , a mangrove mud flat habitat and National Wildlife Refuge.

For visitors unable to join one of his trips, Mr. Kuperman said that Tigertail, a publicly accessible beach ($8 parking fee), offers exceptional shelling.

Marco Island is more built up than Sanibel, but Tigertail, at the island’s north end, is a county-owned park with a lagoon and a position facing the Gulf of Mexico that lends itself to accumulating seashells, including rare and striking ones, like the spiny ornamented lace murex and reddish brown banded tulip .

But everyone is hoping for a junonia, or Juno’s volute, a sea snail that has to travel far in churning waters to reach the beach intact. “You don’t find it,” said Mr. Kuperman, “it finds you.”

For young snorkelers: Playa el Chileno , Los Cabos, Mexico

About halfway between bustling Cabo San Lucas and San José del Cabo, Playa el Chileno is no longer an undeveloped local secret. Now backed by the sprawling Auberge resort Chileno Bay Resort & Residences , the beach remains public and comparatively tranquil. Awarded the Blue Flag certification for meeting stringent environmental standards, Chileno is exceptionally well maintained.

While catamaran snorkeling tours come and go from Chileno Bay, it’s also possible to reach the reef from the shore, which makes it good for inexperienced snorkelers who might find it intimidating to leap into deep water without easing their way in. High Tide Sea Expeditions offers snorkeling excursions via kayak that start at nearby Playa Santa Maria, hug the coast and arrive at Chileno by water. For younger kids and anyone who prefers more time in the water, there’s a guided two-hour tour that visits both beaches by car ($95 to $130 per person, including equipment).

Among the roughly 50 species of fish that snorkelers might encounter along Chileno’s rocky outcroppings and coral reef, there are large tuna, sea turtles, puffer fish, Panamic green moray eels, Cortez angelfish and blacknosed butterflyfish — among many other colorful creatures. The coral here is less vibrant than some places, but the number and variety of fish are thrilling.

Freda Moon, a frequent contributor to the Travel section, lives on a boat in San Francisco Bay with her husband and two kids. Her upcoming National Geographic book with the coauthor Ashley Harrell, “100 Beaches of a Lifetime,” will be published next year.

Follow New York Times Travel on Instagram and sign up for our weekly Travel Dispatch newsletter to get expert tips on traveling smarter and inspiration for your next vacation. Dreaming up a future getaway or just armchair traveling? Check out our 52 Places to Go in 2024 .

Get Out on the Water This Summer

3 6 Hours in Traverse City, Mich.:  Explore the laid-back city loved for its annual cherry festival, unspoiled lake vistas and access to epic dunes .

6 Great Beaches for Families:  For families with children, we found half a dozen beaches in the United States and Mexico , each tailored to a particular summer activity.

Surfing in Texas: A wave pool in Waco offers consistent conditions, affordable prices and a friendly vibe for beginner surfers .

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Mexico’s tactic to cut immigration to the US: wear out migrants

Yeneska Garcia, a Venezuelan migrant, cries into her hands as she eats at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. Since the 23-year-old fled Venezuela in January, she trekked days through the jungles of The Darien Gap, narrowly survived being kidnapped by Mexican cartels and waited months for an asylum appointment with the U.S. that never came through. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Yeneska Garcia, a Venezuelan migrant, cries into her hands as she eats at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. Since the 23-year-old fled Venezuela in January, she trekked days through the jungles of The Darien Gap, narrowly survived being kidnapped by Mexican cartels and waited months for an asylum appointment with the U.S. that never came through. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

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Mexico is busing migrants back to its southern border. Driven by mounting pressure from the U.S. to block millions of vulnerable people headed north, but lacking the funds to deport them, Mexican authorities are wearing migrants out until they give up. (June 7-10) (AP/Felix Márquez)

Yeneska Garcia, a Venezuelan migrant, cries into her hands as she eats at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. Since the 23-year-old fled Venezuela in January, she trekked days through the jungles of The Darien Gap, narrowly survived being kidnapped by Mexican cartels and waited months for an asylum appointment with the U.S. that never came through. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

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Teenager migrants look at a map of Mexico at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, on Friday, June 7, 2024. After the head of Mexico’s immigration agency ordered a halt to deportations in December, migrants have been left in limbo as authorities round up migrants across the country and dump them in the southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Venezuelan migrant Yeneska Garcia, second from left, sits with other migrants at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. “I would rather cross the Darien Gap 10,000 times than cross Mexico once,” Garcia said. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Josue Martinez serves juice to migrants during lunch at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. “Mexico is the wall,” said Martínez, a psychologist at the only shelter in Villahermosa. "(The migrants) are trapped in the south,” referring to Mexican authorities’ tactic of wearing migrants out until they can no longer continue. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Migrants eat lunch at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. After the head of Mexico’s immigration agency ordered a halt to deportations in December, migrants have been left in limbo as authorities round up migrants across the country and dump them in the southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

A Venezuelan migrant girl’s belongings lay on the floor at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. After the head of Mexico’s immigration agency ordered a halt to deportations in December, migrants have been left in limbo as authorities round up migrants across the country and dump them in the southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Venezuelan migrant Anyeli Reyes makes a video call inside the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. After the head of Mexico’s immigration agency ordered a halt to deportations in December, migrants have been left in limbo as authorities round up migrants across the country and dump them in the southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Rosana Mercado, a Venezuelan migrant, bathes her daughter inside the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter, in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. After the head of Mexico’s immigration agency ordered a halt to deportations in December, migrants have been left in limbo as authorities round up migrants across the country and dump them in the southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

A young migrant runs through the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter where migrants sleep on the floor on mats in Villahermosa, Mexico, late Friday, June 7, 2024. After the head of Mexico’s immigration agency ordered a halt to deportations in December, migrants have been left in limbo as authorities round up migrants across the country and dump them in the southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Venezuelan migrants pick out donated clothing at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. After the head of Mexico’s immigration agency ordered a halt to deportations in December, migrants have been left in limbo as authorities round up migrants across the country and dump them in the southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Venezuelan migrant Keilly Bolaños stands outside the bus terminal where she is living with her children and other migrants in Villahermosa, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. The single mother and her four children have been returned back to southern Mexico six times. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

The Bolaños sisters from Venezuela sleep on the ground outside a bus terminal where they are living with their single mother Keilly and two other siblings, alongside other migrants in Villahermosa, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Their mother said she was seeking asylum hoping to treat her her four-year-old daughter, right, for leukemia, due to lack of access to medical care back in Venezuela. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

The Bolaños sisters, from Venezuela, sleep on the ground outside the bus terminal where they are living with their single mother Keilly and one other sibling, along with other migrants in Villahermosa, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Their mother said that in Mexico’s northern state of Juarez she was beaten by the military in front of her children, loaded on a bus for two days, and left in Villahermosa. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

The Bolaños children, from Venezuela, watch videos on a mobile phone outside the bus terminal where they are living with their single mother Keilly and one other sibling, along with other migrants in Villahermosa, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Their mother was captured in the northern state of Juarez, where she said she was beaten by the military in front of her children, loaded on a bus for two days, and left in Villahermosa. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

A migrant takes pictures of health studies and an appointment with human rights lawyers for migrants who say they were beaten weeks before by immigration authorities near Mexico’s northern border with the U.S., outside a bus terminal where migrants sleep in Villahermosa, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. After the head of Mexico’s immigration agency ordered a halt to deportations in December, migrants have been left in limbo as authorities round up migrants across the country and dump them in southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Venezuelan migrants walk after being returned to Villahermosa in southern Mexico by the National Migration Institute, Sunday, June 9, 2024. After the head of Mexico’s immigration agency ordered a halt to deportations in December, migrants have been left in limbo as authorities round up migrants across the country and dump them in southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

An immigration checkpoint stands in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Mexico is under pressure from the U.S. to block millions of migrants headed north. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

A National Migration Institute agent checks the documents of bus passengers at an immigration checkpoint in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Mexico is under pressure from the U.S. to block millions of migrants headed north. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Honduran migrant Alexander Amador hides on the side of the road from immigration agents in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, late Saturday, June 8, 2024. Amador and his two travel companions had been walking for 10 hours after being returned twice to southern Mexico while traveling by bus. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Fabiana Bellizar, a Venezuelan migrant, is detained with other migrants after being removed from a bus, at an immigration checkpoint in La Venta, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. After being taken off the bus, the group of migrants begged authorities not to release them, but to help them return to Venezuela. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

A National Guard officer ispects the interior of a passenger bus at an immigration checkpoint in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, late Saturday, June 8, 2024. Mexico is under pressure from the U.S. to block millions of migrants headed north. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

A National Guard officer checks a vehicle at the immigration checkpoint in Nuevo Teapa in southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Mexico is under pressure from the U.S. to block millions of migrants headed north. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Mexican and U.S. flags decorate the window of a passenger bus that serves southern Mexico that stopped at an immigration checkpoint for inspection in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Mexico is under pressure from the U.S. to block millions of migrants headed north. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico (AP) — “Here, again.”

Yeneska García’s face crumbled as she said it, and she pressed her head into her hands.

Since fleeing crisis in Venezuela in January, the 23-year-old had trekked through the Darien Gap jungle dividing Colombia and Panama , narrowly survived being kidnapped by a Mexican cartel and waited months for an asylum appointment with the United States that never came. She finally crossed the U.S.-Mexico border in May, only to have American authorities expel her.

Now she was back in southern Mexico, after Mexican immigration bused her to sweltering Villahermosa and dropped her on the street.

“I would rather cross the Darien Gap 10,000 times than cross Mexico,” García said, sitting in a migrant shelter.

She clutched a crinkled Ziploc bag that held her Venezuelan ID, an inhaler and an apple — her few remaining possessions.

Venezuelan migrant Yeneska Garcia, second from left, sits with other migrants at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. "I would rather cross the Darien Gap 10,000 times than cross Mexico once," Garcia said. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Venezuelan migrant Yeneska Garcia, second from left, sits with other migrants at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Driven by mounting pressure from the U.S. to block millions of vulnerable people headed north, but lacking the funds to deport them, Mexican authorities are employing a simple but harsh tactic: wearing migrants out until they give up.

That means migrants are churning in limbo here as authorities round them up across the country and dump them in the southern Mexican cities of Villahermosa and Tapachula . Some have been punted back as many as six times.

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said Monday that the policy protects migrants.

“We care a lot ... about keeping migrants in the southeast because crossing to the north is very risky,” López Obrador said in his morning press briefing, responding to a question from The Associated Press about busing migrants to southern Mexico.

But the moves have forced migrants, including pregnant women and children, into even more precarious situations. That’s likely to worsen under President Joe Biden’s new asylum restrictions, analysts say.

Mexico’s actions explain a plunge in arrivals to the U.S.-Mexico border, which dropped 40% from an all-time high in December and persisted through the spring. That coincided with an increase in migrants in Mexico without legal permission, data from the country’s immigration agency shows. U.S. officials mostly credit Mexican vigilance around rail yards and highway checkpoints.

Josue Martinez serves juice to migrants during lunch at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. "Mexico is the wall," said Martínez, a psychologist at the only shelter in Villahermosa. "(The migrants) are trapped in the south," referring to Mexican authorities' tactic of wearing migrants out until they can no longer continue. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Josue Martinez serves juice to migrants during lunch at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

“Mexico is the wall,” said Josue Martínez, a psychologist at Villahermosa’s only migrant shelter, Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito, which was bracing for a crush of people under Biden’s measure to halt asylum processing when U.S. officials deem that the southern border is overwhelmed.

The small shelter has been scrambling since Mexico’s government began pushing people back two years ago. Last month, it housed 528 people, up from 85 in May 2022.

“What will we do when even more people arrive?” Martínez said. “Every time the United States does something to reinforce the northern border, we automatically know tons of people are coming to Villahermosa.”

(AP Video/Felix Marquez)

Migrants here walk or take buses north toward Mexico City, where they can request an appointment to seek asylum over U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s app, CBP One. But most never make it far enough north for the app’s location requirement.

Checkpoints dot southern Mexican highways. Armed soldiers pull migrants off buses and round up those walking along roads and in surrounding mountains. Of two dozen migrants interviewed by the AP, all said they were extorted by law enforcement or Mexican migration officials to continue on their journeys. After dishing out hefty sums two or three times, families had nothing. They were then bused back south, where most were left on the streets.

Mexican authorities refer to the temporary detentions as “humanitarian rescues.”

Venezuelan migrant Keilly Bolaños stands outside the bus terminal where she is living with her children and other migrants in Villahermosa, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. The single mother and her four children have been returned back to southern Mexico six times. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

The Bolaños children, from Venezuela, watch videos on a mobile phone outside the bus terminal where they are living with their single mother Keilly, and one other sibling, along with other migrants in Villahermosa, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

But Venezuelan Keilly Bolaños says there is nothing human about them. She and her four children have been sent to southern Mexico six times. The 25-year-old single mother wants asylum so her 4-year-old daughter can get treatment for leukemia, unavailable to her in Venezuela.

Days earlier, she was captured in the northern state of Chihuahua, where she said members of the military beat her in front of her crying children, then loaded them onto a bus for the two-day journey to Villahermosa.

“How can you run when you have four children? You can’t,” Bolaños said.

The family slept on cardboard boxes alongside other migrants outside Villahermosa’s bus terminal. Bruises still lined Bolaños’ legs. Yet she planned to take a seventh swing at heading north. She has nowhere else to go.

“I know that all this struggling will be worth it some day,” she added.

A National Migration Institute agent checks the documents of bus passengers at an immigration checkpoint in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Mexico is under pressure from the U.S. to block millions of migrants headed north. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

A National Migration Institute agent checks the documents of bus passengers at an immigration checkpoint in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

An immigration checkpoint stands in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Mexico is under pressure from the U.S. to block millions of migrants headed north. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

An immigration checkpoint stands in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

A National Guard officer checks a vehicle at the immigration checkpoint in Nuevo Teapa in southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Mexico is under pressure from the U.S. to block millions of migrants headed north. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

A National Guard officer checks a vehicle at the immigration checkpoint in Nuevo Teapa in southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Mexico’s tactics appear to be a way to appease the U.S., which has pressured Latin American nations to help slow migration while failing to overhaul its own immigration system that most Americans agree is broken. Panama’s incoming president has promised to block passage through the Darien Gap, while Biden eased criticisms of El Salvador’s president after he reduced migration .

When Biden announced his new restrictions last week, he said he “drastically” cut migration to the border “due to the arrangement that I’ve reached with President (López) Obrador.” He said he also planned to work with incoming President Claudia Sheinbaum on border issues.

But Michael Shifter, a senior fellow at the Inter-American Dialogue, said such measures are only short-term solutions that don’t address root causes of migration .

“They say this is a regional challenge we all have to face together, which is true,” Shifter said. “The problem is: if the U.S. can’t get its own house in order, that sends a signal to other governments asking: ‘Why should we work with them if the U.S. itself is not capable of dealing with the issue?’”

Some asylum seekers said they were ready to give up on their “American dream,” but can’t leave because they’re cut off from their consulate or are out of money.

After being taken off of a bus, one group of migrants begged authorities to help them get back to Venezuela shortly before being sent back south.

Fabiana Bellizar, a Venezuelan migrant, is detained with other migrants after being removed from a bus, at an immigration checkpoint in La Venta, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. After being taken off the bus, the group of migrants begged authorities not to release them, but to help them return to Venezuela. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Fabiana Bellizar, a Venezuelan migrant, is detained with other migrants after being removed from a bus, at an immigration checkpoint in La Venta, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

“We just want to go to the embassy in Mexico City. To go back to Venezuela,” 30-year-old Fabiana Bellizar told officials, after being returned from northern Mexico a day earlier. “We don’t want to be here anymore.”

They started traveling the same route the next morning.

Others said they would try to find work and a place to sleep in the city before continuing on.

López Obrador on Monday said work is offered to migrants in the south, but the few lucky people face precarious conditions. One migrant was paid $25 a day for 12 hours of work under the beating sun on a mango farm. Another said employers tried to coerce her into sex work.

Others are forced to take more dangerous routes, and into the arms of mafias looking to kidnap migrants .

Honduran migrant Alexander Amador hides on the side of the road from immigration agents in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, late Saturday, June 8, 2024. Amador and his two travel companions had been walking for 10 hours after being returned twice to southern Mexico while traveling by bus. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Honduran migrant Alexander Amador hides on the side of the road from immigration agents in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, late Saturday, June 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

At the first sign of flashing lights, 27-year-old Honduran Alexander Amador dove behind a tree, scrambling for cover in the shadows cloaking the road between the Mexican states of Veracruz and Tabasco.

Amador and his two travel companions had been walking for 10 hours, running into the jungle to escape authorities trying to scoop them up along the highway. After being returned twice to southern Mexico while traveling by bus, it was the only thing the Hondurans could think of to continue onward.

But they were frightened, both of Mexican law enforcement and cartels. In the past year, security in southern Mexican states such as Tabasco and Chiapas has spiraled as cartels battle for control over lucrative migrant routes.

“Here, you can’t trust anyone. Everything is a danger to you,” Amador said, swinging his backpack over his shoulder and walking into the darkness.

Mexican and U.S. flags decorate the window of a passenger bus that serves southern Mexico that stopped at an immigration checkpoint for inspection in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. Mexico is under pressure from the U.S. to block millions of migrants headed north. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Mexican and U.S. flags decorate the window of a passenger bus that serves southern Mexico that stopped at an immigration checkpoint for inspection in Nuevo Teapa, southern Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)

Mexico's future President Claudia Sheinbaum speaks during a press conference in Mexico City, Tuesday, June 11, 2024. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

Associated Press journalist María Verza in Mexico City contributed to this report.

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The DS-160, Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application form, is for temporary travel to the United States, and for K (fiancé(e)) visas. Form DS-160 is submitted electronically to the Department of State website via the Internet. Consular Officers use the information entered on the DS-160 to process the visa application and, combined with a personal interview, determine an applicant’s eligibility for a nonimmigrant visa.

Visa applicants must submit a completed DS-160, Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application for all nonimmigrant visa categories, including applicants applying for K visas. ( Note:   For K visa cases in process at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate prior to October 7, 2013, review the limited exceptions explained in the FAQs below.) 

Review the Frequently Asked Questions for instructions about using the DS-160.

Access the online DS-160 by clicking: Consular Electronic Application Center website .

Important Notice to Visa Applicants: After you have completed the DS-160, you must take these next steps below:

  • Print and keep the DS-160 barcode page. (You will not need to print the full application.)
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Mexico has a new president, Claudia Sheinbaum. What does it mean for the United States?

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When Mexicans elected a new president, they also chose the next negotiator-in-chief who will make tough choices with the United States on issues from immigration and trade to fentanyl trafficking .

Mexicans voted overwhelmingly for Claudia Sheinbaum, giving her more than 58% of the vote and a substantial mandate to govern the second-largest economy in Latin America and the No. 1 trading partner for the United States.

When President Andrés Manuel López Obrador leaves his post and Sheinbaum takes office on Oct. 1, she'll inherit a country that is reeling from slow economic growth and violence linked to organized crime . She'll also face a fractured relationship with the United States. Despite deep cross-border economic ties, the U.S.-Mexico relationship has been tested by the countries' shared problems with global migration and drug trafficking .

"The two countries have been suffering from an incredible fumbling of the ball in dealing with each other," said Tony Payan, director of the Center for the U.S. and Mexico at Rice University's Baker Institute. "I think the two countries need to come back to the table."

Politics: 'Finish the wall.' Why the southern border became a big issue for this New England state.

Americans may love "taco Tuesday" and vacationing in Cancun, but the complexity of the U.S.-Mexico relationship is often lost amid marketing and political rhetoric. Mexico’s stamp on the U.S. is everywhere.

It’s in the Mexico-made car parts  that keep U.S. autoworkers employed in Detroit , in the windmill blades exported to  U.S. clean energy plants , in the  pacemakers saving the lives of American patients  with heart failure, and in the $15  avocado toast on restaurant menus  nationwide.

U.S. exports to Mexico include grains grown in the Midwest and natural gas pumped in Texas. Mexico sends fruits and vegetables north, keeping grocery costs lower amid volatile inflation in the U.S.

The country  became the United States’ largest trading partner  last year, pushing China to the No. 2 spot, and the two neighbors now do  nearly $800 billion in trade annually , according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

But it’s a fraught relationship. Mexico is also the transit country for hundreds of thousands of U.S.-bound migrants, provoking repeated humanitarian crises at the U.S. border. And it’s the source country for the fentanyl that kills tens of thousands of Americans each year.

The U.S.-Mexico-Canada foreign trade agreement, known as the USMCA – negotiated during the Trump administration – is up for renegotiation in 2026. U.S.-based business leaders are concerned that renegotiating the deal could create uncertainty and hurt both countries' economies.

"Mexico is now the U.S.’s main trading partner," said Jennifer Apperti, director of the Texas-Mexico Center at Southern Methodist University. "To again reopen the door to things that have just been negotiated would be, honestly, not the best use of time. And business time is of the essence."

Domingo Garcia, president of the U.S.-based League of United Latin American Citizens, said in a statement that he looked forward to "building bridges" with the Sheinbaum administration.

In past meetings, Garcia said he found Sheinbaum "open, engaging, and willing to listen and share her thoughts on moving forward. Mexicans are vital to the United States' economic future and our hemisphere's overall robust vibrancy. At the same time, we must consider environmental and scientific initiatives in the interest of our well-being today and for future generations."

With an estimated 60% turnout for Sunday's vote, it was one of Mexico’s biggest elections in history. Nearly 100 million people were eligible to vote.

For the first time, Mexican citizens living in the United States were able to cast their ballots in person at 20 consulates in the U.S., including in Phoenix.

Contributing: Rafael Carranza, Arizona Republic

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  1. Mexico Travel Advisory

    Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links. Country Summary: Violent crime - such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery - is widespread and common in Mexico.The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to ...

  2. Visas

    The U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico are currently processing nonimmigrant visas. Applicants should expect a longer-than-normal wait time for this service and plan accordingly. For more information about wait times, visit this link. Applicants applying in the same visa class and whose previous visa expired within the last 48 months may be ...

  3. Travel Advisory: Update for Mexico

    Read the Mexico Travel Advisory, including the detailed state summaries and advisory levels for information on your specific travel destination. Read the Mexico country information page. Assistance: Contact Form. U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico. From Mexico: (55) 8526 2561. From the United States: +1-844-528-6611

  4. Are You Planning a Trip to Mexico from the United States?

    Report drug and alien smuggling. Call (956) 542-5811 in the U.S., 001800-0105237 from Mexico. Prohibited/Permissible Items. All articles acquired in Mexico must be declared. $800 exemption for gifts and personal articles, including one liter of alcoholic beverages per person over 21 every 30 days. Cuban cigars are prohibited.

  5. Is It Safe to Travel to Mexico? Here's What You Need to Know

    A spate of incidents, including a kidnapping and the death of two Americans near the border, have prompted travel warnings from the U.S. government. The border bridge between Brownsville, Texas ...

  6. Frequently Asked Questions: Guidance for Travelers to Enter the U.S

    Updated Date: April 21, 2022 Since January 22, 2022, DHS has required non-U.S. individuals seeking to enter the United States via land ports of entry and ferry terminals at the U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Canada borders to be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 and provide proof of vaccination upon request.

  7. Official U.S. Department of State Visa Appointment Service

    You are at the official nonimmigrant (temporary) visa information and appointment website for the U.S. Embassy in Mexico. Update: Validity of the Nonimmigrant Visa Fee (MRV Fee) All receipts for payment of Machine-Readable Visa (MRV) fees issued before October 1, 2022, expired September 30, 2023.

  8. U.S. Issues Travel Warning for Mexico

    The United States is warning travelers heading to Mexico to be aware of their surroundings ahead of the spring break holiday season. The warning, which was issued this week by the U.S. Embassy and ...

  9. Is it OK to travel to Mexico now? What to know, how to stay ...

    Mexico is "a tricky place" when it comes to travel and safety because "the security landscape and the security dynamic is so different state to state and city to city," according to Ballard ...

  10. Is it safe to travel to Mexico? Here's what you need to know

    There are 32 states in Mexico, and the US State Department has "do not travel" advisories in place for six, including Tamaulipas state, where Matamoros is located.

  11. Visit the U.S. as a tourist

    Entering the U.S. from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda. See what travel documents you need to enter the U.S. from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, or Bermuda. To visit the U.S. as a tourist, learn about tourist visas, ESTA, I-94, and visa waivers. Learn how to extend your stay in the U.S.

  12. Visitor Visa

    Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for a temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), for tourism (visa category B-2), or for a combination of both ...

  13. Homepage

    Ken Salazar. U.S. Ambassador to Mexico. Ken Salazar was sworn in as United States Ambassador to Mexico on September 2, 2021. In 1998, Mr. Salazar was elected as Colorado Attorney General and became the first Latino ever elected to statewide office in Colorado. He was reelected as Attorney General in 2002.

  14. How to apply for or renew a U.S. tourist visa

    Visitor (tourist) visas and other travel documents for entering the U.S. The visitor visa is a type of nonimmigrant visa for people who wish to temporarily enter the U.S. There are two categories: B-1 for business travel; B-2 for tourism and medical treatment; Learn about B-1 and B-2 visas, including: Reasons you would need each type of visitor ...

  15. Visa Wait Times

    Advance travel planning and early visa application is important. The U.S. Embassy and Consulates try to keep the visa issuance wait times as short as possible. Some visa types may have longer wait times for the application appointment and processing. Select the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply for current wait time information:

  16. Medical tourism in Mexico is rising among Americans : NPR

    Before the pandemic halted travel, some 1.2 million American citizens visited Mexico for health care. The number is rising quickly again, with border restrictions eased.

  17. Travel and tourism in Mexico

    And by a wide margin, the United States is the main source market for Mexico's inbound tourism. In the first semester of 2022, arrivals of air travelers with U.S. residency were over three times ...

  18. Mexico's Visitor Tax: A Comprehensive Guide for Travelers

    Visitax Tourist Tax Cancun is a new tax implemented by the Mexican government for travelers visiting Cancun and other tourist destinations in the Quintana Roo region. The tax was introduced on April 1, 2021, and applies to both foreign and domestic visitors aged 15 and over. The tax amount is (approximately $39 USD) per person and can be paid online or at kiosks located at airports, hotels ...

  19. 6 Best Beaches for Kids in the U.S. and Mexico

    For young snorkelers: Playa el Chileno, Los Cabos, Mexico. About halfway between bustling Cabo San Lucas and San José del Cabo, Playa el Chileno is no longer an undeveloped local secret. Now ...

  20. Mexico's president seeks agreement for US to send deportees ...

    Migrants and asylum seekers wait to be processed by the Border Patrol between fences at the US-Mexico border seen from Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico, on June 5, 2024.

  21. Mexico's tactic to cut immigration to the US: grind migrants down

    Yeneska Garcia, a Venezuelan migrant, cries into her hands as she eats at the Peace Oasis of the Holy Spirit Amparito shelter in Villahermosa, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2024. Since the 23-year-old fled Venezuela in January, she trekked days through the jungles of The Darien Gap, narrowly survived being kidnapped by Mexican cartels and waited ...

  22. Travel Restrictions

    The United States will temporarily limit inbound land border crossings from Canada and Mexico to "essential travel". This action does not prevent U.S. citizens from returning home. These restrictions are temporary and went into effect on March 21, 2020. They will remain in effect through 11:59 pm onOctober 21, 2021.

  23. DS-160: Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application

    The DS-160, Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application form, is for temporary travel to the United States, and for K (fiancé (e)) visas. Form DS-160 is submitted electronically to the Department of State website via the Internet. Consular Officers use the information entered on the DS-160 to process the visa application and, combined with a personal ...

  24. Mexico has a new president. What does it mean for the United States?

    What does it mean for the United States? When Mexicans elected a new president, they also chose the next negotiator-in-chief who will make tough choices with the United States on issues from ...

  25. Schedule an Appointment

    An official website of the United States government. Here's how you know ... Travel Advisory Level 3: Reconsider Travel Travel Advisory Level 3: Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, ... From Mexico: (55) 8526 2561. From the United States: ...